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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, May 06, 1919, Image 14

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1919-05-06/ed-1/seq-14/

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PAGE FOURTEEN
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, TUESDAY MORNING, MAY 6, 1919
NEW MILS
WEKERS
II FIRST MEET
011 Board of Governors and
Council Give AVay To The
New HcM First Session
Review Year's Work.
. Old and new boards of governors and
councils of the Salt River Valley Water
f-scrs' association met yesterday to
yinish up the routine business that yet
remained from the past year and to
pass into the hands of the incoming
;iodics the authority which they will
wield until the next election ht;ings in a
new board arfd council. .
The retiring board of governors met
jn the morning to complete the small
irimoiint of unfinished business of their
term.
" The new council met with 19 out of
i's 30 members present. President VVil
.kinscm called the meeting: to order,
with the secretary acting as clerk. The
meeting organized by electing JI. C
J'hclps of Mes. chairman and K. K.
,!ai k, of Glendale, clerk. In the absence
Mr. Phelps. A. S. Reeves was elected
temporary chairman. Mr. Reeves was
the former chairman, but was not a
candidate in the recent election.
iThe meeting took up the rceommen
lation of the board of governors to
unend the by-laws of the association
Bi-o that the assistant secretary could
ue made office manager regularly and
uct in the secretary's place during the
'hitter's absence. The salary of the as
sistant secretary was fixed at $1100 per
month.
. A recommendation to increase the
ialary of the secretary was also dis
'cussed, but the matter was referred to
a permanent committee on by-laws and
salaries, which will be appointed by the
permanent chairman. The council ad
journed to the first Monday in June.
Hold Joint Meeting
." The new board of governors, met with
jill members present and reappointed
ild officers. Dr. Charles A. Van der
Veer was retained as secretary; S. C
thitiz, treasurer, and W. P.. Elliott, gen
eral superintendent. The title of chief
engineer was added to Mr. "Elliott's
former title. The selecting of an as
sistant secretary was left to a future
meeting, pending favorable action by
the council on the duties to be assumed
by that officer.
The board of governors went into
iuarteiiy joint session with the council
in the afternoon. Judge Will It. King,
"chief council of the United Stales
reclamation service, who wa-s in this
ritv yesterday, addressed the meeting.
3le commented on the satisfaction fed
by the reclamation service on the way
the Salt River Valley project has been
-.handled by tho water users' association
J-inee taking it over. lie explained that
;:it first he had not favored this action,
rluit that, he could see now that his fears
Jiad been groundless.
; The annual report of the secretary
was read, in which a resume of the
work of the association in the past year
was given. Following is the text of
I he report:
Report of Secretary
- The year just ended is the first full
jcar during which the Salt River Val
ley Water Users' association has been
in chiu-ge of the operation of the proj
ect. A number of important questions
have- been presented and much work
has been accomplished during the year.
- One of the first things to come up at
the beginning of the year was a further
endeavor to secure a decision as to the
disposition of the Horseshoe dam site
o;i the Verde river. This was following
up the association's claim for the site
;i order to build a storage reservoir
that would assure an adequate sup
ply of water for all the lands within
the exterior boundaries of the project,
including about 23,000 acres left without
f
tiiK
i V',t. ' vv
KKtr'
I TUESDAY TODAY WEDNESDAY I
Y V 1 vvV : THE WATERS FINE i !
I W , t l TODAY :
I J . fMv'iJ COME ON IN AND V
t VC V HAVE A GOOD TIME l
Z ' Cmh 5fc.nnt.vi blmi it,5. 11 i
r 1 - m
I SSI
I ) it 4 iY I AND THEM '
rX.-;,:(fr
permanent water rights by the survey
board. After a conference in Wash
ington with the secretary of the in
terior,, in which the association was
represented by President Wilkinson
and Legal Adviser Gust, the secretary
agreed to base his decision on the re
port of an expert engineer. Homer
Mamlin was appointed by the director
of the reclamation service, and after an
investigation is now preparing his re
port. By agreement the scope of his
inquiry was extended to cover the need
flf project lands for an additional wa
ter supply and the possibility of ex
tending the project boundaries should
the increased water supply warrant, as
well as the original question as to the
disosition of the dam as between ad
verse interests outside and the exclu
sive benefit of the project lands.
