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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, August 25, 1918, Automobile Section, Image 11

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1918-08-25/ed-1/seq-11/

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IN THIS SECTION: SOCIETYCLUBSMUSICDRAMACLASSIFIED; ADVERTISING
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN!
utomobile Section
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR
Section Two
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, SUNDAY MORNING, AUGUST 25, 1918
Section Two
VOL. XXIX., NO. 94
WHY PLEASURE CARS? j
WHAT IS a pleasure car Presumably a car
that is used primarily for pleasure. No
vehicle can be a pleasure vehicle per se,
for vehicles are built for transportation, and
1 transportation is not of itself a thing of pleasure,
hut the process of carrying people or commodi
ties from one place to another.
A railroad is used daily for the pleasure of
i-oiw passengers, but we do not call it a "pleasure
railroad." If it were used chiefly for pleasure
we should have a right to do so, but the total of
its passengers and freight combined is such a
trifling percentage that we scarcely consider
them at all in estimating its usefulness.
The telephone does as much to promote
pleasure as any other institution in the world,
but who calls it a "pleasure telephone?"
The horse in his palmy days was used for
pleasure even, now he is not guiltless of the
charge yet his services as a whole have been so-
predominantly practical that he escapes the op
probrium of being a "pleasure horse."
The passenger automobile alone stands
cursed with a descriptive term wholly devoid of
utilitarian suggestion. Nothing in the whole list
of utensils devised for recreation bears a title so
destructive as the private carriage of the busy,
modern worker a carriage far more democrat
ically used than the horse carriage of old; a car
riage as cheap per passenger mile as the horse
carriage and with ten times its radius of action;
a carriage that annuallv in this country carries
23,000,000,000 more passengers than the rail
roads more, indeed, than steam and electric
roads combined and that saves a billion dollars'
worth of time per annum on even the most trif
ling valuation of the hours it conserves.
Well, either it is a "pleasure car" or it is
.not. There is no "twilight zone." What it is
depends on where it goes. If the farmer's car is
used six-sevenths to save his productive hours,
the fact that one-seventh of its use is for a needed
outing now and then certainly does not warrant
shunting it into the pleasure class. If the doc
tor's car expands his usefulness tenfold, the fact
that now and then it also refreshes his lungs and
rests his tired nerves can never detract from the
utilitarian chai'acter of its primary function. If
the busv woman's car enables her to add work
for the Y. W. C. A., the Red Cross and the Na
tional League for Woman's Service to the well
filled schedule of her peace time services, it does
not become a thing only of pleasure because, at
intervals, it also recruits her vital energies.
Ascertain why Canadians have found it ex
pedient since the war began to buy nearly five
times as many passenger ears an they had when
it broke out.
Determine the number of people on this con
tinent who have felt it necessary to do without a
host of other things for the purpose of owning
the motor cars they found so much more useful.
Figure how we should do the useful things
our motor cars make possible if there were no
motor cars in service.
Discover for vourself , as we have discovered,
that 2,700,000 additional horses Avorked to the
limit every day could barely shoulder the burden
in their sluggish, inefficient way, and that it
would take 13,500,000 acres not now in cultiva
tion to feed the horses.
And when you have summed it all up, go
back to your vocabulary and extirpate that lying
phrase, "pleasure car." The Kant Slip.
II
E
F
ARE METHODS
How the automobile has revolution
ized methods ot warfare was recently
pointed out by- President Samuel P.
'olt of the United States Rubber com
pany, manufacturers of United States
tires.
"In the days of the Civil war," said
Colonrl Colt, "transportation was slow
and tedious, being mostly in the hands
of the obstinate army mule and the
profane skinner. Operations and man
euvers which are carried on daily in
this war would have been impossible
then because of the tardy distribution
of supplies and armament.
"TVday army transportation is a
marvel of speed and dependability, and
rubber has been largely responsible for
the change. The fast motor truck of
today could not have been developed on
Mee tires, or on "tires of any known'
material other than rubber. Motor
trucks carry supplies for soldiers, am
munition for their guns , and even the
holdiers themselves making the army
of today more than ever dependent
upon mechanical transportation for its
effectiveness. The entente armies at
the present time use in the neighbor-
lined of S0.000 to 100,000 motor trucks.
"The passenger automobiles with
rubber tires make it possible for the
commanders to oversee operations on
-0, 30, 50 and even 100-mile fronts.
