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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, May 23, 1915, SALT RIVER VALLEY, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1915-05-23/ed-2/seq-6/

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TIIE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN SALT RIVER VALLEY EDITION. SUNDAY MORNING, MAY 23, 1915
PACE SIX
Irrigated Lands Assure Success In Very Many Different Lines
Poultry Lifted This Family
From Poverty To Prosperity
(BY C. W. ALEXANDER.)
Tempo, Ariz.
Ttui i--r. y-ars apo last fall I inmo
If. the Salt liiver Valley on aitount
.f lt:ns; troulilt-, l'Ut was nimble to
j.ifoim any manual lalior bffoi the
i . t spring, ami a!..ut that time 1
ha.) us-l up marly all my resoun-es.
Not lM-ini; strong enough to attempt
working for any one else I bought
. -ow ami four dozen hens to see
what 1 eonUl ilo with them. After
they were paiil for alons with my
t-in tiiat I lived in. which was lo
. on a renietl lot. I had hut
iiiKi h ft b"twe-n myself and star
x.iiion. with a wife and three small
Iiildr. tt to support. So you see it
a a f'r.ed i-ace with me to suc-
. i or ro to trie poor nouse.
I',.r several years 1 Kept a daily
i EC r-H"ord. also the average priee
tiv esrss brought for each month,
:,!s,i the cii.-t of feed. So 1 was able
at liie en. I of thv- year to know ex
it, tlv what the hens cleared m )
m nth in the year. I learned I
in this way which months of the j
x.ar were the more profitable, and
i iiKe.,ii-nt iy w hich months to cuil- I
ihe townsite being subdivided - Into
five a re tracts.
The price was $62" for each tract
and 1 could not raise but $125. So
I mortnaKcil everything I had In
the world ami the five acres also
for the other $."i)0, and purchased
le of tile
n.v hens for market purposes I six mourns
which months to increase Ih.-leTear,
the hmil of mv eaoital. with
few milk cows for tin
tracts. Within the next
1 hinf made enough to
fence arid cross fence it
wire. Then I moved my
tent, c'niikens, cows and hogs, onto
l tie new place.
1 sold off my cows except
pull through ! homo use anil put the money
I could buy:"1"1 evei y lime I got $25
head 1 bought more hens
lit
ami
number to the l:mit of my
I rented a few milk cows
first two years and oStained pas-
!ture tlose to town, peddled tile milk
out which helped me to
for the time being, till
enough hens to make a livin.
also kept a strict cash account on ba.1 about ::om) layers on hand,
the cows each month of the year, j That many taking more ground, I
Another party furnished me a horse ! te.l five acres adjoining me
and a small ria. bought me a few 'widen I later bought on time) and
small hogs, to run on the shares-.. ' soon as I hati these two tracts
one for
in hens,
to $.'0
until I
ar.d I gathered up a!l the refuse f t om
the restaurants and hotels to feed
them, -i iil with the three things I
man.';:.'il to get a few dollars ahead.
At the end of three years I made
up n- niir.d that with the limited
api:ai at :nv disposal I could clear
more from the thick ns than from
either of th- others.
So far the hens had cleared me
over and above their feed from SI
to $!..".:; per hen each year, depend
ing on the age of the hens, the
cost of feed, and the price obtained
for the eggs. At this time there
was a trait of 4a acres adjoining
paid for, I bought another five acres
adjoining me. I bought this whole
t;( time also.
I used brush siieds for shade until
tlie f.-nit tries that I had planted.
soine in each yard, were large enough
for shade. These fruit trees now
bring nie a revenue of $200 to $:!00
annually besides serving as shade
for the chickens.
I was making enough from my
hens by this time so that I was
able to pay out the last five acres
within the next six months and
then I bought a 29 acre tract fur-
(Continued on Page Eight)
ii
coxvi:irnx(j alfalfa into uef.f
!n the broad alfalfa pastures of th? Vailey about -10,000 b e&d of bef cattle are fattened innuajly.
brinq top pr'ces in the Cotst markets.
They always
fourtesy Arizona Irrigated Land Co.
OLIVES AT IXCLKSIDE
The Arizona Ripe Olive, like the Arizona Crange, is in a class by itself. The lorg, sunny growing season and t-'ecp,
fertile soil produce a firm, r'shly flavored olive that is pronoarced "best" by epicuies.