Need of More Water Felt
Depletion of the volume of stored wa
ter early In the year made it seem ad
visable to consider plans for adding to
the supply by pumping from under
ground sources. So urgent was the
need of preparing for a prospective
shortage that a special election was
called in August at which it was voted
to assess approximately half a million
dollars with which to install pumps
capable of developing about 220,000
acre feet of water. On the advice of
a board of engineers appointed for that
purpose, the wells were so located so
as to give, the best results in reducing
the ground water level which in several
areas within the project was coming
dangerously near the surface. These
wells are now being drilled, pumps In
stalled and will be ready for operation
when the big summer demand for ir
rigation is on.
The same board of engineers investi
gated the drainage question and made
a ' comprehensive report showing the
need of work in the way of both addi
tional pumps and deep ditches in order
to avoid the danger of further damage
to areas already near the danger line
of submersion. As under the present
articles of incorporation, the associa
tion has no power to engage in drain
age operations, an amendment to give
such power was put up to the share
holders at the general election and was
defeated.
Prepared for Shortage
Taking heed of the threatened water
shortage and in accordance with the
articles, an apportionment of stored
water and that developed from pumps
was made for the present irrigation
vear, dividing the water equally anions
the acres having permanent water
rights in the project.
' . Vnn nr,n Actl til id Vl 0(1
IICVV pUIlCy Ilia
by the association by making waste
ditches a part of the system. Arrange
ments are being made to take them
over after fulfilling certain conditions
and establishing the quarter section as
tne unit, tne same us iui ucvcij
laterals.
A new policv has been established
by the association by making waste
ditches a part of tho system. Arrange
ments are being made to take them
over after fulfilling certain conditions
and establishing the quarter section
as the unit, the same as for delivery
laterals.
In the way of construction work, the
association has installed a new unit in
the Mighline pumping plan for- which
the cont will be reimbursed in two
years by the owners of lands under
that canal which receives the benefit
of the work. Installation of needle
valves in tlx- north tunnel at Roosevelt
is under way to replace the balanced
valves. A new power plant is com
pleted and will soon be in operation
at the Chandler site. A crange in line
of about two miles of the Arizona
canal has been decided upon in order
to avoid further damage by flood
breaks from Cave Creek. For this pur
pose, a caterpillar action drag line ex
cavator has been ordered which will
afterward be used for maintenance
work on the canal. Contract has been
awarded for the building of a garage
and machine shop in which will be
housed the fleet of auto vehicles used
in the operation of the project.
Three vacancies have occurred in the
tward of governors during the year,
two by resignation and one by death.
The board has held 30 meetings and
in addition there have been eight com
mittee meetings. The council has met
seven times and there Tiave been fotir
joint meetings of the two bodies.
Financial Statement
Starting the year with a balance of
$242,536.47. there has been received
THE WATERS FINE
TODAY i
firtvcnwvu unci i
TitiTU nt I fTJtr
StnntTT BEAUTIE5.
FIT? ST YO W J.SFF
CINE n A. COMEDY
"hree Performances
aily 2:15, 7:15, 9:00.
'ICS ?5: and 50c
I
3
from all sources $1,513,348.39. There
has been paid out $1,336,200.93, leav
ing a balance on hand of $419,683.93.
This balance is deposited as usual, at
interest in Phoenix, Mesa, Glendale,
Chandler, Gilbert and Peoria banks.
With a view to improving the ser
vice an expert office survey has been
made and in consultation with ac
counting experts of the reclamation
service, certain changes in the office
force and methods have been agreed
upon which will be put in operation as
soon as- practicable. Already physical
changes have been made in office ar
rangements which make for conven
ience in collecting and accounting af
fairs of the association.
