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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, November 14, 1918, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1918-11-14/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
THE AHIZONA REPUBLICAN, THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 14, 1918
6 li-W?.N.
F6W Earning Power
Depends largely upon your eyesight.
If poor sight is slowing up your
progress consult us.
Northrup Optical Co.
9 E. Adams St.
Phone 690 for appointment
DR. . G. BELT
NEW SYSTEM DENTIST
Moni.'ion Building Offica Phone 60S
SANITWJY SYSTEM
36 East Washington St.
Above Goldberg's Clothing
Store
Phone 3089
pi !
t -1 I
' I
fcfl
62
frill BltBlillA
Phoenix Seed and
Feed Co.
Wholesale and Retail
125 East Jefferson St.
S
.
E. S. WAKELIN
GROCER
WHOLESALE
Constable Ice and
Fuel Co,
Pure Ice Good Service
WANTED
SECOND HAND SACKS
PHOENIX WOOD &
COAL CO
223 South Third St.
If Yo uHave a Diamond
to tell for cash, coma dirct to
MACK GARDNER
45 North Central
GUARANTEED
TITLES
Phoenix Title t Trust Co.
ARIZONA HARWARE
SUPPLY CO.
The Only EXCLUSIVE
WHOLESALE
Hardware House in the State
Dead sheep are polluting the waters
of the Arizona canal, according to a
complaint received at the sheriff's of
Jice last nighl from the country club.
The complainant stated that a man
drove up to the canal and dumped dead
sheep into the canal.
Night Jailer kidmorr detailed Dep
' utv J-red Carls to investigate, but Carls
..returned later to report that he was
unable to find the dead sheep, advanc
ing as a theory that the sheep had
floated away in the rapid moving wat
ers, or had snasg"d somewhere along
the canal.
There has bon a number of com
plaints received of late of dead sheep
and other teail animals being dumped
into canals, against the state; laws, ac
cording to the sheriff's office.
Electric current from Roosevelt yes
terday suffered an interruption that
lasted nearly an hour and a half. After
11 long investigation the break was dis
covered the other side of Mesa, accord
ing to Assistant Manager llornberger
of the Pacific (ias and Electricity
company.
. Wire had been thrown on the' trans
mission lines, connecting the lines and
short circuitinr the current.
EXECUTIVE
With Initiative
! Moving to Southwest account of wife's
health. Age 31; 12 years experience in
accounting, office management, audit
ing, bookkeeping. Present connection
8 years.
Wants position with firm of
highest repute.
Any location in Southwest. Salary no
object. R. W. Fielding, Box 2253,
Memphis, Tenn.
1
DEAD SHEEP DUMPED
IN CANAL IS REPORT
LONG HUNT FOR BREAK
IN ELECTRIC CURRENT
TAXI
id n the Best It 'Josts No Mor
Phone Adams Aharmacy
1473 ASK r.JOR3051
SO PAFF
WATER. REPORT FOR NOV. 13
Elevation .f water
it 6 m
, '"nle is, acre feet
Iss in acre feet .
in
reservoir
1X1.31
267,916
723
Elevation of water in reservoir
! eie year ago 192.66
! C'ntent.s, year ago, acre feet. . .876,645
Vormal flow today, M. 1 19,040
-Normal flow, year acn, M. 1 20,fiSn
f Water used, north .side, M. 1 18.040
Water used, south side. M. 1 18.815
-o-
WEATHER FORECAST
Arizona Thursday, showers; Fri
day partly cloudy; not much change in
tempera ture.
-New Mexico Thursday showers;
Friday partly cloudy; not much change
in temperature. . (
Southern California Probably show
ers Thursday and Friday.
