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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, January 01, 1920, Image 8

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1920-01-01/ed-1/seq-8/

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PAGE EIGHT
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 1, 1920
MERRY CROWDS
M m STREETS
GREET B YEAR
Stroke Of Midnight Signal
For Cheers And Shouts
By Mirth-Seeking People
Many at Watch Parties
To the din of whistles, horns, shouts
cheers and scattering shots. Joyous
Jaxz In the dance halls and prayer in
the churches. Phoenix at the stroke
ot midnight last night ushered in the
year 1920.
The death of the old year and the
birth of the new was celebrated in
Phoenix last niht about as thoroughly
a Is possible without the flow of
stimulants to freely used in other days.
Nearly everyone inthe city was awake
t the shifting: of the years, either by
iealgn or as the result of noise in
th neighborhood.
In the downtown district there were
virious frenzied efforts. In numerous
' &es successful, to make Joy reign.
From sources known to the initiated, a
more or less limited, supply of liquor
of Taxious grades made its appearance
lubricated the throats of a few cele
brants. Midnight Performance
In at least one theater a midnight
performance of a musical comedy was
jriven. the orchestra and audience at
the Elks Joining in recording the ad
vent of 1920 at the stroke of midnight.
The all-night restaurants and drinking
jiiius cic ncii pairunizen, young I
people largely predominating. John I
Barleycorn was generaly noticeable by
his absence except in isolated in
stances. Away from the business section the
celebration took a more serious nature.
Watch parties were held in many
homes, and watoh night services in
several of the churches. These were
well attended.. Society turned out en
niae to one or two large functions
where the occasion was celebrated
with some degree of show.
o
fiicniinun
r DM i ic
SIHdUULIIHUL UHLL IU
H TEH EVE EOT
ST THE CaUNTRY CLUB
Gayly welcoming the. New Tear, so
ciety gathered at the Country club
last evening, a brilliant masquerade
ttnw tha pvfint with which its mem
bers celebrated. The ga.yety reached
its height at miamgnt. wnen masKs
were discarded and every conceivable
noise maker was brought into play.
Confetti showered the ballroom and
serpentine twined In and out among
the dancers, the carnival spirit that
prevailed earlier In the evening being
accentuated by late arrivals who
Joined the masked dancers as the New
Tear dawned.
The clubhouse never presented a
more attractive scene. The holiday
colors were used in decoration and
formed a charming background for
the unusually effective costumes worn.
A low-cellinged effect was produced
by festoons of Christmas greens and
a touch of color in ' the scarlet
strands added to the charm. Holly and
mistletoe had place in the arrange
ments. '
"While many of the costumes were
decidedly clever the real fun resulted
from the fact that seven of the lead-
WALTER HASTINGS OLNEY
Head of the
Vocal Dept. Arizona School of Music
Voice Trial Free
By Appointment
Phone 1009
ing matrons chose to appear m identi
cal costumes even to wearing wigs ex
actly alike. As the seven are practi
cally of a size it was Impossible to
tell one from another. Mrs. Phil Lewis,
Mrs. Beeckman Lorrilard, Mrs. Celora
Martin Stoddard, Mrs. W.i Kings
bury, Mrs. Sydney J. Ross'rMrs. Ar
thur Dulmage and Mrs. Carleton Wood
all made charming little school girls
in .their blue gingham dresses. Theit
hair hung in curls and r. big blue bow
tied at a coquettish angle made them
the more charming. Silk socks and
Mary Janes completed their costumes.
Another little girl who looked espe
cially charming was Mrs. Charles
O'Malley, who wore a knee length
frock of white organdie.
Mrs. Donald Dunbar was an ador
able Puritan. Her gray frock ..was
properly subdued and had Just the
proper touch of white and black. Her
hair hung In braids and a demure gray
cap was a fetching feature of her
costume.
Mrs. Ernest Lewis wore a fascinat
ing gown of scarlet and gold appear
ing as October.
-Mrs. Lou lla Archer was handsome
as an Indian maid. She was costumed
In an Alaskan moose hide and an
Alaskan reindeer parka was worn as
a headdress.
