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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, June 21, 1915, Image 4

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PAfJTC FOUK
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, MONDAY MORNJNTJ, -.7 TINE 21 : 191.
Arizona Republican's Editorial Page
. j
The Arizona Republican
1'ublisln-ii bv
ARIZONA rrEMtSHING COM PANT.
Pwight li. Hoard
Chiu-Jr A. tauflfr. . .
I'.aitli v. fate
J. W. Spear
President and Mnnager
Husiness Manager
..Assistant Business Manager
Editor
Kxclusive Morriinp Associated Press rispatches.
Olfi.-e. Corner Second and Adams Streets.
Entered at tlie I'n.stoi'fice at Phoenix. Arizona, as Mall
Matter of the Second Class.
Alien
cn & Ward. Representatives, New York Office.
Hrutiswii k Building. Chicago Office, Advertising
Address all e-ommunieations to TUB ARIZONA RE
I'l lil.H'AX, Phoenix. Arizona.
H.isiness Office ..
ity Kditor
TKI.KI'HONES:
..422
..433
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
laily, cne month, in advance .75
Pally, three months, in advance 2.00
Pailv, tii months, in advance 4 00
paily, one year, in advance 8.00
Sundays only, by mail 2.50
MONPAY .ViHiXlWi. Ji :K
li'l
Party honesty is party duty, and
paity courage is par ty vn Vivwy.
(J rover ( K'Vi 'and.
The Passing Party Organ
The nano-v man. and he is happily K'owins:
I.-sk numerous, bnsos li is opinion .f ,i newKiaicr on
is nttiimle toward views he happens to hold. If
it entertains the s;';.'ie views, he eor.i-ielvrs it a val
uable and ably conducted journal. If it holds sen
tmlly different views, it is a "siieet:" if it agrees
with his views on some subjects and differs from
linn as to others, it is unreliable, aril inconsistent,
.is no two men hold exactly the :ame opinions on
all subjects, no fearless newspaper car. asrrcc with
any if its readers on all subjects, and no nevs
p.iper except a party orsjaii tan hold that one pv.rtv
is always right and another is always wrong?. A
party newspaper cannot, therefore, be an honest,
fearless ami independent newspaper, f ir no party can
1c always ripht or always wront;. A newspiiiier
hih is 11-it independent in thought and expression
i- not of tn'ich value to its readers as ait intei
l'.cter of events.
Fortunately, the day of tile party newspaper is
j assinsr w ith the !i im-- of the spoils system i'l
politics. The incentive to journalistic servility and
dishonesty is srrowim; less strong. The reward.) of
ia!n)ii'ir are leinir v.ithdrawn. Those rev. arUs for
merly consisted ef political ir.fluence and otfice for
the more powerful newspaix is (In'Vn to a few Inn
lired dollars a year for paltry printing cnr.tneets.
The people also are liscouratrms? journalistu:
dishonesty. Kvery Oliver, knot's that his pirtv is
not a I way.-: richt. lie now am! then otcs U ninst
it and feels a coriieotpt f-r the n-.-ws:aper whiah is
lc-s inilepemieiit ti'in himself, its partisan -or-:-isi
iir; is weakness and couar.lu-e. If it is weak
ami cowardly in factional and partv matters, it is
likely to he weak and cowart ly :n all matters.
The coim'rv is v. itnes.-unsr now a creat chance
in ne wsjifipers. It has been more marked biriior the
prtscnt national admiiiistiatioii. Keiiublican mws
i.apors have found iiiiith to approve in the conduct
"f Mr. Wilson and, at the same tune, have siwirtd
no just criticism. Democratic nevsp.iiers have like
vie I"-n fair, approving or disapproving, a. circum
stance appeared to warrant.
only the small, narrow republican newsiiupers
have been cotisistently virulent against the presi
dent, and only the small, narrow r.e.vspapers ha' t
lei: thai e- r administrative act has recprire-I tueir
defense t it.
The Repubi.can and the War
We speak with reret r tie loss of a sub-r-cri'-r
who re-eently severed his connection vith
this paptr because, ;ls lie said, he ilid not like the
haracter of our war new.-,, ile if-; a Oerman, a
sympathizer with the I-atherlard and that is to hii
tredit. About that time the news favored the allies.