Texas Thursday fair,
north; Friday fair.
warmer in
WEATHER KEPORT
.Stations
" 2
liosinn 46
Buffalo -.40
Chicago 48
50 Rain .04
50 Clear .00
50 Clear .00
62 Clear .00
44 Clear .02
70 Cloudy .00
64 Clear .00
62 Clear .00
62 Cloudy .18
4u Clear .00
66 Rain .12
65 Clear .00
52 Clear .00
78 l't. Cldy .00
52 Clear .00
58 Cloudy .04
60 Clear " .00
58 Pt. Cldy .00
68 Rain' .02
64 Clear .00
54 Cloudy .00
74 Pt. Cldy .04
56 Clear .00
34 Clear .00
. 74 Cloudy. .01
Denver 50
Flagsi
Fresn
Calve:
staff 42
Fresno 64
a West on 02
Kansas City 54
lxs Ansi'li's 60
Minneapolis ......40
Needles 60
.Vew Orleans' 62
New York 48
PHOENIX, 68
Pittsburg 46
Portland, Ore 56
St. Louis 56
Salt TL-p 'itv Aii
San Diego . . .' 60
San Francisco ... .62
Spokane 50
Tucson 70
Washington 42
Winnipeg 32
Yuma 70
o-
LOCAL WEATHER YESTERDAY
6 a.m. 6 p.m.
, temperature, degrees ;6
Temp, of evaporation 50
Humidity, per cent 63
Wind, direction N
Wind, velocity, miles 2
Rainfall 0
Weather Cloudy.
68
56
46
N
4
0
PtCldv
Highest temperature 78
fowrst temperature 54
total rainfall o
Excess
temperature yesterday,
degrees.
Excess in temperature since the first
of the month. 5 degrees.
Accumulated excess in temperature
since January 1, 23 degrees.
Normal precipitation, January 1 to
date, 6.4:i inches.
Actual precipitation, January 1 to
date, 8.02 inches.
Accumulated excess since January 1,
1.53 inches.
ROBERT Q. GRANT.
U n
OBITUARY
Mrs. Edith C. Kersting
Funeral services for Mrs. Edith C.
Kersting, wife of Jack Kersting. are to
be held privately Friday morning at
X:30 o'clock at the Catholic church. The
funeral procession will start from the
church at about 9 o'clock. J. T. Whit
ney will be in charge. Burial will be in
'.lie Catholic cemetery.
Mrs. Kersting was born in Illinois.
She came to Arizona IS years ago and
shortly after arriving married Mr. Ker
sting. She is survived by her husband,
a daughter Vivian, 16 years cf age. a
son Vernon, 14 years of age, her mother,
sister and brother. Her sister resides
in Enid, Oklahoma, and her brother in
Tulsa. P.y an error an afternoon paper
stated the funeral would take place
tfiis morning.
Louis Wright Ott, Jr.
Louis Wright Ott, Jr., son of Mr. and
Mrs. Louis ott, of Clarendon avenue,
died Monday, November 11, from
drinking floral nicotine, which he got
fi'om the medicine chest, lie was two
years ami five months of age.
Funeral services will be in the home.
Rev. George Logic officiating. Moore
and McLcllan will have charge of the
funeral. The body will be laid to rest
in Greenwood cemetery.
Mrs. Fred W. Godard
Mrs. Krcd W. Godard. 28 years old,
died last evening at 7 o'clock of pneu
monia after an aillness of but five days.
Funeral arrangements have not yet
been made
A husband is left, but there are no
other relatives in Phoenix. Mr. and
Mrs. Godard came to Phoenix from
Portland, Ore., four years ago.
Mrs. Katherine McCoy
Funeral services of Mrs. Katherine
McCoy will take place in Whitney's
undertaking establishment at 4 o'clock
this afternoon. Burial will be in Green
wood. P CARD OF THANKS
n D
We wish to express our sincerest
appreciation to our many friends and
neighbors who were so kind to us dur
ing our recent bereavement. Niles G.
Hyatt and children. It
0
I TOWN TOPICS D
: n
WILL HOLD COURT Judge Pattee
of Pima county will hold court in Phoe
nix today, sitting in forcible detainer
cases in both divisions one and two of
the superior court.
ARRESTED ON LIQUOR CHARGE
Edith Clark was arrested yesterday
by Deputy Harry DeWinton and placed
in the county jail under a charge of
transporting hitoxicat'ng liquors
FINE A SPEEDER T. II. Porter.
arrested on South Central avenue by
Motorcycle Officer Papo and charged
with speeding was fined $10 by City
Magistrate Frank Thomas vesterday.
WILL DONATE PROFITS Harold
Marks, who sells Saturday Evening
Posts about the streets of Phoenix, will
donate all the prolits he makes on his
sales today to the United War Work
fund.