Respectfully submitted,
CHAS. A. VAN DER VEER,
Secretary.
John I. Gust, the legal advisor of the
association, reviewed the dry land suit
and told of the various steps that had
been taken in connection with it.
General Superintendent Elliott went
into more detail in regard to the me
chanical improvements that had been
added to operation and maintenance
equipment in the form of a dredging
machine and excavator.
The board of governors will meet
again in two weeks.
RESTRAINING 01
GRANTED TO CHECK
11 RITE RAISE
Claiming that the Mountain States
Telephone and Telegraph company
made changes in its rules and regula
tions without permission of the cor
poration commission, the state of Ari
zona yesterday instituted court action
against the company and secured a
restraining order from Judge Lyman
which will put a temporary halt on
any alleged unlawfeul increase of tele
phone rates.
It is alleged that on May 1, that the
defendant without authority from the
corporation commission put in effect
changes in rates, fares, tolls, charges
and classifications, the changes of
which would increase rates. The state
claims that several thousands of per
sons would be effected and the patrons
paying the increase would have no
means of recovery except by law. It
is alleged that the company threatens
to cut off the service of the patron re
fusing to pay the increase, or to dis
continue service to their damage and
loss.
The state claims that failure to se
cure permission from the commission
was in direct violation of the statutes
and asked that restraining order be
issued and the defendants ordered to
show cause why an injunction should
not be granted.
The increases in rates proposed af
fects Phoenix, Bisbee, Douglas, Glen
dale, Globe. Jerome, Nogales, Prescott,
Tucson and Yuma.
OF THE CASTE FOR
P. W. DeJong, popular salesman for
the Roper Motor Co., has established
the reputation of being the largest man
in the Phoenix Opera Club. The but
tons on his costume have been set over
four inches to accommodate his deep
chest. Some people hay mat five years
continuous service in the automobile
business is the best cnest developer
known.
E. H. Kreimer is the tallest man In
; the club and the one thing that bothers'
him is to decide which one of the eight
i pretty milk maids he shall kiss kiss,
! he must, and he'll be in clover wher
i ever he lands. He should shut his eyes
! and grab.
L. H. Tilden is responsible for the
big audience which it :s now assured
will greet the Opera Club at the initial
performance. His assistants. Miss
Maude Tanton, of the associate mem
bership committee, and Mrs. Ben
Spaldmg, have been on the job con
stantly. Tilhe can do more work and
eat and drink more than anyone in the
j organization.
Everyone wonders why Joe Kemper,
our able stage director, assigned to
himself the task of "making up" our
chorus. Joe says the chorus outshines
any beauty chorus he has worked with.
"It 'tickles everyone when he says,
"Now, girlie, you hold your hands this
way" addressingour staid and proper
school teachers as "Girlie" ! ' What
would Prof. Loper say'.'
I The distinction of being the most pa
' tlent member has been awarded to Ida
I K. Mervine. the accompanist.
Of course, she may grumble to the
I piano through the medium of her flng
I ers. but outwardly she is calm and
i smiling even when requested to play a
phrase over eleventeen times. Her gen
i ial disposition has won hr a host of
! friends.
The Heath studio has gotten out
! some very attractive photos of the
i principals which are being displayed in
I the windows of Kerr and Smalley, Owl
! Drug, John Hyder, Vic Hanny, Eagle
: Drug and Switzer's.
ELKS
The Coolest House in Town '
Phone 717 Brandon Bros, Mgrs.
A TRIUMPHANT HIT
OPERA CLUB NOTES
001 00
SHOW
nl!
Ed. Redmond Follies
Present
The Nautical Musical Frivolity
"THE 'TRANSPORT OF LOVE"
Prices: 30c, 40c, 55c Nights
and 20c, 30c Mats. (Tax Included)
w
TEER DP
Til TO PIT
CITY OVER TOP
Entire City Expected To De
vote Its Energies To Buy
ing and Selling Bonds
Another Big Meeting To-
night;
With all of Arizona celebrating an
official holiday, called by the gover
nor's office for the exclusive purpose
of selling and buying Victory Bonds,
Phoenix and the state at large have a
chance to go over the top with a jump
today. . .