Mrs. Jack Rowland made an inter
esting Egyptian dancing girl, her bril
liant coloring being set off to advan
tage In the becoming costume worn.
Mrs. Joseph 'Green, who has often
been said to greatly resemble Geral
dine Parcar, wore a costume copied
from one in which " Miss Farrar ap
peared in tie of her late pictures.
Mrs. Green's gown was shimmering
white elaborately adorned with se
quens and ostrich feathers. Her
headdress was of ostrich and bird of
Paradise.
Miss Henrietta Olney was one of
the most admired young women pres
ent. She wore an effective Hawaiian
costume and orange colored flowers
were worn in her hair.
The majority of the men appeared
in domlnos, although among the danc
ers was noted a more pretentious cos
tume. Donald Dunbar was among the
latter and his makeup as Buster Brown
was delicious. v
Charles Pope was another who
another masked, appearing as an
Alaskan Indian.
Not a. few wore their evening gowns
and masked Mrs. John H. Page being
among the number. Mrs. Page wore
a stunnig frock of cloth of gold with
a touch of color in rose and blue
velvet.
There were more than 100 at supper
which was served at - midnight and
which was followed by dancing. Among
the late - comers were Mr. and Mrs.
Barry Goldwater, Mr. and Mrs. George
0. Lutgerdlng. Mr. and Mrs. .Albert
Rosenberg, Mr. and Mrs. IL W. As
bury, Mr. and Mrs. Donald McQueen,
Mr. and Mrs. Garrett Schullar, Mr.
andJMrs. Aaron Goldberg, Mr. and Mrs.
Julian Holmes, Mr. and Mrs. Henry
George, Mr. and Mrs. David Goldberg,
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph: T. Melczer, and
Miss Ruth Goldberg.
EARTH TREMOR AT SAN DIEGO
SA-N DIEGO. Cal., Dec 31. A
slight earthquake tremor was felt
here early tonight. No damage re
sulted. Telephone reports from El
Centro, 100 miles east of here, said
the shock was perceptible there.
We Specialize
Restaurant Supplies
Coffee Urns
Ranges
Dishes both plain, hotel
and English vitrified
Glassware
Rolled steel cooking uten
sils and equipment.
Largest stock in Arizona
. "
We guarantee to please
you
BARROWS
FURNITURE CO.
WE HAVE IT
The World Famous
JOHNS
MANVILLE All Asbestos
AH Mineral
ROOFING
PHOENIX
ROOFING CO.
T. J. SMITH, Mgr.
323 W. Washington St
DONT FORGET
WOLFF or
EC0HLER
PLUMBING FIXTURES
In Tour Building Specifications
Insist on Guaranteed Enamelware
Fixtures
THERE ARE NO SECONDS!
6e these goods on display at
The J. H. Mulrein
Plumbing Supply Co.
(Incorporated)
428 S. Second Ave., Phoenix. Ariz.
A Large Stock of Plumbing , Fix
tures, Pipe-Fittings, Valves, Etc
We Take This
Opportunity
To thank our many friends arid customers for
the business you have given us and for the many
kindnesses extended, and
WISH YOU ONE AND ALL A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
OAKLAND
A TTT TT r77 Ov TT A
am. II I M 1 MM M X. alssm
JLT1X llJX LL-A W Jk y JL 11
SALES CO.
Distributors
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OAKLAND SENSIBLE SIX
306 N. Central Ave.
101
PROGRAM
E
OF HELEN STANLEY
Announcement has been made of the
program which Helen Stanley, prima
donna, will sing: at her concert next
Saturday night at the high school
auditroium under the auspices of the
Musical -Events club of , the valley.
Tickets for the concert are now on
sale at Kerr and Smalley's music store
and by members, at $2 each.