HELD FOR RAY OFFICIAL Ro
berto Kebila was arrested vesterday
Get the GenuirieV1(,''JVI
and Avoid dlyAVrJI
tMtto n o m y
CJHj Every Cake
upon a felony warrant sworn to by 1
Constable Lewis of Ray and is in the i
county jail awaiting the arrival here of i
Lewis today. j
THESE WILL WED Marriage li
censes were issued yesterday to Ed
ward A. Hall and Mabel Novinger, both
of I'hoenix; John Henry Mehl and;
Fannie Barber, both of Phoenix, and I
It. H. Lewis and Mary L. McKevitt, of .
Peoria. j
IN SUPREME COURT The case of
J. J. Hagan, appellant, against W. Out- I
ton. Kichard T. O'Donnell. C. C. Dorsey j
and the Morenci Consolidated Mines 1
company, appellees, from Greenlee :
county, was filed in the supreme court i
yesterday. i
KtlNUVATE CITY HALL The city i
commission chambers and clerk's of
fice at the city hall are being papered,
painted and renovated generally. The
commission meeting yesterday, on ac
count of the torn up condition of the
rooms, was held in the office of the
city manager.
PICKENS IMPROVING O. L. Pick
ens, constable of Mesa, who has been
seriously ill. is greatly improved. Physi
cians who held out little hope for him
a week ago pronounced him out of
danger yesterday. His is one of the
few c.a.ses of pneumonia that has de
veloped on the south side the past
week.
BAIL FOR ALLEGED. SLACKER
Quonk Shew Hong, charged with vio
lating the conscription act. bv savins:
in his questionnaire that he was born
in China, when the federal authorities
allege he was bora in this sountry. will
be admitted 1o $1,000 bail today. China
Dick, head of the Five Companies in
this region, notified the sheriff last
night he had employed F. C. Struck
meyer to defend Quong and that the
$1,000 would be furnished today.
, ROBBERY -CLEW FAILS A clew
that the Mesa constable had as to the
person or persons who robbed Hyder
Brothers store at Tempe Tuesday night
fell flat yesterday. H. R. Vepeda was
arrested by Deputy Nafziger of the
sheriffs office on advices from Tempe.
Vepeda was released shortly after be
ing placed in the county jail, there be
ing no evidence against him. It was
claimed last night that there was an
other clew upon which officers were
working. Hyder Brothers' store was
rreported robbed of over $2,000 in val
uable merchandise.
Weather for seven days ending No
vember 11 has been generally favor
able for the cattle industry in the state
and western New Mexico, reports R.
Q. Grant, meteorologist, in a bulletin
issued yesterday. The bulletin follows:
With the exception of a short stormy
period near the middle of the week over
northern Arizona the weather through
out the district has been generally fa
vorable for the cattle industry. Preci
pitation was principally in the form
of snow but was insufficient to mate
rially affect the situation. Three thou
sand head have been shipped to mar
ket from the Springerville section and
several thousand from Flagstaff. Ship
ments to pasture in California and
Mexico continue from Cochise county.
Arizona.
The bureau of estimates states rela
tive to pastures in Arizona that te
condition for the state is reported at 65
per cent normal, which compares with
70 per cent October 1. Cochise county
reports a condition of 40: Santa Cruz,
48: Tina, 58; Pinal, DO; Gila, 60; Gra
ham, 63; Greenlee. 65; Apache. 58;
Navajo, 45: Coconino, 90; Yavapai, 80,
and Mohave, 100.
C01TISINSTATE
65 PER CENT NORMAL
PASTWEEK'SREPORT
1
High Lou
Stations Temp. Temp. Prec.
Crown King M 18 .35
Douglas 6 26 .06
Flagstaff 56 9 .06
Ft. Bayard. N. M 60 10 .00
Grand Canyon 58 11 .00
Nogales SO 25 .00
Phoenix 83 33 .00
Pinedale 66 11 .0,-,
Pinto 51 17 .00
Prescott ...' 68 18
Tucson 86 28 .00
Williams ..66 .. .48
o
COURSES' OF TRADE '
CHANGED BY WAR
(Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.)