If our subscriber, and we trust he will k'-wiie one
arain, had held on a 'lay or two longer, he would
i.ow be on our list, b-.-cause sin'-e then the news
has been running strongly in favor of the Ger
mans. We have to take the news as it co.nes. His
withdrawal from The Republican family circle was
the stranger for the rta-son thf:t most of our read
ers with wJiom we come into personal contact ac
cuse The Republican jf being pro-German. Fven
some of the members of The Republican hou-te-Iiold
think so, for households are divided on the
l-uhjceT of the war, but it is not no. If the Man
whose duty it is to record opinions on tr.is paoer,
thinks that this or that side will win, his opinion
is not prejudicial to the other side, for it can result
in the. taking of no trenches? and the sinking of no
battleslsips. As such opinions as The Repuhlicai
may have are not likely to be brought tr the notice
of any of the belligerents, they cannot have the
psychological effect of encouragement or discour
agement. In common with most newspaiers, Tht Repub
lican has disapproved Jftrnt time to time of the
Methods pursued by all the belligerents the bink
in; of American ships by the Germans, the capture
of them by the British, and the British misuse of
the American flai?.
We wish that all of our readers wculd take as
I road a view of The Republican as a reader of the
Chicago Tribune took of that paper In the follow
ing letter to that journal concerning its attitude
on the war:
ISeaver J.Kir.i, Wis.. June .'!. Editor of the
Tribune). In your caption o er a communication it)
the 'Voice of the people' you disclaim the charge
f heir.? either pro-Oerman or ' pro-English, and
assert yor.r pro-Americanism. May I poi'U out -hat
in maintaining your pro-A merieanism and strict
editorial impartiality you must of necessity appear
to flra-tuate in your synioathies wiLli either of the
allied belligerents, according to the evigencies of the
moment? Neither are at all times leyond rebuke,
especially when their respective activities directly
affect this nation, although a reasonable latitude
must be and is allowed because of the tremendotm
i:-soes at st.Lke.
It is such calm, dispassionate, and lagical analy
sis of such complexities i:s arise as emanates from
your chair and characterizes your editorials tint
helps preserve the n ental balance of intelligent
readers, to whom the principles oi justice and fair
ness are of deeper in. port even than a direct or
indirect blood affiliation with either of the waning
nations.
What is right and honorable must be praised;
what is base and dishonorable must be condemned
at all times, and in doinvc so, the deepest obl.ga
tion of friendship is expressed.
WILLIAM J. VINCENT.
We do not deplore the loss of a subscription,
but we dislike to lose a friendly subscriber. V.'c.
do not care for his money, but we cure a great deal
for his good opinion and for his estimate of The
Renublican as to its fairr.ess in all maters. -
i
"Ich Dion"
A corresponuent of the London Observer, which
through the kindness of Sir ttillxrt Parker comes
to The Ilepublicairs exch;cnge table, culls attniilion
to the interesting fact that Kdward, prince of
Wales, is the second Kdward, Prince of Wales, alter
a lapse of nearly six centuries, to serve taW country
in France. The first was the famous Kd.vard the
Plack Prince, who defeated the French at Crecy.
The ISlack Prince fought against the French, while
the present Kdward is fighting with them.
The correspondent, however, falls into an error,
led, it appears by a presumel authority In nueii
matters, that ot neglecting the most significant
feature of a historical incident, the .floptical oy the
Ulack Prince of his famous crest. He writes:
"It is stated on the authority of one of the
officials of Heralds college that Philippa of liain
ault, liueen of Edward III. and mother of the P.lack
Prince, used the three ostrich plumes as her house
hold badge' on her plate, etc. It is, then-fore, a- fair
inference that the young prince when he s-t out
for the war in France shoulJ, in the fashion oi
those days, take a la'lr s favour with him, and what
more appropriate than his mother's bnd:e, adding,
in her language, the words which have remained
attached to the badge ever since'''
While the ostrich plumes may nave been, and '
probably were, the household bailee of (Jueen
Philippa, the crest was won by the I.lack Prince
at Crecy. It was the crest of John, the blind duke
or' Luxemburg and king of lic-hcniia. who was
Killed ir that battle. H consisted of three ostrich
leathers. It was adopted by Kdward along with
the motto of the blind dUKe, "Ich Dicn" (! serve).
