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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, June 01, 1915, Image 4

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1915-06-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 1, 1915
WOLTERS FIRST, CRANDALL SECOND IN
MARATHO
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PAGE FOUR
MOOSE
MOTORCYCLE
jSasdhalfll Hna WMdh
!
1
OLE MAN TROUBLE PASSES HARLEY
TEAM BY AND GREY ONES WIN OUT
Martv 'J raves Rides Fastest Race After Perrv ( Joes Out,
But Is Often Call.'l to Visit J lis 'Workmen
Indians Win Third and Fourth After Fearful Luck,
in Which All Sorts of Trouble. Figures Boido, luteal
Favorite, (ianielv Finishes on One (Minder, Winning
Fourth Frank Montgomery Stays with Losing Fiht
Until Flawed Out. and Awarded Fifth .Money Big
Crowd Sees Wolters and Oandall Finish LM Miles
Only ".") Seconds Apart.
ALBUQUERQUE
r No . Ma -nine Rider
3 - Harley Wolters
j 10 Harley Crandall
i 5 Indian Craves
Time
3:07:27 1-r,
3:S:22 1-S
..third
t
6 Indian Boido fourth
SKx Montgomery fifth j
Willi his Hurley-Davidson clipping
off the miles in neat stacks, once every
hi 2-5 seconds, .,n an average, Joe Wal
ters won the Moose Motorcycle mara
thon, and set the world's first 200-mile
record on "a mile track at 3 hours, 7
minuter, 27 1-5 seconds.
Harry Crandall, local hoy, riding his
lirst real race, finished second. Just fi
mile hack of Joe Woltens in 3:HS:22 1-5,
giving first and second places and the
undisputed long distance supremacy so
tar this year to the Harley Davidsons.
Marty Graves, his eight valve Indian
shooting perfectly, l.ut his tires giving
Inm trouble, lost enough time in the
pits. o that even his excessive speed
could not gain him any better than
third place.
I.f.renzo Boido. stricken at several
joints In the race, with varoius trouhles
finished with a poor cylinder, in time
lo grab fourth money.
Frank Montgomery, after having
been in the pits long enough to have
rebuilt n motorcycle, led his ported Kx
oelsior to the track with eighty miles
reeled off, about the time Wolters was
finishing his 160th mile, and when
flagged off after Roido had scored hie
20th time, was awarded fifth money.
No others finished. In the canvass
topoed pits along the quarter-stretch
of ih(- half mile track, were strewn the
hopes of the Merkel team, those of the
Kxcelsior when Bob Perry went
wrong ami two Indians those of Ger
ig and o'Connell. So that Just half the
entries remained in the running when
Starter J. C. Adams wagged the check
ered flag on Wolters.
Impressions of the Race
Consistent running, without lire or
other troubles won for the Harley-Da-vidsons
and their Firestone rubbers. In
much the same manner as that of Old
lield and Carlson in the Tucson race
last .March, Wolters anil Crandall shot
around the curves, eating up the niihti
in a steady, nnfliistered manner. In
spite of all announcements to the con
trary, it is not probable that either of
the winners did any laps in less than
ri seconds.
In the beginning, after Marty Graves
had shot into the lead, the two gray
ma hines began acting exactly lifc?
those of I'arkhurst :nd Artley in the
track events Iat fair week. Wolters,
1 who "managed'- Crandall, kept the IX-
year-old local boy at his elbow for
ini.es and miles, setting the pace that
his world of experience told him would
keep the tires in the best condition.
And at the finish, the condition of the
two b:: k casings justified Joe's con
tinual directions to his less experienced
riding partner. C'randall escaped from
Wolters' leash for a while, during Joe's
one visit to the pits for gas and oil and
began dipping the miles faster than the
old head desired. This resulted in a
call fiown, and when C'randall had
again been caught, he came in for a
signaled cussing. Crandall's rear tire
was worn to the fabric, while Wolters
was certainly able to do another hun
dred miles, a fact which proves the
wisdom of Wolters' ride.
Graves A Surprise
The riding of Martin Graves was a
revelation. Having hung back in the
practice and elimination miles. Graves
gave out the impression he was able
to cut 51 seconds with some difficulty.
Put once in the race, he began reeling
off the miles in astonishing time
WINS III 13TH
SCORE 5 ID 2
j Smiley Smitten for Three
! Runs After J laving Held
Visitors Nicely Since the
j Eighth M'Creery Starts
! Like a Winner.
BUT 1KI0N HURLS . . . .
. . 1HTLFSS B AS MB ALL
Hester's Two Scores on
Howling' 's Two Hits Save
Phoenix Shutout in Morn
ing (Same Mr. Sterling
(Jets in Bad.
EL PASO HERE TO
START SERIES TODAY
El Paso's crack ball club
shows up on the local lot this
afternoon and the Mackmen
and the Solons meet for the fir6t
time this season. The game
will be called at 3:30.
Figured on past performances,
the locals stand an excellent
chance of taking the series with
the El Pasoans. Although the
next six games will be just as
hard fought as the last, Hester
believes that his men will hit
the Texas twirlers better than
they did those from New Mexico.
(Continued on Page Five
JXt 1 2.JX lO
You keep on smoking" the
same old tasteless cigarettes.
Why?
Because you're in a rut.
You're tired of them! You know
you're tired of them!
They haven't given you a thrill of
pleasure for months.
You're hungry for a change for
something "Utterly Different".