It is everyone's privilege and duty to
either buy or sell bonds throughout
this day. A combination of both buy
ing and selling is the ideal solution. If
everyone who has not bought will buy,
and everyone who has not sold any will
sell but one bond, Phoenix will take
its place where it belongs, and where it
has always been heretofore at the
very top. Today is the city's chance to
redeem itself. ,
Everybody Buy or Sell
Stores and offices are requested not
to close, but to keep open ror the pur
pose of selling and buying bonds only.
Employees should be granted a holiday
provided they promise to work for the
loan. One big firm has posted a notice
on its bulletin board stating that the
entire personnel of the office will be
excused but only for Victory Loan
work. This is the right spirit, and the
one which will ram Phoenix over with
a vengeance today.
Also today offers the last chance to
get on the list of bond buyers, which
will appear in a day or so in the Phoe
nix newspapers. This list will contain
the name of every buyer, and the
amount he has purchased. Xo one can
afford to be left off of this list without
a mighty good reason and the reasons
are few and far between which are
valid in this case.
This list will tell the tale. Are you
there? Will you be there, after today
has passed? This is the last chance.
LAST LOAN MEETING TONIGHT
Tonight's grand stand meeting will i
wind up the "wake-Up Week" which
has lifted Phoenix from the state of
lethargy into which she had drifted,
and started her well along the road to
ward the attainment of her quota in
the Victory loan.
These meetings have turned out good
crowds each night, and the people have
shown their appreciation by respond
ing to the appeal for bond sales by
buying well. But there still remains a
good portion of the quota still to be
raised. This is the task for the re
mainder of the week.
The Colis.um Theater company, in
costume, and with all new numbers,
will put on an entertainment at the
grand stand tonight for the crowd.
Their work last Wednesday night dem
onstrated that they are a real musical
comedy company, and this show will
be well attended in consequence.
Good speakers have oeen provided,
and a German helmet will be auctioned
off, as usual. This is the last of the
week's meetings, and a oanner attend
ance is desired. Turn out. and make the
last of these meetings the biggest and
most enthusiastic yet.
BLYTO
E THIS CITY
C. A. Beasley of Washington, D. C,
a member of the Bankhead Pathfinder
Commission, which passed through
Phoenix last week choosing a route
for the Bankhead highway, was in this
city yesterday on his return to his
home from San Diego, California.
Mr. Beasley stated yesterday that it
had not been definitely decided as to
the course of the route but the deci
sion would probably be announced
within the near future. It is thought.
however, that there will be no doubt
but what the new highway will be
routed through Phoenix.
The commission ended their inspec
tion trip at San Diego last week hav
ing traveled over the roads from El ,
Paso, Texas, through New Mexicoandj
Arizona to the coaat city. They were j
in charge o"f C.: A. Itountree, the di- i
rector general of the United States'!
Good Roads association and secre-1
tary of the P.ankhead highway associa-!
tion, who is a man of national reputa- j
tion as a road worker and booster. :
o i
STATEHOUSE CLOSED TODAY j
Today being a holiday by the procla-
mation of Acting Governor Sims, of- j
fices in the statehouse will be closed. i
CHAUTAUQUA
TODAY
McDonough-Eagle-ston
Co.
Musical Program
and
Dr. Joseph Clare
. Lecture on
"The Riddle of the Rus
sian Revolution"
This Week
PRIVATE PEAT
APOLLO CONCERT CO.