The Black Prince, therefore, did not take the
badge and the motto to Franco with him as a
"ialy's favour.' but lie won them on the field and
tick them back to England, where they may have
been adopted by his loyal mother.
The motto has served as an inspirilion to the
yoath of Ensrlana and all countries, who are thereby
taught that service is noble and that any capacity
in which one may serve his country or his feilow
men is an honorable one: "genteel" eio jdoymeiil.
if less useful, is less honorable. The men w ho ale
digging trenches in France and ' landers; who ate
driving ammunition and supply wagons, are no
unworthy to wear the ostri' h plumes. Kntrlanrt has
more at stake now than it had when Crecy was
lought.
Owners of grocery siores u( Los Angeles musi
ha e a very tricky class of persons to ueal with. "
They fathered an ordinance, passed by the city
io-.iniil. rco.uirig van owners to register all re
i.iovals of household stools. The mayor, however,
vetoed the ordinance, declaring that it was a species
of class legislation intended for the protection of
men who had "rerklessly -extended credit." Clearly,
the grocers will have to copy the German system
of espionage.
One way not to establish closer relations with
South Arneri'-a is attempting to pa.-s off inferiot
goods on South Americans. The New York Journal
of Commerce charges lome exporters wilt, shipping
inferior coal to new fcvjuih American customet.s.
These exporters must be members of that intelli
gent class of citizens which locks ui-on all foreign
ers as fools.
The Rio Grande league baseball season is com
paratively young yet, so that we have not lost con
fidence that the Phoenix team will attain the pen
nant. But it has two steep, ascents to make. At
Ibe worst, it cannot reach the bottom. 1 has some
hing soft and permanent to rest on the 1 iesoii
team.
One thing about the purchase of control of the
i:.i.it-il le Lite Assurance Society by Thomas Cole
man du Pont de Nemours is that his name will
feive a flossy n rjpearance to the company's (stationery
CALL US BLUNDERING MEDDLERS
The better this Mexicans look upon us as blun
dering meddlers, who, through ignorance of his
people, have helped mess his country by dangling
the fetish oJ self-government before the eyes of the
illiterate, and, by our weakened front before the
assaults upon our own nationals, have armed and
encouraged the lawless r.uiong ' them to sweer over
the country, drunk with new-found jower and the
lust for destruction.
This man says we ought to take a hand In re
storing order to hi. country; so do the native trad-,
ers. the real workers, and almost every man, indeed,
outside the armies and without a chance of looting.
But none carries us in his heart. There is not real
friendliness for us in any class, despite the smooth
Mexican orators who go to Washington, virtuous
and aggrieved, to pour their fervid tales of patriot
ism and constitut ionnlisui into the en etus of
state.
It is merely fine phiasint;; they set the constitu
tion asiile in Mexico whenever it is found expedient
for personal ends to do so. Little more patriotism
exists than affection for or truth alut Americans.
Mexico has developed patriots great ones: Hidalgo,
Morelos, Guerrero, Juarez, I'oifirio Diaz; but the
breed seems to have dwindled sadly, leaving an ora
tor remnant that declaims and agitates and pilfers.
There are, of course, still patriots, a number of
them, who fight with ideals of the highest ever be
fore them: but they are lost among the great num
ier that see in the present disturbance only personal
opportunity for idvancemeiit, or loot, or revenge.--Caspar
Whitney in the Outlook.
i Mrs. T. B. McClintic and dauj. htt-r. C , ji 'J-
i . a-'-vdjift -.-;- . "(i
CAPS ARE ON TABOO
IN CENTRAL LEAGUE
ASSOCIATED PRESS DISPATCH
NEW YORK. June 20. Base
ball slavery is being carried to
extreme limits in the Central Ieas-ne
Recording to reports that have reached
! the he;.dciuarters of the Baseball Play
ers' Fraternity. It is charged that the
, president of the league has issued an
j official order barring the wearing of
ca;js by the players while stopping at
hotels during trips about the Central
I circuit. The complaints do not state
whether the players are obliged to
wear straw or silk dome shades while
entour but it is known that caps of
all forms and styles are barred. Wheth
er the controversy will be settled by
strike or arbitration has not yet been
decided. . "'
The order, however, is considered as
likely to have a far reaching effect on
the future of baseball. The players
fear that other leagues will go to the
Central one better and demand that
their employes wear frock coats, fpats,
wrist watches and other Rotten Row
raiment once the players agree to dis
card caps for more formal headgear.
