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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, May 29, 1915, Image 1

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E ARIZONA. REPUBU
AN INDEPENDENT PROGRESSIVE JOURNAL
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR
10 PAGES
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, SATURDAY MORNING, MAY 29, 1915
10 PAGES
iVOL. XXYI. XO. 11
Til
CAN,
Black Friday At State Prison
Is History Without Hangings
Stern Mandate of the Law
is Thwarted by Eleventh
I lour Recommendation
That Reprieves Issue to
Five Condemned Men
PARDON BOARD IN
SESSION ALL DAY
Finally, Without Concur
rence of Attorney General
Jones, Recognizes Wishes
Bryan and Approves Tem
porary Reprieve
(BY JO E. RICKARDS)
Sixt'ial Correspondent for The Repub
lican) Black Friday at Florence has passed
into history. It came and went with
some of the dramatic and so much of
the human that it will long lie remem
lxred by thoee whose duty called them
to the silent walls of the great con
crete house of correction in the desert
and those ho were ordered under the
stern mandate of the law to execute
for cause five men who awaited death
within the walls of the big building.
As early as Tuesday speculation was
rile in the prison as to the outcome of
the date set for the legal hanging, for
there were rumors that would not be
downed that the men were to be saved
from the law's sentence by a move of
their attorneys and while the rumors
were vague and without much to hang
hopes upon, still the friends of the con
demned did not require much to tinge
the clouds that hung over their friends
with a bit of silver lining.
The arrival of the two members of
the pardon board who had motored
from Phoenix ended the day and prom
ised to bring developments when morn
ing came, for they announced that no
meeting would be held until then. The
mass of telegrams and requests from
both sides of the question of the exe
cution of the men had poured in on
the three servants of the state and it
was this correspondence that prompted
the postponement of the meeting an
nounced to be held at night Thursday
at the prison.
The Fateful Morning
With the dawn of Friday the two
members of the board breakfasted ear
Iv and were at the prison at 8 o'clock
where they went immediately into
conference with Chairman Trott. who
had remained at the institution over
night.
The lack of prisoners going in and
out of the gates and the absence of
grey clad men in the fields adjoining
the grim walls were the only signs that
this Friday was any different than
many others that have passed since
several of the condemned men first
entered to await the stalking of the
spector of the noose.
In the office of the warden the cleri
cal force was reduced for the reason
that all of the trusties were locked in
their cells to await the stern business
which was to occupy the attention of
the guards and the men in charge of
the carrying out of the law's mandate.
From time to time in the first hour
after the board went into session, ar
rivals of automobiles which had left
Phoenix in the early morning broke the
stillness that htKi settled over the big
inclosure.
While many invitations are said to
have been sent out by Warden Sims
but few responded and most of the out
of town arrivals were sheriffs from
other counties or men engaged in up
holding the law.
True several makers of laws for the
state were there but the number to see
the sentences executed were far below
what must have been anticipated from
the number who received the black
bordered messages of impending death.
The Drawing of Lots
Shortly after nine o'clock Warden
Simms stepped into an ante room ad
Joining the office proper and as if by
magic or some preconcerted move the
grim faced guards not on the ram
tarts of the prison filed in by twos and
threes and the word was passed that
IntR would be drawn to determine who
should officiate at the trap. Two men
Recommendation Pleases
The Spanish Population
Interest in the situation at Florence
among the Spanish-speaking popula
tion of Phoenix was shown yester
day afternoon, when, a few hours
after the receipt of the word that
the board of pardons and paroles
had recommended a reprieve for the
five condemned men. the Liga Pro
tectora Latina had hundreds of dodg
ers on the streets with the news that
the men's lives were spared. The
jiaptrs. which were issued as an extri
edition of El Manajero, a local pa
per, were quickly snapied up and
lead with great interest by the
Mexicans.