They make it possible for wounded
men to be quickly and carefully car
ried from the battlefield to the mod
ern hospitals. Thousands of lives are
weekly saved in this way. The motor
cycle takes the place of the mounted
dispatch bearer of other days. The
total number of motor cars in use by
the entente allies, exclusive of trucks,
is approximately 100,000."
o
President David Jameson of the
American Automobile Association re
cently presented to the two commit
tees the case of the car owner in com
munications to Chairman Kitchin of
the house ways and means committee
and to Chairman Simmons of the sen
ate finance committee. Mr. Jameson
commented upon to the fact that the
motorist now receives extensive taxa
tion attention from the several states,
referred to the certainty that any im
post on new cars would be passed
along to the consumer, and contended ;
that any charge on the original cost j
of used cars would be manifestly un- '
just. Mr. Jameson asserted that it i
would be as fair to tax coal as gaso- j
line, since both are fuel producing!
quantities. j
Several days after the filing of Mr. i
Jameson's communications, the house I
committee announced that it had de
cided to base the federal tax on cars
in use on a horsepower basis instead
of on the original cost.
Mill BOYS l CALL
TODO URGENTWOMONFARMS
DIVIDEND PAID
By 'JORDAN CO
TIN
T
YETDEC DED OH
The Jordan motor Car company on
August 1st paid a dividend of 8.6 per
cent to the holders of the original
Jordan preferred. Babbitt Brothers, lo
cal agents for Jordan, announced.
Jordan production which was origin
ally limited to two thousand cars an
nually has proceeded at that rate since
the first cars were shipped, yet on
August 1 the company was several
hundred orders behind in deliveries.
The company has been turning over
its capital practically every thirty
days, and in the July period the earn
ing were at the annual rate of 160 per
cent on the capita) invested.
BUSINESS
by
Mayor Jewett of Indianapolis Operating Avery Tractor Before the U. S. Boys'
Working Reserve ' '
BY ERNEST G. COHN,
Advertising Manager, Pratt-Gilbert Co.
The youth of America is awake. "To
farms" as well as "to arms" is the cry.
Boys by the thousands are going from
the cities to farms in a nation-wide
movement to handle the big crops this
year. Bigger crops and more food this
year means -some thing that affects
every man, woman and child of Amer
ica and the allies.
Shouting the Battle Cry of Feed
'cm." and "Keep the Home Soil Turn
ing," about 11,000 of the United States
Boys Reserve marclwd the streets of
Chicago to show their, down-stale
farmers their future "hands." Other
cities are having similar demonstra
tions, where the boys are becoming
fast friends with farm Implements and
particularly the farm tractor, the iron
hurse that turns furrows by the whole
sale. The photograph here shows Mayor
Jewett, of Indianapolis, operating an
Avery S-16 h. p. tractor, handled local-
The Tire Cushion and Sewed Tread
Company has been established in
Phoenix since May of this year, and
has enjoyed a steady increase of busi
ness since that date. They are enabling
the automobile public to economize on
tires by resurrecting two old and
probably discarded tires, sewing them
together and making a new one that
ly by the Pratt-Cilbert Company, for
the benefit of the Boys' Federal Work- ;
ing Reserves in that city. There was
good evidence that the boy of that city
is anxious to become a man of the son
and make things hum this year.
j The boys did remarkable work last
year. The Chicago Board of Education
placed 700 of them and had unsatisfac
tory reports of only three. They earned
about $80,000 in wages and were paid
only what the farmer thought they
j were worth. The work did them good
j physically and morally, gave them
j valuable experience, helped answer a
I serious labor shortage and did much to
j Increase the crops. Many of them may
later take up farming as an occupa
tion and make it pay well. At any rate
all will be benefited, for what man
in the city later in life does not count
the days of his boyhood on the farm
as time well spent.
will last as long as the original tire.
They are also the agents for the Na
tional Tire Cushion, a resilient ma
terial that takes the place of the air
and inner tube and is not subject to
blowouts or punctures. This has been
tried in other communities where it
has been on the market for some time
and found quite successful.
Mr. C. S. Thomas, one of the mem
bers of the firm, is from Missouri and
was formerly a traveling salesman for
a big Kastern hardware concern, cover
ing the entire .United States. L. B.
Troutman, the other member of the
firm, is from Hamilton, Ohio, and is
an experienced mechanic.