LEWIS MILITARY
QUARTET
CZECHOSLOVAK
BAND
EDW.F.TREFZ
111LK1
ROUTE PROBA
Id
Starter
SEIETT OFFERINGS
RARE COMBINATION
A theatrical entertainment combin
ing the best the motion picture world
has to offer in the way of a master
comedy production and a novel bit of
vaudeville work by six bewitching girls
from the Mack Sennett studios, is that
being offered again today and tomor
row at the Columbia theater. The
joint attraction includes "Yankee
Doodle in Berlin," the greatest of ail
comedy photoplays in five big reels, and
the Sennett Bathing Beauties, six in
number".
There's a laugh at every turn of the
camera crank in "Yankee Doodle in
Berlin." a film satire On the house of
the Hohenzollerns. The sub-titles are
exceedingly rich in humor and add
much punch to the production.
The mermaids made famous by Sen
nett's two-reelers give piquancy and
vital interest to the local premiere of
the comedy king's most ambitious mo
tion picture undertaking. The enter
tainment is irresistible in quality. t be
ing one of the biggest value the Colum
bia has offered at its playhouse in
weeks. ,
Every Sennett face and figure that
has come to national fame through the
production of the king of film comedy
are seen in "Yankee Doodle in Berlin."
And to make the film his comedy mas
terpiece, Sennett even went outside his
own studios for the first time in his
tory' to secure a performer to fill a
leading role.
Among the leading characters seen in
the play are Bothwell Browne, Charlie
Murray, Ben Turpin, Ford Sterling,
Marie Prevost, Phyllis Haver, Chester
Conklin, Eva Thatcher, Bert Roach and
the Sennett Bathing Beauties. Every
one of these performers has a national
reputation.
The six Sennett girls who are ap
pearing in person at the Columbia
theater are Gladys Allen, lma Berline,
Maryon Aye, Billio Fricker, Tarn Ar
taroff and Virginia Pox. They are a
youthful lot. take it from us, the oldest
being 22 years and the youngest 16.
Augmenting number' for today and
Wednesday is the sensational Pathe
Review film, a portion of which is de- k
voted to the slow motion pictures. Ac
tion of the heart, one of the most won
derful films ever produced, is shown in
the Pat he Review, while the slow pic
tures are devoted to boxing. A current
f"" "t numbers for
today and Wednesday.
Famed Gaby Deslys Coming
Gaby Deslys, "darling of Paris'' and
the fascinating French dancer, comes
to Phoenix in a wonderful cinematic
presentation of Marcel L Herbier's "In
fatuation." This sensational French
production, made at a cost of more
than $1,000,00"' and in which the beau
tiful Gabv wears fashion creations val
ued at more than 5S00.000, will be the
feature offering at the Columbia thea
ter Thursday, Friday and Saturday of
the present week.
Infatuation' is the story, not of a
woman of the fashionable world, but of
a humble flower worker who rose from
poverty and temptation to be the
adored dancer of the gay French capi
tal. And an unusual twist the woman
who was the flame, becomes herself
the fluttering, helpless moth.
This picture, elaborate and costly in
I its setting and dressing, was maae uy
the Eclipse Film company oi r ranee
and directed by Iouis llercanton. for
merly stage director for Madame Bern
hardt in Paris and also for ir Herbert
Beerbohrj Tree at his majesty's thea
ter, London. It was be who directed
Madame Bernhardt in the screen class
ics. "Mothers of France aid yueen
Elizabeth."
Gabv has a strong emolional role in
the play, which She interprets with sur-
prising strength and power. Also, she
wears some new and wonderful hats
and costumes over which the designers
and modistes of the world's fashion
center spent many months before the
big picture was put into production.
The Ed. Redmond Follies received
another welcome home, reception last
evening, this marking their opening
at the Elks, the former home in pre-
vious seasons, rionu inuuiea suiuic
and repeated encores attested the
wairoth the theatergoers of this city
have for Ed. Redmond and his tal
ented organization.
The play selected for the opening
performance is one of those breezy
affairs with just enough plot to make
it interesting and not deep enough to
make one think of anything but soft
ocean breezes, pretty girls and all that
goes with a regular girly-whirly show.