One of the commodities trade in
which has been practically revolu
tionized by the war is cheese. This
popular article of diet was imported
from Europe to a large extent prior to
1914. Statistics for this year show that
no less than 63.800.000 pounds were im
ported, some 26,000.000 pounds coming
rom Jtaly. 22,500,000 pounds; from
France, 3,700,000 pounds from Holland,
and smaller quantities from other coun
tries. By way of contrast the bureau
of foreign and domestic commerce re
ports that ninety-nine pounds of cheese
were received from Europe in August
last and 1,222 pounds in September, all
of it coming from Ituly. But. while the
trade in European cheese has been
practically killed, Argentina has been
building up a large export cheese busi
ness. Receipts frcm that source in
August amounted to 448,000 pounds.
and in Sptember 297,500 pounds. While
we are. importing cheese from Argentina
we are also exporting cheese to Europe,
the latest figures available, those for
September, being 2,000,000 pounds.
CHINA JUBILATES, TOO
AMOY, China, Nov. 13. (By the As
sociated Press.) News of the signing1
of an armistice belween the allies and
Germany was received here today. By
common consent today was made a
general holiday, the citizens of allied
and neutral countries here participat
ing in a spontaneous celebration.
Oct. 14. "My face and neck broke
out with small pimples which swelled
and festered until they were like boils,
When I opened them they filled again.
and caused intense pain and loss of
sleep. At last they were so disfiguring
I had to give up my position and could
not go anywhere. After five years of
this trouble, and having used many
other preparations. I tried Resinol Oint
ment and Resinol Soap. The pain and
itching was relieved at once, and when
1 had usrd'l'.j jars of Ointment and
sven cakes of Soap I was cured. Now
my skin is clear, and when I shave it is
as soft and pink as a child's." (Signed)
JeraJ H. Kessler, 303 East 93rd St.,
New York City.
Resinol Ointment and Resinol 'Soap
are sold by all druggists. -
RESINOL EIDS
HEARS Of UNSIGHTLY
SKIN TROUBLE
Now, my dear, throe suc
cessive winters is quite
enough to expect of that
old Ivogers Poet suit.
Mel). & 0. are advertising
their now fall suits and
''Scotch Mist" overcoats.
You should go in and
make your selection to
day. McDougall & Cassou
Hulett's Cough and Croup Balm, pre
vents infections
ELVEY & HULETT
Quality Druggists
Phoenix
'FORVIGTOHY',2473
Victory boys and girls to the number
of 2,473 have enrolled in the first three
days of the United War Wrork Cam
paign. Each girl or boy is pledged to
"earn and give" not less than $5 to
back up some soldier at the front.
The boys and girls have already
given $11,971 to the fund. The girls
are leading in number enrolled and
amount given. There are 1,497 girls
on the list already, while only 976 boys
have signed up.
State headquarters of the Victory
Boys and Girls division of the United
War Work Campaign have received
the following letter from noted and
beloved boy and girl authors. These
letters express these famous writers'
heart-felt attitude toward the young
folks part in the big drive this week:
My dear Girls and Boys:
Hurrah for Ule victory aeroplane
Post!
When .the librarians of New
Jersey assure me that I am among
the authors best liked by young
people, do you suppose that I
would permit myself to be any
where but in the aeroplane mail
bag? Not for a hundred worlds,
all as wonderful as the one in
which we are living! I should like
my ink to flow like the River
Marne and my pen to have winjrs
as fleet as those of the brave sky
pilot who carries the letters!
Will you, dear girls and boys, if
I have ever given you one hour's
pleasure with Rebecca, Polly.
Oliver. Carol. Mother Carey of
Penelope, pledge yourself to save,
earn or raise J5 for-welfare work
among the soldiers? I shall laugh
and cry for joy if I ever learn that
I have helped; if I ever learn that
we are working together for this
particular cause.
I am not writing to you as a
stranger, for I feel, in a way, that
we are friends: you who have
cared for my books, and read be
tween the lines how much I care
for you your smiles, your tears,
your approbation!
I hardly dare ask the boys to
help me; they will say that I be
long to the girls, and so I do, heart
and soul! But I might some day
pluck up courage and write a book
for boys, and then I should be
sorry to leave them out of this
. letter.
Yours for victory,
KATE DOUGLAS W1GGIN.