We
Shall lie Here All
Summer
Escrows
Trusts
Abstracts
Title Insurance
Phoenix Title and
Trust Co.
18 North First Ave.
IWAR'S EFFECT ON GOOD MEN
I Great Pacifists Become Bellicists of
the Most Ferocious Type
A widely known pacifist goes to the
great peace pow-wow at Lake Mo
honk and. electrifies the audience
there by advising the people of the
Cnited States to prepare for war.
This is an instance of the awful
upsets that this abominable war has
produced. It has turned some great
pacifists (who' could fight very well
if thev want'-d to) into pronounced
j bellicists, and some, well known hel-
Heists (who fight with their mouths
(only) into pacifists of the fade away
. variety.
! People who can remember the Civil
i War have a vivid recollection of the
, schrecklichkeit of some of the Quak
ers who volunteered in the early days
iof the- conflict. They seemed to de
velop -ill the ferocity that their an
'cestors had been suppressing for sev eral
centuries. And the swearing
I done by deacons and superintendents
of Sunday schools when, as cap
tains and lieutenants of volunteers,
they found their men exhibiting any
reluctance to charge the enemy's po
sition, sometimes nearly froze the
blood of the whole army. War is
said to search men's souls, and it
certainly does seek out all the cus
sedness that is latent in a good man's
nature.
After many excitinj; adventures in
the southern portion of the Philip
pine Islands, where sin- soujrht solace
following- the death of her hushanci,
the beautiful Mrs. T. P,. McClinli?,
who tefore her marriage- tluve yi.irs
agr was prominent id Washington
social circles, has arrived in .San
Francisco wit!, her little daughter,
Thomasia.
VILLA HAS NEW
(Continued from Page One)
ANS
(Continued from Page One)
campaign. c 'lie explanation is he is
c omii.g to confer with some prom
inent Mexicans, living in exile and
taking no part in the revolutionary
activities, but who are planning to
form a coalition with, some of the
dees in the field t r enable them to
get "active moral support. ' which
Wilson in ;i statement announced he
soon would give some group.
Knri'ue Llorente. Washington rep
resentative of tie Yilla-Zajjatu gov -eminent,
said he had heard abso
lutely nothing of ih.- movements of
Angeles. The Caiiiinza agency sice
out a statemcrt pointing out that
Angeles probably never would return
to Villa.
Huerta Enroute West?
KL T'ASil, Jain- I'll. There is an
unconfirmed report that Huerta is
nroute be re from N--w York presum
ably to confer with former Mexican
leaders. It was underst 1 that one
of H'irrta's daughters is already here,
but inuuiry at the- address given
elicited a refusal to discuss the
eiuesth n.
No Word From Colorado
SAN" l-'KAM'ISi'l ), .Tunc :0.-No
word has been received trom tne
Colorado, due to arrive at (iuaymas
tonight In the absence of word to
the contrary it is believed by -naval
authorities here that no trouble has
occurred between the marines and
the Maytorena fonts.
committee of Australians resident in
Kiaibml has been formed to visit them
and provide as far as possible for
their wants.
They all comiu in describing the
Turks as a first-class fighting man.
c xcept whe re the bayonet is con
cerned. N
Although the percentage of wounded
in the Oardanelles is very heavy, con
sidered in relation to the number of
men engaged, I hey say. this is some
what mitigated by the- unusually large
proportion of minor injuries. An ex
planation cif this is that it is due
to the preponderance of rifle and
i-l.rapnel fire as opposed to the ter
rible injuries inflicted by high ex
plosives in Belgium and France.1 An
other ameliorating factor is the dry
climate and sterile, non-infectious
chani'ter of the soil.
ECONOMISTS SEE END IN FALL
Fighting Is Reported
OS FOARD THK COLORADO,
GI'AYMAS'. June L'H. Fighting is re
ported in progress along the Yupii
river in the north of the American
settlements, indicating the Mexican
troops are- now beginning active op
erations against the- Yaipii Indiaais.