H STORY
sum
m
BOOK 10 LIBRARY
TOWING POLE
Washington, D. C. What final form
of taxing the motor car owner will be
decided upon by congress it is. not
possible as yet to predict. All revenue
measures originate in the house of rep
resentatives and then go to the senate,
which may disagree radically with the
houses interpretation of the situation.
Then the measures passed by the two
branches go to the conferees.
TIRES
Flsk. Firestone, tee McGrau, Good
rich, Savage, Summit, Republic.
SPECIAL
33x4 Summit Q. D. PI $19.00
34x4 Summit Q. D. PI $20.00
35x4'i Swinehart Q. D. PI. ..$27.50
36x4'S Swinehart Q. D. PI. ..$29.50
Distributors for Racine Horse Shoe
Tires Guaranteed 6000 Miles.
Norwalk Tubes
Size. Plain Tread. Gray Red.
:8x3 J13.00 $2.40 $2.60
30x3 $10.35 2.43 2.70
30x34 14.85 2.85 3.30
31x3 ,15.00 2.95 3.40
32x314 17.25 3.00 3.55
31x4 ' 22.40 2.80 4.25
32x4 ' 22.65 3.95 4.65
33x4 23.55 4.10 4.80
34x4 , 24.10 4.25 5.00
Ziti 25.90 4.50 5.10
36x4 23.65 4.75 6.40
34x4H 29.30 5 30 93
3."x414 30.75 5.50 6.;0
3x4H 31.25 6.75 6.40
37x4 4 32.10 6 90 6 50
Goods shipped on approval C. O. D.
Most up to date vulcanizing shop In
the city.
Auto Tire Co
FHONE 1S68
Cor. Adams and Second Ave.
Phoenix, Arix.
it's Up To You
To buy supplies for your car where you are protected
by a guarantee and are sure to receive 100 value
for your money
Many thousands of car owners have
been convinced that they can get
high grade supplies without paying
exorbitant prices, and if you are not
already
NEXJ
The New England Historical and
Genealogical society, through its li
brarian, has paid a unique compliment
to a booklet recently issued by the
Cadillac Motor Car company, by add
ing it to the society's library.
The booklet goes exhaustively into
the history of Antoine de la Monthe
Cadillac and his coat of arms, the
name and the emblem both being used
by the motor car company. It is a
complete historical work that has en
joyed a wide distribution. . Copies are
now in the hands of Cadillac dealers
for further distribution.
"My attention has recently been .
called to vour "The Coat of Arms of
AVhcn one of the cells shows a loss j l, gieur Antoine de la Monthe Cadil
lac' as a very desirable book for the
library of this society," says the li
brarian's letter.
"The generosity of publishers is am
ply shown by our library shelves and
by the pages of our magazine, the Xew
England Historical and Genealogical
Register, where for almost 72 years
the titles of new genealogical publica
tions given to the society have been
listed."
j A piece of two by four "scantling"
with two one-inch holes about six
inches apart and near the ends for use
in tying the pole to the car being
towed and the pulling vehicle, has cer
tain advantages over the tow rope,
since it holds the towed car at a safe
distance
o
INTERNAL SHORT
of specific gravity in its electrolyte of
50 or 75 points and no leak can be dis
covered, an internal short circuit is in
dicated and should be remedied at
once. Whenever the specific gravity of
One cell falls more than 20 points bj
low that of the other cells, there is
trouble somewhere and it should be
run down without delay, even if it is
necessary to call in the service sta
tion.
s
as to
done
how it
1 Ss I
YOU OWE
YOURSELF
a visit to our
store, you will be
welcome whether
you buy or not, our salesmen will be pleased to show you the supplies you are
interested m and explain why we can save you DOLLARS.
LARGE BUYING POWER and small reasonable profits is the whole thing
in a nut shell.
"EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTOMOBILE"
Special Prices on Tires and Tubes
Complete stock of High Grade repair parts for Fords
W estern Auto Supply Agency
141-147 North Central Ave., Phoenix
Other Stores Kansas City Denver Los Angeles and Seattle
3n
UQBGE MOTHER:
CM
BU5IME55
i
Barring accidents or extreme
abuse, the owner need have no fear
of frequent repair.
The car is light but substantial.
It will pay you to visit us and examine this car
The haulage cost is unusually low
Mc Arthur Brothers
Phoenix, Tucson,'
Mesa, Chandler,
Nogales
A R I Z 0
Douglas,
Glendale,
n a m

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