To the Victory Boys and Girls:
This is gTeat, just what so many
young patriots have eagerly asked
for a chance to do something to
show that their hearts are with
the brave boys at the front, in this
measuring up time of the whole
world.
Rest assured that every dollar
you raise, or bit of clothing sent,
will comfort some one who is
fighting to save you. You are min
istering to the wounded and the
hungry ones, even though you do
not see it with your own eyes.
Count on me to go, do and say
everywhere, ' everything in my
power to help along the movement.
Your friend and fellow worker,
ERNEST THOMPSON SETON.
Chief of the Woodcraft league.
Dear Victory Boys and Girls'.
As this letter is going to you by
aeroplane, you must see the picture
of someone who feels he knows
you through the close touch of
having for many years written to
you.
My message is that every boy
and girl in this country should
work in every possible way for the
interests of this United War Work
Campaign, bearing in mind that
every individual community spirit
counts just as docs the effort of
every individual boy in a football
game, or a girl in the manifold war
work which she has been doing.
Success depends upon the indi
vidual efforts combined in the one
completed whole.
Yours very sincerely,
WALTER CAMP.
0
PUSSES BEST TEST
TO BECOME FLIER
1
BOYS AID CIS ARE
ENROLLED TO SERVE GC
Word received in Phoenix yesterday
was to the effect that Roy Carson of
this city had bech the only successful
applicant in the final examination at
Los Angeles for ability for training to
becoma a flyer. There was a class of
five.
Roy Carson was a railway mail car
rier with a run between Phoenix and
Ash Fork. He left Phoenix a week ago
to tike hi?t examination for which he
had studied and prepared for some
time. Mis; Carson still is in Phoenix.
1
Scenes Like This Are to be Remembered
When The Peace Conference Convenes
iSS
Aerial uhotoirraph
Here is evidence in liUick and w bite
that the enemy committed this crime
intentionally. This aerial photograph
taken by the British Royal air force
IMES FOR SEI Ell
WINTER IS PHOEKIX
Miss M. J. Telford arrived in I'hoenix
yesterday morning to spend the winter
months jn the Arizona sunshine. This
will be the seventh winter for Miss
Telford in this city, who, having trav
eled all over the United States and in
other countries, states without hesita
tion that there is no peer of Phoenix
as a winter resort. As in previous sea
sons, Miss Telford will make her home
at the Hotel Adams.
"I left Yancouv r, British Columbia,
on Saturday," said Miss TVlfonl last
night, "and after traveling almost con
tinuously, .arrived here this morning. I
was in San Francisco on Sunday nt.ght
when news of the surrender of Germany
and the end of the war reached that
city. There was a monster celebration
and parade.
"After having spent six winters in
this town, I can say that I love Phoe
nix." declared Miss T lford with em
phasis EGYPTIANSTlSST
TO DEVELOP WHEEL
I Boston Transcript. I
History seems to give the Egyptians
the. honor of first developing the wheel.
With their trtmendous job of building
the pyramids, it is natural that they
should have been the first to invent
skids and rollers. Then some genius
found a way of attaching the rnliers
to the skids or platform and the first
truck was born. Then came another
genius who found a way of making
wheels out of slices of tree trunks and
of fastening these slices solid to the
axle, so that the wheel and nxle turn
together. The next step was to make
the wheels looe on the axle, and this
enabled the crude vehicle to turn cor
ners. The two-wheeled chariot.' :f which
there is a record thousands of years
before Christ, was among the first pas
senger vehicles. That it hud spokes is
proved in Homer's Iliad "Eight bra
zen spokes, the felloes Were of gold se
cured with brazen tires all around, ad
mirable to the sight."
With the fall of Rome, the. wheel
failed to develop for some hundreds of
years. Then, suddenly, st the begin
ning of the Seventeenth century, both
in England and on the continent, many
new types of vehicle, wagons and
coaches, began to appear. Oak was
used as spokes for the first wooden
wheels. Elm was used for the hub, and
an Englishman writes admiringly .of
the early American buggy: "The four
wheels were made so slender as to re
semble a spider's web."
Pa m
MM
mm
..-ri-v
5 Jt
i
showing a British hospital in France shortly after it was bombed,
j pilot shows a British hospital in France
j shortly after it was bombed by a
j squadron of the enemy aircraft. The
) remains of four huts in which helpless
ll tuner db
t:
ill
S ALLOWED
nli
Good, old-fashioned, wheat flour
l.read has returned.