In commenting on the action of
the board, the paper says: "This is
especially a triumph for the Liga
lrotectora Latina. demonstrating
that its efforts and sacrifices have
not been in vain. From the mo
ment that it came to the knowl
edge of the league that they were
Statement of Governor Hunt
While I naturally am in thorough accord with the oard's recom
mendation for stays of execution, the action t ken has occasioned no
surprise, since the courtesy due from any stale government to the state
department of the United States rendered it inconeeivaole that the board
of pardons and paroles would depart from well-established precedents,
or fail to preserve well-recognized amenities by withholding such re
prieves as were suggested by Secretary Bryan for the praiseworthy
purpose of safeguarding Americans in northern Mexico, and averting any
unnecessary international complications. Had there been no pardon
board to consider the state department's suggestion. 1. as governor,
would have had no hesitancy in granting such s'ays of execution as
were recommended by the he;norable secretary of state, who, at the pres
ent time, is apparently confronted with such exacting duties and trying
situations as entitle him to all possible co-opei ition and support from
state governments and individual citizens alike. While I heartily com
mend the deferential courtesy extended the state department by two
members of the board of pardons, I sincerely regret that their k.uelable
performance of a plain duty was not concurred in by the state's attor
ney general.
were necessary to do the work and af
ter a brier lapse the door opened to
send forth into the corridors the men.
The assembled visitors and members
of the press scanned their faces for
some tell-tale mark that would re
veal the twain selected for the task,
but they were rewarded with a eet of
masks that told no stories for these
men who were going to send five fel
low beings into the great unknown be
cause it was their duty had asked that
their identity be withheld from all
save those who were to be present in
the death chamber and even these were
pledged to secrecy when the choice had
been made.
A Tense Hour
As the hojr of ten approached men
shifted from seat to seat, looked from
the windows, spat, wondered in low
ered tones of each other if United
States Judge Sawtelle, who was to sit
on the petitions for writs of habeas
corpus at Tucson would grant the re
quests of the attorneys for the con
demned men, for the board of pardons
while they had made no statement,
were oaid to be solid for maintaining
their first stand, and the hope that the
friends of the condemned held to in the
United States court was the buoy
upon which they looked to float the
men to a haven of security.
As the minutes rolled by the tension
was broken only by the order of thp
warden to take the final statements of
the men. A clerk accompanied by a
guard slipped silently through the great
sliding gates to return a few moments
later with the will of one of the men.
the only one who was possessed of
enough to will, and statements from
none, for they had nothing to give out
even in this last chance but one to
speak.
The Jangling Telephone
From time to time the telephone bell
in the office of the warden would ring
and the press and officials looked ex
pectantly towards it awaiting the word
from Tucson which was generally con
ceded to be the reason for the pro
longed silence from the board in an
adjoining room but each succeeding
ring failed to bring the decision and
the minutes slipped into hours, unfit a
message arrived saying that the judge
LEGISLATURE IS INTERESTED
IK FLORENCE PROCEEDINGS
Of greater interest to members of
the legislature than any pending le
gislation was the speculation yester
day as to the outcome of events at
Florence. Soon after members met
at ten o'clock inquiry was made con
cerning any information from the
state prison. When a little after one
o'clock word was received that Fed
eral Judge Sawtelle had denied the
application for writs of habeas corpus
for the five condemned men, and
when still later, word was received
that he had also denied appeals in
their behalf, there were evidences of j
relief in the chambers and the cor- !
! riHnra of the statehouse and when i
still later, word came that the board J
of pardons and paroles had recom
mended reprieves, members refused to
believe it. It seemed the more un
believable when it was stated that
going to carry into effect the execu
I tion of the Mexicans, the league has
not omitted a single sacrifice to i
prevent it. and its efforts have i
been crowned with the victory j
I which is here expressed in these j
brief words. I
"The Liga Protectora Latina, in
the name of the Mexican people, j
cordially congratulate the governor
of the state of Arizona for his no- I
ble and humanitarian efforts in this j
case."
The Liga Protectora Latina, men-'
tioned, is an organization of Iatin
Americans that now numbers over
j 12,000 members in the state. The
j headquarters of the organization
are in this city, with locals in prac
I tically every town in Arizona. The
first annual convention of the league
will be neld in Phoenix. July 15. '
The league is said to be the stron-'
gest organization of its sort in the
United States. I
would render his opinion promptly at
11:50.
The tension broke for the time being
and the visitors, guards and officials
slipped down into the mess room and
munched at the tempting lunch which
the Jap chef had provided with a pride
that found no expression in the ranks
of the men who from force of habit sat
down to dine.
It was not a time for thought of
food, tile paramount question of the
decision was too much in the balance
to permit of counter attraction and ap
petites were lost to speculation on the
move of the board.