Man alive ! NEBO plain end were
made for you.
They are the "Utterly Different"
cigarette.
They will give you an "Utterly Different"
kind of enjoyment an "Utterly Different"
value for your money.
Don't put off the pleasure.
GUARANTEE If after smoking
half the package of NEBO Plaln end you are
not delighted, return balance of package
to P. Lorillard Co., New York (Estab
lished 1760) and receive your money back.
10 CENTS
FOR
TWENTY
a
CIGARETTES
i
i
Yesterday morning's third extra in
ning game of the Albuquerque-Phoe
nix series might have been an in
teresting contest, even if the one
sidedness had been due to the un
disputed superiority of the said team
of Dukes. But when five or nine
chances of evening things were
slaughtered mercilessly by a well
intention but very erratic umpire.
the matter ceased to be funny, or
even interesting. Of course nobody
can tell whether or not Smiley So
noqui would have beaten the vl
siting batters in the first of the
thirteenth had Sterling not assisted,
but the fans love to believe that
the threa hits off Smiley would not
have happened had everything else
been well.
The same combination that sent
Hester over in the seventh, scored
him again in the ninth with the ty
ing run. And after that, no Sena
tor got as far as third. This was
mostly because Jordan positively re
fused to permit any accumulation of
s;fe hits in any one inning. And
th:t isn't all this remarkable pitch
ing chap did for his country,. His
two base wallop in the thirteenth
scored the run that broke the heart
of the Phoenix offense, and made it
easy for him to do things to the lo
cal batsmen in the last half
It started out like a regular 'oid
pitching duel. MeCreery had every
member of the visiting duo on Ii's
list that morning. And then disaster
f! me along in the seventh, bearing
a couple of hits ard a boot, and
bine: Jusi like that, Albuquerque hid
a little lead that the locals simply
couldn't overcome.
Twice, the Phoenix infield yanked
the pame out of the fire with :apid
double plays. Once. Bill PowliiM
slipped the ball and made it be
irood c.tr to MeArdle and the tast
es' two outs occuired that most
everybody in the park had ever seen.
This is how things happened to
Smiley in the thirteenth, after he had
consistently held the Dukes for five
innings:
Husky Carman took the ball on
his shoulder, so he says, and got
a base. The ladies fair wasted con
riderable sympathy on him. Charles
French executed a safe bunt, which
is a habit he has, when not en;iageii-
in getting hit on the shirl -s'eeve.
Billy Dodge's double organized an
out force out, wlen he grounded to
Hester and Hester nipped Carman at
third the only decision of the game
that smacked of blindness in Phoe
nix's favor.
But it was no use. Herriott hit to
right for one, and JCutt lost the ball,
permitting two to score where only
(Continued on Page Seven)
ARMORED RIDERS CROUCH
OVER DUSTY MACHINES! IN
RACE WITH .CLOCK HANDS
By LYLE ABBOTT
Crouching hooded riders with pil
lows in their buzzums a. couple of
lines of five each faced J. C. Adams
yesterday in the evening, and got
away on the first two century grind
ever promoted" on a mile track. Fiv.?
of them won glory, and five wisdom
in chunks of greater or less size.
It was twenty minutes to three
when everybody got through fussing
around, swearing at us poor of
ficials for not having got our stop
watches all together. Referee John
Hohl directed his national guard
cadets to can us all off the grounds
if we didn't be good. So everybody
in the sunny boxes had to tend
strictly to business, and enjoy the
soda pop as best we might.
That part of the race which was
clearly visible to the spectators as
sembled, was the part between huge
clouds of dust. As a matter of fact,
those ten machines just about tor"
j up an acre or two of Salt River
j valley soil and the unkind wind
: shifted it indiscriminately over the
! adjoining fields and us.
' One would see groups of riders
perhaps no two of thein in the
same mile, as far as their laps
j went, grind into a turn and spit
! f ire at each other in exciting little
brushes. There were several races
within the big race, which relieved
the monotony somewhat and brought
; the people cheering to their feet,
i While the motor makers and the
I tire makers and the others were all
j winning great fame for themselves,
: the yellow budged officials were
perspiring and kidding each other
I in the stands, with tense intervals
' as the checkers announced leaders
j finishing ten-mile laps.
I Then, out would come the stop
I watches, and for a few seconds,
! nerveless, efficient hands would
; grasp these delicate instruments and
'the iiiick eyes would survey the
hands that were flying almost as fast
around their two-inch dials as those
adorable mechanisms were circling
the mile track. Folks, we are right
here to inform you that it was
.SOME race between these motor
cycles and the little steel pointers
on the watches.
V'e add the little touch of distinction
that works the differences between be
ing dressed and well groomed. The
Wardrobe Cleaning Co., 237 N. Central
Ave. Phone fj04. Advertisement. d
WNS
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Joe Wolters on Harley wins the
200-mile race in 3 hrs. 7 min.
27Jsec. Harry Crandall on Har-
second, time 3 hrs. 8 min.
22 sec
ley.
No stops for mechanical trouble
of any kind. Never touched a tool
to either machine. Wolters stops
once for gasoline and oil. Crandall
stops twice for gasoline and oil.
(Jf These machines were pitted
against the best ported and eight
valve machines other factories
could turn out.
Consistent
Consistent
Note t
B
ac hines
e Harley
P
erfbrmance
PDioemiK Cf cfle Co
Agents 308 North Central Avenue
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