No more substitute ingredients need
be used". This is the burden of a spe-
cial message wired yesterdav to all
food administrators in Arizona by the
state food administration.
All r?gulations regarding the use and
: ale of substitutes with flour have been
j lesciivied. This advice was based upon
snsinietiuns previously received from
Washington. The new order takes ef
fect immediately.
To absorb surplus stocks of substi
tutes, it v.;:s announced, the food ad
ministration grain corporation is for
mulating plans for the purchase of
sueli stocks from dealers.
The ."(.'-."') rule, calling for an enual
rse of substitutes with wheat flour,
went into effect .January 28. This was
t enlaced by the S0-2 rule on Septem
ber 1. the provision that governed up
to date.
-o-
il P. PAYNE DIES
IT SISTERS' HOSPITAL
Denny 1'. I'ayne. teller at the Phoe
nix Savings Bank & Trust Co., died yes
terday morning at St. Joseph's hospital
from double pneumonia following in
fluenza. The funeral arrangements
have not been completed, but it is prob
able thi't interment will be at St. Jo
seph, Missouri.
A wife and adopted child are left.
The home is on the desert near the old
Cross. lit canal on McDowell road.
Mr. Payne v:is connected with the
Phoenix Savings Bank & Trust Co. for
five years, coming to Phoenix from
Chicago where he was with the Harris
Trust and Savings bank. Mr. and Mrs.
Payne, i,oth attended the University
of Missouri at Columbia, and their
marriage was the culmination of a ro
mance at the university.
He was a member of the University
club in this city, was prominent in the
Christian church and universally liked.
Mis parents arc living at St. Joseph, his
old home.
Mr. Payne had been taken with. the
influenza some time before, had re
turned to his work at the bank, ap
parently well, when ho was again at
tacked, double pneumonia setting in.
It is requested that the friends send
no flowers to the house.
A C- ..4 a
mcii uiTkrckhr -
own feelinrfs
7 lJL O
Authorities agree that a great
many people can drink coffee
without apparent harm. m
If coffee doesn't disagree keep
on with it.
But if you think coffee is the
cause or your headaches, nervous
ness, heart flutter or sleepless
ness, quit coffee ten days and
drink
men were blown to pieces arc plainly
shown .in the foreground. Fourteen
large Red Cross signs distinctly paint
ed on other huts refute any claim to
a possible mistake.
building resumes.
MURYPEIllSeNB
Construction of the SlOn.U'iO school
building at Ajo was permitted to pro
ceed yesterday ty Washington authori
i ties, according to a telegram to that
effect received by the state council of
defense from Chairman C. E. Aridams.
now in New York, on his return from
the national capital. Other buildings of
every sort that have been held up un
der one war order or another will prob
ably be started or completed at the
earliest moment
About 100 applications for construc
tion that have been made to the coun
cil of defense in the last few months
and have been denied, were allowed to
proceed yesterday when Secretary
.Tritle advised each applicant by letter
of the lifting of the ban.
The first permit issued yesterday for
the erection of a house was to tne
Home Builders. The building is to b"
erected in the Mountain View tr:ict
Additions to the state capitol, upoe
which work has never ceased, it is said ,
will continue now without interruption
o
Norman Carmichael, state chairman
of the United War Work campaign, is
on his way today to his home in Clif
ton. Mr. Carmichael has given prac
tically all of his time to this work for
weeks and it is due to his untiring ef
fort that the slate organization was
brought to such a stage of perfection
that it has been able to cope in any
degree successfully with the handicap
of the influenza.
Chairman Carmichael has visited in
his automobile every settlement of any
size in the state in preparation for the
campaign week.
Accompanying, Mr. Carmichael is
Prof. F. C. Lockwood. one of the over
seas workers of one of the agencies in
terested in the United War Work cam
paign. They will reach Clifton on Sun
day, going by motor.
It makes no difference what your
wants may be, you can h'nve them sup
plied by using and reading The Repub
lican Classified Pages Arizona's Lead -ing
Advertising Medium.
rrwvn
I TO HOME AFTEn HARD
j WORK FORWAR DRIVE

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