Climate Adapted
For Successfully j
Raising Mulesl
(By JOSEPH LOVELL.)
This climate and our'alfaira are os- ;
pecially adapted for raising mules, and !
I find that they mature two years soon-
er than the eastern mules; that is. in
size. If th parent ntock is selected as :
stated above, mule colts raised in the
Suit River Valley will measure from
fix teen to sixteen and a half hands high
and weigh from 1200 to 1400 pounds at
the age cf three years. It, at this age,
they were any way to develop their
teeth and make them show two years
ohier, whit h would be in accordance
with their size, they would be ready
lor eastern market, while the eastern
mule would not attain the proper size
until it in five years old.
On account of our mild climate ami
green feel nil the year round our mules
grow and develop much faster than in
any other climate. Of course, the mare
and colt must have some care at foal
ing time and until the colt is two weeks
old. Keep the mare in a separate stall,
where the colt will be protected from
the chilly nights in the winter, nr the
hot ras of the sun in the summer.
Colts can be raised in every month of
th! year with good success. Some peo
ple, claim that a July or August colt
invariably lives, but my experience has
been that thev thrive as well as at any
other time. Krep the colt in tin1 shade
and give it a tablespoonfnl of raw lin
seed oil every other day for a week to
regulate the bowels. The first two
weeks of a mule coifs life is more
dangerous than that of a horse colt,
but alter he passes that age it is hard
to kill him.
The ipiistion often arises as to
whether tin re is any profit in raising
mules in tee Salt River Valley tin ac-
i count of the high value of land. I say
I there is, as a mule colt raised here is
j ready for work at from 2 to 3 years
i of ;i;p ;,nd is worth from $200 to $250,
if from good stock and has had reas-
unable care.
My expedience in mule raising cov
! ers fifteen years in Kansas, Missouri
j and Indiana prior to my coming to this
1 valley.
THERE ARE MANY RLOODED IIORSFS IN T1IF VALLEY
The newcomer is alwavs surorised at the extent of the exhibit of well-bred Valley horses at the Strte
Fair.
I
. Arizona
Fire Insurance
Company
Capital $200,000.00
Assets $490,000.00
The only Fire Insurance Company organized under the laws of Arizona.
Represented by Agents in all the Cities and Towns of the State.
OFFICERS
Eugene Brady O'Neill, President,
Epes Randolph, Vice President, John G. Spangler, Vice President,
Arthur G. Halm, Secretary, George H. Taylor, Treasurer.
DIRECTORS
H. W. Asbury, President Crystal Ice & ColdiStorage Company
David Babbitt, Merchant and Land Owner, Flagstaff, Arizona
Arthur G. Halrn Secretary
John R. Hampton, Attorney
John J. Kohlberg, President Arizona Laundry Co.
George A. Mintz, President Arizona Abstract Co.
Louis Melczer, Merchant
T. G. Norris, Attorn ey, Prescott, Arizona
E. B. O'Neill, President
F. T. LaPrade, Land 0 wner, Winslow, Arizona
E. A. Pascoe, Banker, Globe, Arizona
Epes Randolph, President Southern Pacific Co. de Mexico, Tucson, Arizona
J. G. Spangler, Cashier Mesa City Bank, Mesa, Arizona
E. A. Sawyer, -Capitalist, Winslow, Arizona.
EVERY INSURER IN THIS STATE SHOULD HAVE
AN ARIZONA POLICY
HOME OFFICE
YOU A
RE
WISE
WHEN YOU SECURE
insurance
FOR THE PROTECTION OF YOUR FAMILY
FIRE INSURANCE
For the Protection of Your Home
You Are Doubly Wise
WHEN YOU SECURE
L 1X1
nsurance
Thereby Protecting Both the Home and Family
from Loss by Reason of Imperfect Title.
Phoenix
i- rg i n .
i li e & l nisi LomDany
The strongest title insurance Company in Arizona.
$163,000 Capital and Surplus (paid up)' '3';II ILWL
18 North First Avenue
Phoenix, Arizona.
NOLL BUILDING
PHOENIX, ARIZONA

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