The Swaying Board
So silent is the board behind the
doors of its room that rumor ulips out
that t'iey were going to change their
decision, but the closed door tells no
tales and the speculation is but the
fancy of men who are keyed to high
tension awaiting the word that will
start tiie executions fir give the con
demned another respite from their sen
tences. What is the matter with the judge
in the Old Pueblos, has he found a hard
nut to crack in the problem placed for
his unraveling, or is he writing his
opinion and has he found that the case
must be presented in a lengthy review.
There are a thousand and one opinions
as to the cause of the delay that by this
time is making the warden pace the
floor, with anxious glances at the si
lent phone.
A Sign Is Given
Rut now. It is past the hour of two
and with five men to hang the time is
growing short unless the hours set be
tween ten and four can be lengthened
and the warden calls upon the assist
ing prosecuting attorney who is here,
for an opinion and he leaves the room
to write it. when something tells the
waiting men that there is going trr be
a break in the ocean of suspense.
Chairman Trott opens the door to the
office and asks for a stenographer. The
man of the typewriter is a trusty and
the trusties are all locked in the cells
with the other prisoners, so the guard
must be dispatched for the man and in
the interim speculation breaks loose
like a prairie fire. What is going to
(Continued on Page Five)
reprieves had been granted for nine
weeks. Surprise gave way to indig
nation when the news was confirmed.
Only the night before the senate
had adopted resolutions expressing as
delicately as possible, the confidence
of that body in the board. Members
of the house, though that body had
taken no action on the governor's
communication, had prepared a strong
statement or resolution, commending
the action of the board thus far. It
had received the signatures of eight
een, more than a majority of the
members. Hut when it was learned
that the board had rescinded its
former action and' had disregarded
the declarations of its members, it
was resolved to destroy the resolu
tion which it had been intended to
present to the board.
The Reprieves
Governor Hunt, late in the after
noon, acting promptly on the recom
mendation of the board issued a
proclamation of reprieve to all of the
five men for the full time recom
mended, nine weeks, which will ex
pire on July ,10. He disregarded the
suggestion of the board that he
should reprieve the men to different
dates in order that the "orgy of
blood" to which the governor had
frequently alluded might be avoided.
Finding of Judge Sawtelle
A resident of Phoenix who return
ed late last night from Tucson at
tended the hearing of the applications
for writs of habeas corpus before
Judge Sawtelle yesterday. He said
that there was never a moment when
the court appeared in doubt as to bis
duty in the matter before him. He
comolained that the attorneys pre
senting the applications had suggest
ed nothing on which they might be
based. He especially advised them
against the application for an appeal
which he was later compelled to deny.
The court also deprecated in guarded
language the whole movement for the
relief of the condemned men. They
could not be saved under the law and
though he did not say so directly.
Judge Sawtelle regarded as unwise
any effort which could only result in
prolonging their agony.
IS
STILL AFLOAT
WITH CREW SAFE
(Herman Foreign Office is
Still AVithout News of the
Torpedoing' of American
Steamship Except for the
Newspaper Reports
G ERMANY'S REPLY
COMING SUNDAY
Understood Reply to Amer
ican Xote Concerning
G erman v's Submarine
Warfare Will Be Deliver
ed to Ambassador Today
associated press dispatch
BERLIN, May 28. The foreign of
fice and admiralty, still without news
concerning- the reported torpedoing of
the American steamship Nu.bra.skan,
deprecate all discussion of the possi
ble effect on tiie Herman-American
negotiations, pending aut'ioritativ e
confirmation of the attack on the ship.
Ge-rman newspapers have printed
nothing about the Nebraska n incident
since the first Rotterdam dispatches
reporting the ship was torpedoed and
that she was still afloat with her crew
sale.
The torpedoing of the steamship
Ouflight is now established as due to
a German submarine, the report of
the commander of the submarine in
question having been received by the
admiralty. ' The commander stated
when he first saw the Gulllight she
was being convoyed by two patrol
boats, and he concluded she must be
a British ship or carrying contraband.
The pre.senco of the patrol boats, the
commander reported, made closer in
vestigation dangerous.
The main points of tiie German re
piy to the American note on the sink
ing of the I.usitania are probably
known to the administration at Wash
ington now, so that tiie note itself,
which it is expected v. iil be delivered
tomorrow, will not come as an auso
lute surprise. The American ambassa
dor had daily conferences with the
foreign office, where the terms of the
German answer was discussed. Ad
miral Behneke, acting chief of the
admiralty staff, called at the Amrr
ican embassy to explain certain tech
nical eletai's of Germany's position
relative to submarine warfare.