In the "Transport of Love," Ed.
ilOtMi mOOO uyrll
Phoenix L i iAfr ,V A 4?-
Production rtf fv V V" V? VJM hi
Phoenix , , iMf ijf7 i
Musicians f l:tZ,'4S r Uk ' 1
--iSSCf
HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY NIGHTS
Seat Sale Eagle Drug Store Tickets $1
i
If you tried to make a single mule do the work of a team you would
probably kill the mule. Use judgment with your Tractor and don't
overload beyond reason,
by Henry Ford.
"There's
"Ask the Man
Ed Rudolph
Phoenix
Adams and
Fourth St.
Redmond is seen as an irascrible man
of wealth who suddenly opens tip his
purse strings to a renegade nephew
and incidentally wins for himself a
bride that he selected twenty years
ago.
Joe Kemper and Bobbie Deane are
seen as the loving duo while Peggy
Betts gives a good characterization
of an old lady suffering with imagin
ary ills. Orville Harris appears as
friend of the young lothario while
Eddie Mitchell, he of the grando gusto
voice plays an effeminite character
in a screamingly funny manner.
Marvin Hammond dominates the
scene with her every appearance on
the stage, playing a folorn housemaid
and characterizing it as an apparent
half-wit who shrewdly upsets the pet
plans laid by the trio of young shums.
Irene Noblitt has little to do save a
few song numbers but these went over
big and Clara Hazzard made a de-
! cided impression with her acting as
well as singing.
Taking all in all, "The Transport of
Love," is a real summery show and
played by the Redmonds jn top notch
style and will no doubt meet with
good houses throughout the week.
Morley's Country Club
The new show this week in tho free
Airdome is particularly attractive. The
second episode of the "Lure of the
Circus," is as thrillingly spectacular ;
as the first and the continuity remains
unbroken.
"Strike Breakers," the comedy, is a ;
ridiculous farce for laughing purposes
only. j
The regular program will prevail in ,
all departments of the park tonight
and tomorrow night, bu't Thursday
will see the peak of the Victory loan
drive reached with a celebration at'
i
g
j f.
fc
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; .
j E,
j
j t
j K
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1 1
CAN-
OPENING TODAY FOR ONE WEEK
'REAT ITALIAN OPERA COMPANY
Graziani-Castillo-Mondragon
Under the personal direction of Ignacio Del Castille
Opening with the treasured favorite - ,
"Lucia de Lanimermore"
Prices Plus
War Tax
23
7
oemx
Milk Maids Chorus
1 lfojr i
A -1;. T. :
vHS ' I
j- i i
1000 Fordson Tractors being turned out daily
A Reason"
Who Owns One
G lends !
Grand Avenue
Motley's that will be long remembered
in Maricopa county as the night of all
nights. There will be a special illum
ination of the park and every paid ad
mission will be given a thrift stamp.
The Marathon race starts at the Hotel
Adams at eight and winds up at
park. Mack Gardner has given a,
beautiful Silver Loving Cup to l.
awarded to the winner and Pinney
and Robinson a track suit for second
prjze. There also will be plenty of
other prizes, as well as entertainment.
CAMP VERDE ROAD PASSABLE
T. J. Imler writes to The Republican
from Flagstaff stating that the road t.
that place, by way of Camp Verde,
has been driven over in a motor car by
him, and is not impossible as has been
reported. . Mr. Imler stated that the
road saves a great deal of time in mak
ing the journey to Flagstaff. The road
is bad between Stoneman's and Mor
mon lakes, but the remainder jg In fair
shape.
f MORLEY'S D
Country cluB
OPEN EVERY DAY
SWIMMING, DANCING
CABARET SPECIALTIES
MORLEY'S JAZZ BAND
5c CARFARE
Free Bos from End of Line
EVERY NIGHT A BIG NIGHT
Where Everybody Goes
Phone 751
Ray F. Brandon, Mgr.
Rows
Rows
$1.50
$1.00
7 Row 77c
4 Rows 50c
era Club
For
The
Benefit
of
Phoenix
Associated
. Charities .

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