Following is the program, which
will be given with Ellmer Zoller at the
piano :
- V ' 1
S'inganna chi crede (Opera of Me
dora) .Sarti
New Iove ...Mendelssohn
Hush aby Birdie. Croon (Old Scotch
border nurse song) ..Arr. by Moffat
Maiden at the Spring ....C. Goldmark
2
Iaybreak .....Albert Mallinson
Don't Come in, Sir, Please . .Cyril Scott
The Response .AT. H. Brown
My Love Is a Muleteer ..F. de Nogero
3
Aria of Lenora (Les Regrets) from
"La Tasse" Godard
4
Promenade a Mule Foufdrain
Contemplation Widor
The Cuckoo Tschalkowsk
Nocturne (de Cantilenes ...Poldowskl
5 ,
My Menagerie Fay Foster
Twilight K. A. Glen
Sonny Boy Pearl Curran
I Know (dedicated to Mmer Stan
ley ..............& Ferrari
o
SOUTHAMPTON SHORTLY
TO BE A BIG PORT
SOUTHAMPTON This will shortly
be the regular British port for the five
largest steamships in the world
Leviathan, Imperator, Olympic, Maure
tania and Aquitania.
o
It makes no difference what your
wants may be you can have them sup
plied by using and reading The Repub
lican Classified Pages.
o
MILKEDvTO MUSIC
H. M. Harvey of Poughkeepsie, N.
T.. contends that music will induce a
cow to give more milk than she would
if not thus encouraged and soothed.
Tests have been made with Guernsey
and Holstein cows, and they, after be
ing milked dry, gave more milk when
an electrically operated phonograph
was started. f
Other cows were milked with the
phonograph playing continuously dur
ing the milking period, and gave from
10 to 12 per cent more milk than their
usual volume. ,
"The music which, accomplished this
feat was classical, all of a. slow meas
ured cadence," says the Milk News.
This may be the real sol ul ion for
the" high- cost - of living problem.
Who knows? A phonograph in every
hencoop might increase the supply -of
breakfast eggs. A piano in the pigpen
may produce larger slices of bacon.
!
for the first
two babies of 1920
A beautiful toilet set of three pieces, brush, comb and soap box,
daintily decorated with sprays of pink flowers and especially
designed for Baby, together with a generous box of Baby Talcum
Powder will be presented to the first two babies born in Phoe-s
nix in 1920.'
Winners will be decided by certificates of birth duly signed and
attested by attending physician such certificate designating the
exact time of birth, upon which priority can be established.
Daddy! bring this ad with you
The
Eagle Drug
E. C. STULTS, Prop.
Nat. Bank of Arizona Building
Store
Phone 3035
While Attorney General Palmer Is to the meat market and play a nice
busily now prosecuting food profiteers I tune while the butcher is weighing
you might tote the family phonograph j your Sunday roast. For if classical
music can draw milk out of a cow
what not could a jazzy bit of music do
to the grocer or meat seller?
1920A: Year of
Promise
At the first of a new year, it is always
pleasant to review the gains of the past,
and to look forward with renewed con
fidence and energy into the future.
1919 has brought to The Valley Bank, as
well as all of the other Banks of the Salt
River Valley, an unprecedented increase
in volume of business.
Our deposits have increased during the
year from about 4,000,000 to more than
$6,000,000. More important still, we
have enlarged our field of service
through the acquisition of hundreds of
new customers. .
Our several thousand friendly customers
have steadfastly shown a warm interest
in our success, and practically all of the
new business which we have gained dur-
ing the year has been the result of their
' -
unstirited efforts to help us make prog
ress. 1
To. these friends we desire to record our
deep sense of appreciation.
To all those who know how to earn a
dollar, and to spend or invest it wisely
who believe in thrift, energy, and hard
work who are sincerely striving to
forge ahead financially, we offer this
cordial invitation to join the ranks of our
satisfied customers.
Let 1920 stand as the year in which you
"found yourself" and started on the road
to Independence.
And give us all officers and staff the
personal satisfaction of knowing that
The Valley Bank has had a part in this
program.
' THE VALLEY BANK ,
PHOENIX, ARIZONA " "
Capital and Surplus 600,000.00 Member of Federal Reserve System

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