Note Public Sunday
BERLIN, Mav X.- It is understood
that Germany's reply to the Amer
ican note comeming Germany's sub
marine waifaro which will be deliv
ered to the American ambassador to
lnejrrow, will be furnished the Ger
man press em Sunday for publication.
While high officials scrupulously
avoided comment, it was evident they
are leiath to believe the German gov
ernment had underestimated the in
tense feeling of the Ameriean people
on the I.usitania disaster with a loss
oi more than 1"0 American lives, or
would seek to delr.y the reparation
demand d by the United States.
Count von Berostc.rff. the German
ambassaeleir, confirmed London re
ports that he had sent wireless mes
sages to the German feireicn officn,
declaring the American pre?:s is be
coming impatient over the de-lay in
sending the German reply, and that
the Nebraskan incident had aggra
vated the situation. Secretary Bryan
said that Ambassador Gerard hael
sent his own conjectures as to the
nature of the German reply, but said
nothing had beer, received tha-. couJd
be calleel an outline or offii ial infor
mation as to the contents.
(Continued on Page Four)
International
Board To Help
Tivo Americas
associated press dispatch
WASHINGTON, May 2S. An inter
natiemal high commission consisting of
nine members each from an American
nation was suggested to the Pan
American financial conference as a
means by which uniformity of laws
among western nations may be secured.
The suggestion was made by a com
mittee of delegates headed by John
Bassett Moore, former counsellor of
the state department, John Hays Ham
mond arid Gov. Chas. S. Hamlin of
the federal reserve board.
Another step toward the improve
ment of business and financial rela
tions between the Americas was taken
when delegates of the southern repub
lics unanimously approved a reoliftion
calling upon the business and commer
cial interests of the United State's to
unite within the next six months in
naming a delegation to visit all the
Central and South American countries.
Members of this delegation, the reso
lution proposed, will be guests of the
various nations and will be received
by the governments, chambers of com
merce and industrial organizations.
Diplomatic representatives of southern
governments accredited to the United
States will be asked to aid in formu
lating plans, for the trip.
NEBRASKA
MAKES A MlGtx Tr,
APPEAL FOR AID OF
STARVING MEXICO
Appalling Conditions in the
Southern Republic Bring
Intimation of Peaceful1
Intervention by United
States "
FEARFUL DISTRESS
AT OUR VERY DOOR
Military Factions Being
Appealed to May Safe
guard and Aid Forward
Supnlies of Food for the
Mexican Civilians
associated press dispatch
WASHINGTON, May 28. The pres
ident has decided to (serve notice on all
warring factions in Mexico that condi
tions in that country have become in
tolerable, and that unless they, them
selves compose the situation soon, seime
other means may have to be employed
to accomplish the result. The first in
timation of the president's determina
tion to take this -step came in an ap
peal issued as head of the American
Bed Cross, setting forth that "due to
several .tears of internal disturbances'"
unfortunate people in many parts of
-Mexico are reduced to the; verge of
starvation and urging contributions to
re-liel funels.
Later the White House gave out the
following :
"When tiie president's appeal for aid
for Mexican was issued it was also
stated at the executive offices that a
statement from the president on the
present situation in Mexico might be
expected within the next few days."
This statement has been prepared, and
will be issued after the cabinet meet
ing Tuesday and then communicated
to the leaders of all the Mexican fac
tions. High officials referred to the
president's forthcoming pronouncement
a neit meaning immediate intervention
as they emphasized the word "imme
diate'. The impression in executive
rpiarte-js. was that one purpose would
be to place the responsibility for the
present state eif affairs squarely upon
the military elements ef the southern
republic, which have overrun the coun
try, appropriated its food supply or
prev ented tilling the soil While anx.iiis
to continue the policy of allowing Mex
icans to settle their differences without
outside interference, the president said
he would be determined that civilian
imputation of the country should not
bo starved jn the meantime.
Talk of intervention which has been
dormant ever since the Kuropean war
diverted attention freim the situation
nearer home, was immediately revived
by the White House statement. Many
diplomatists who interpreteel the day's
events as a forerunner of a new policy,
thought intervention the inevitable
outcome of the situation and that the
United States is paving the way to such
action by notifying the world of its
(Continued on Page Seven)
LEGISLATURE ENDS WORK HERE
WILL RECONVENE AT PRESCOTT
The fust extra sessoin of the leg
islature adjourned sine .die at 6: in
yesterday afternoon. The second
extra session will be convened oi:
Tuesday morning, but the real work
of the session will probably be
transacted at Prescott. It has been
stated by members of the supreme
court and by the attorney general
that there is nothing in the laws to
prevent that procedure, and it is
further stated that the governor is
not averse te it.