No recent attacks on foreigners by
Yaeiuis are reported.
Carranza troops are advancing from
Xorthern Sinaloa against the forces
of General Maytorena. The hurned
bridges north of Guaymas will un
doubtedly delay the transportation of
Villa troops from Northern Sinaloa
Advices from Acapulco and Salina
Cruz repent conditions eiuiet.
o
CLOSE -CALL FOR ROYALTY
Queen Victoria of Sweden Is Near
Victim of Airmen's Bombs
ASSOCtATUb PRESS DISPATCH
BKRLIX. June 20. Queen Victoria,
of Sweden and the family of Prince
Maximilian of Baden, narrowly es
caped injury from bombs dropped in
the French aviators' raid on Karlsruhe
according to the Overseas Agency,
which says an olficial statement was
issued concerning the attack on
Baden's capital. A bomb struck the
roof of the. castle above the bedroom
occupied by the prince's children and
another exploded above the chamber of
the Swedish lady in wi-Jting, Baronese
Hothschild. One of the occupants of
the castle at the time, was the dow
ager duchess of Baelen, an aunt of Em
peror William.
-o-
Back in 1855 it took 21 4 minutes
of labor to care fer and raise a
bushel of corn. In LS94 this had
been reduced to 41 minutes and it is
slightly lower now.
English Students of Finance Say Ger
many Will Feel Pinch of Poverty
The- students of political e-conomy
and finance, are the ones who be
lieve the war will end in the autumn.
If the allies can win enough vic
tories to bring to the population of
Germany the i ml of any dream of
ultimate triumph, then according to
this eceinomie view the pinch will
begin to count.
Then will German merchants and
German rulers look ahead to th"
long future of national poverty, fol
lowing v the terrific expenditures and
the inflation by which the expenses
are now met. Wheii the war began
the plan was by taking France at
once, to use it as an indemnity to i ay
the cost. With the collapse 'of that
idea, and rapidly dying p'ospects of
any indemnity from anybody, and the
wholly unexpected prolongation of the
war. German thinkers see bank
ruptcy staring Ihom in the face.
They do not look with satisfaction
on repudiating their debts by some
such method as funding coupons, or
scaling clown the indebtedness. They
e'o not look with satisfaction upon
being reduced in their financial stan
ding, not. to be. sure, as Brazil has
been, or Greece, but to a degree that
would be very gallinrr to a prou 1
nation. Austria is practically bank
rupt already. Russia Is not unlikelv
to repudiate after the war. nor is
France.
If there is one thing on which the
British government is determined, it
is that there shall be no inflation in
Fne-tf-net nothing to weaken the fin
ancial soundi-ess of the emoire after
the war. Uoyd George 1.P" gained
more since the w began than anv
other statesman, but he has been
critie'red for not taking a ounrter of
everybody's income at once. abo--e
sav $r,no a year, just as he and the
rest of the cabinet were criticized
for being too considerate of the liipior
interests. ;
There is very fair reason to be
lieve that Germany w"l t?k thes
ultimate economic truths into ac
onerd hv the tirte 'the oinirier ?s
-,r..'oa Xormiiii ITapgood in Harper's
Weekly'.
rj
A bnbv with two' heads and four
nrms was recently bom in Chicago.
The baby lived enly fifteen minutes.
R
28 MONTHS FREE RENT
ANCHE
READ THIS PROPOSITION AND
ACT QUICK !
We Have 240 Acres of Fine Land South
of Scottsdale.
100 Acres Near Phoenix
Which we will lease you on most favorable
terms for the next
28 MONTHS 1
You supply water and cultivate land
Take the Crap
If interested, phone 485
S. H. MITCHELL, Aeent
M. H. SHERMAN INVESTMENT CO.
1314 East Washington St.
ppllrW Job yy
Wif e ! m I snHffeti
K4
12
PHONE 422
Ask For
MR. ADAMS
Eff'ici'Micv -ilid Service have iriven the
Phoenix business men satisfaction in
printing work from The Republican
Print Siiop.
QUALITY In Your
Printed Matter
is a vital clement in your selling
problems.
It's at the
Republican
n
M

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