Unless there is a change of senti
ment with respect to this matter,
on convening, the house and senate
will adopt a concurrent resolution
that the houses assemble at Pres
ceitt in the committee of the wholes
and when the work eif the committee
has be-cn finished, the members will
return to Phoenix, the committee
will r port to each house, and the
report will be acted upon.
It was said yesterday that thirteen
members of the senate favored this
program and a majority ef the
members eif the house. If the leg$
islature moves to the city that is a.
mile high, the Klks quarters, con
sisting eif two rooms, will be placed
at its disposal. Said one member
last night: Beside the delights, we
will be relieved of Zander." "No, '
said another, "if we adjourned to
Patagonia or Kamschatka, we woulel
find Zander there."
There was little for the legislature
to elei en the final .day. There was
be inspected for errors of type
writing and the passing of the levy
bill, which was in the course of
preparation in the tiffice of the state
auditor.. That was not ready when
the house met in the morning, and
the communication of Governor
Hunt transmitting decuments rela
tive to the execution of the five
men at Folrence were read. They
were duplicates of the documents
that had been received and acted
upon by the senate the forenoon .be
fore. Though they had been re
ceived by the house nt the same
time, they had not been read or any
Vs. .
RAY CONSOLIDATED
RESUMES DIVIDEND
NEW YORK, May 28. A num
ber eif e-opper companies eleclar
eel increased dividends today.
The Utah quarterly dividend, one
dollar, an increase of 2."i cents;
Bay Consolidated resumed its
37 1-2 eents riuarterly dividend,
which was suspended on ac
count of the war four months
ago; Nevada Consolidated, quar
terly dividend, 47 1-2 cents, an
increase of 12 l-2c: Butte anel
Superior. regular quarterly 75
cents, two and one-half extra.
ITALIANS TRY
IN ALPS MIS,
Well-Defined Movement for
Occupation of Important
Points in the Alps An
nounced in Official Re
ports associated tress dispatch
ROME, May 2S. Official reports
lrorn the? front show that Lieut-General
Cael-irna, Italian chief of staff,
is attempting to carry out a well
defined movement for the occupation
of important points in the Alps along
tiie Giudicarie chain of the Lessini
mountains and in the Sugajia Valley,
and the Carnic Alps. This maneuver
if acomplished, would place the
Italians in an advantageous position
to meet the Austrians if they should
undertake any serious attack fer the
purpose e-f invading Italy. It would
also permit the Italians to choose
the ir own time and place for mak
ing an attempt to force the moun
tain passes, and penetrate farther
into Austria.
The oe-ctipation of Altissimo
mountain. tiTHO feet high, is regard
ed as the most important achieve
ment in carrying out the plan. It
dominates the entire portion of
Lake Garcia in the Austrian terri
tory. The occupation ef Altissimo
mountain also means the domina
tion of three important Austrian
centers of communication with the
Province Trent. The first is Ala,
from which point starts the railway
leading to Rovere to. and Trent. The
second is Mori, starting from a
peint em a narrow gauge railway in
Rita. The third is Rita, which is
(Continued on Page Four)
other notice taken of them at the
lime.
Mr. Proctor offe-red a motion that
the janitor be instructed to have a
bill board place-el about the
preniise-s that communications from
the governor might be posted upon
them and not ceincealed. Mr. New
bury offered an amendment te in
sert after the we-rd "governor" the
words, "and the baseball scores."
Speaker Brooks, who is no sport,
ruled that the amendment was not
germane and the Prejctor amend
ment went to a vote and was de
feated. With the Newbury amend
ment it would have been easily
ca rriecl.
Replying to the communication
of the governor, Mr. Flanagan of
fered a. resolution directed to him,
reciting that there was nothing the
legislature could do in the matter;
the duties of the board of pardons
were clearly defined and could not
be affected by any act of the legis
lature, since they hart been imposed
t:pon tiie board directly by the peo
(Continued on Page Seven)
FOR POSITIONS
Promise Submarine War
Against Suez Canal Boats
ASSOCIATED PRESS DISPATeH
LONDON, May 2S. An inference
that the German-Turkish . alliance
proposes to begin a submarine war
fare against vessels leaving the Suez
canal has been drawn freim a note
recently issued by the Turkish gov
ernment. Such a policy, it is felt
here, might seriously menace the ma
rine communication between Europe
and the far east.
A message to Renter's frevm Con
stantinople says the neite in ques
tion, which was addressed to friendly
neutral powers, reads:
SUR1RINE IS
MENAGE BRITON
MUST DEAL WITH
Success of German Under
water Craft in Attacks
on British Fleets Makes
Officials Realize Danger
from German Increase
MORE BRITISH
BOATS SUNK
Cadeby and Spennymoor
Go Down, While Liner
Argyllshire is Fired Upon
But Succeeds in Making
Her Escape
associated press dispatchI
LONDON, May 28. The success of
the German submarines in the attacks
en the British fleet supporting the ar
my on the Gallipoll peninsula, which
resulteel in the sinking of the Triumph
anel Majestic, with the ever increasing
activity of these boats in the waters;
around the British Isles, and the threat
to carry the under-water warfare to the
Suez Canal, while they have nlt
caused any great uneasiness in naval
circles, hate brought the officials to a,
realization, of the great danger that ex
ists if Germany is aide to largely in
crease her fleet of "U" boats.
Today came reports of the sinking of
the British steamers Cadeby and
Spennymoor. the Swedish bark M.
Roosvalt and the statement that the Ifig
liner Argyllshire had been chased and
fireel upon by an under-sea boat, but
succeeded in escaping, reaching Havre.
Traele to and freim British peirus goes
on as though no submarine danger and.
it is stated there will be no interrup
tion of operations in the Dardanelles.
The fleet there will have to assist tho
army taking the chances of destruction
from submarines, mines and shell Tire.
The Turks probably will have another
invasion to meet befeire long. Unoffi
cial reports tonight utate that the Ital
ians have landed on the Island of
Rhodes, off the coast of Asia Minor,
w hile a cruiser is bombarding Bedrum.
on the Gulf of Kos and the mainlan-l
ot Asiatic Turkey, not far from Rhodes.
There is little change in the situation
on the eastern and western fronts.
The latest Italian move is believed
to be the first step in an attempt to
land on the Asia Minor coast. Tho
Italians claim to have made further ad
vances into Austrian territory in Ty
rol. Trentino and Istria but no import
ant battle- has yet been fought in this
southwestern theater of war.
The Austrians and Germans claim to
have made a further advance, in tho
operations on the eastern front, tho
aim ef which is the encircling eif Prze
mys, although they are meeting very
stubborn resistance on the part of tho
Russians.
In the west the French offensive
neirth of Arras is still in progress but
the advance eif the allied troops is
seemingly not so fast as when the at
tack was first launched. The British
are also engaged neirth of Labassee and
are almest continuously occupied m
resisting the German attacks around
Ypres. the capture of which place is
said to hate cost the Teutons an en
ormous number of men.
British Steamer Sunk
FALMOUTH, May 2.S. The new
British steamer Spennymoeir was sunk
by a German submarine off Start
Point, Orkney Islands. The captain
and five men of the e-re-vv tvero
drowned by the capsizing of a boat
while being launched. The engineer
was badly injureel by the bursting eif a
shell in the engine room. Twenty-threes
survivors wore landed here.
Austrian Submarine Sinks
ROME, May 28. It is offic ially an
nounceel an Austrian submarine wag
sunk by Italian torpedo boats in an en
agement yesterday.
MEXICANS PROTEST
associated press dispatch 1
B1SBEK. May 28. Charges that
General Calles. Carranza commander
of A.eua Prieta, violated American
neutrality by flying a biplane over
American soil while reconnoitering on
Thursday, was wired in protest by
Villa Consul Perez at Naco to tho
state department. Perez mailed a
full account of the incielent to Wash
ington tonight.
"The imperial Ottoman govern
ment, considering that the British
government has neit fulfilled! its ob
ligations, undertaken toward neutral
powers by the cemvention eif 1SSS. to
keep no warships in the Suez canal,
but is even now fortifying this canal,
and that the French government,
with hostile itnent against the Otto
man empire, has landed troops in
Egypt, has by these facts been placed
under the necessity of taking military
measures for the protection of its
imperial territory, of which Fgypt
forms a. part, and to extend hostili
ties to the Suez canal."

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