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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, July 01, 1920, Image 9

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PAGE NINE
Jt2 "lores ts
Hoyseholdy Children jq CooICinf P5p Fashion
i HE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 1, 1920
i
1
Adventur&s
P 7m& TWINS
.ly dive Iarti.yU;,
"Wee. wee. wee!" cried Mrs. Woodchuck's children, and Tingaling and the
twfns (who were about to rush outside to capture Wally Woodchuck) stopped
In amazement.
Are your sure those are your children?" asked Tingling.
"Sure!" answered Mrs. Woodchuck indignantly. 'Do you think I'd go .to
the trouble of bringing up my neighbor's? We have enough to do to feed our
selves." "No doubt that's true," said TIngaling quickly, "in fact, I may as well tell
you, Mrs. Woodchuck, that my little friends and I heard only today that your
husband Wally had put out the children to shift for themselves, as he wished
all the food for himself!"
Tou can go upstairs, and see then," answered Mrs. Woodchuck tartly, "if
H four children aren't safe and sound In bed, I'll stew my new spring hat for
dinner, and I like it pretty well, being the most becoming one I ever owned,"
So up they trooped, all of them, and peered into the bedroom. But they
; ; - : - i
So up trooped the twins and Tingaling, and peered into the bedroom.
were to have the surprise of their lives, for not only were the little chucks all
In bed, but who should be rocki'ng them and singing (In a voice about as soft
and sweet as the electric cleaner when it's going), but Wally Woodchuck him
self, and looking like pie. He was singing
"Hush-a-bye, my little ground diggers.
With wooliken fur and such fat little figgers; (
Daddy will watch by the button-tree high.
And chase Mister Fox should be chance to come ni'gh."
He pretended not to see the people crowding into the room, and seemed
awfully surprised when the fairyman landlord shook his bells and said Ahem
quite loudly. .
"Why, I declare!" yawned Wally. "Did you get tired waiting for the sassa
fras for your tea, folks? I heard the children fussing, so I came upstairs,
was nearly asleep myself."
Tingaling looked stern. He knew Wally was not telling the truth.
m ft.
I
L
otiiessKmsota
i
THE BOOK OF ANN
Chrys Advises Me to Take Ives Away
from Ann
"I mean Just this," Chrys said. "Ann
will keep right on flirting with Ives
she will never heed what we tell her
and all too soon well get the disagree
able results. The only way out is for
you to take her conquest away from
her. Goodness! How hurt her pride
will be! And thus will end Mr. Ives'
cause forever!"
"Of all distressing schemes, Chrys!
Why, if Bob should miscojtrue it,
should misunderstand, what a future I
would face! Bob wouldn't divorce me!
Oh, no! He'd keep me tied like a
convict, the rest of my days!'
"Nonsense! As Bob's twin, I guess
I know him. He has his moods, but
thev always pass!"
T wouldn't risk this. Chrys. Go to a
detective asrency. Hire a substitute.'
it simolv can't be done. Ives takes
particular prife in the social status of
Vi r-irls he fascinates. He claims to
have temperament. Maybe he has.
feel sure, my dear, that youll have an
easy Job. Ives will worry mignty m-
Ives at all! You recall his romantic
history, as related by Ann lately?
Some nonsense about his being the
son of a French sculptor, and an Amer
ican singer, born in London, and
brought up in Greece? Say. my dear:
Ciaude Ives is really Jacob Smart. He
was born in Ashton, Arkansas, and his
father was a sausage mixer. So the
'grease' part is straight, hey?"
"Can I tell Ann?" I asked eagerly.
"She's so dramatic she'll hate it so
she'll be cured for good, I guess!" I
could have collapsed in tears of joy,
thinking I was released from my job
as chief rescuer of Ann.
. "Wait!" paid daddy in my ear, as if
he were imparting a secret. "Wait?
I'm going to make this town too warm
for that guy! Don't scare the bird, my
dear."
"Very well, daddy," I agreed as I
dropped out of the car at my own side
door. I hated the whole affair. I had
let Chrys persuade me too easily.
What would Bob say?
I picked up the receiver of the phone
and called Bob's office. His secretary
reported that he had gone out to try
a new roadster, that he would be gone
about an hour.
I hung up the receiver feeling very
wretched indeed and put on my chic
riding apparel knowing that I would
much prefer to put on a kitchen apron
and make the soup for my husband s
supper.
(To Be Continued)
o
THREE OF HIS WIVES
PUT IN GOOD WORD
LON'DOX All George H. Meace's
wives", spoke well of him in court
here on a charge of bigamy. Meaco
had three living and one dead. Meace
has several war decorations. He is
held for trial.
o
WIFE CLAIMS HER
HUSBAND SOLD HER
LONDON Mary Pearman says her
husband. sold her to a man named
Jones at a tea shop. Albert Pearman,
she told the court, took her to the tea
shop and threatened to "do her in" if
she didn't sign a document to leave
Fearman's house and board for Jones'.
KING ALBERT MAY
TAKE TO THE AIR
BRUSSELS "It is obvious people
must fly," said Albert, king of the Bel
gians, and accepted a Bristol airplane
as a gift from the Handley-Page com
pany. He said he wanted bigger fuel
tanks and dual ignition but no royal
decorations.
o
TAR NOTE PUZZLES
WOMAN AND POLICE
TOLEDO Mrs. L. W. Davis can't
understand why a note smeared with
tar and reading "Mrs. Davis behavo
or you'll get this," should have been
pinned to her door here. The police
are trying to find out.
o
GOLFERS CHASE BALLS IN AUTOS
SAN DIEGO Golfers at the Country
club here are chasing the ball around
the links in automobiles.
o
CAN ..WITHOUT SUGAR
tie about losing the friendship of Jim's
child-wife when he sees that he can
intrigue a certain experienced, but
correct, irreproachable, and elegant
young society matron."
"Meaning me by all that?
"Exactly. Tou are to Ann, in a flir
tation, as champagne to new beer. Now
Jane, remember your pet theory: never
run away from a duty no matter now
it repels you.'
"According to that, I suppose you'd
have me start this minute and gallop
over all the bridle paths of the coun
try in pursuit of Ann and her escort.
"That's my very sensible sugges
tion " Chrys agreed. "I suppose you
and I had better manage this with
out a word to Bob. or daddy or
mother?"
"We'll save the little goose in spite
of herself and keep the secret.
"Jane, you're a good sport. If
could be really fond of a woman, I'd
be awfully fond of you." Chrys tapped
my shoulder with gentle approval, and
I started home to get into my namg
toes.
At the gate. I met Daddy Lorimer
coming from town In Tits car.
"Daughter." he called, then he mo
tioned me to a seat beside himself and
ordered, the chauffeur to drive to my
house.
"Daughter!" he repeated as he pulled
a letter from his pocket. The sight of
it made him chuckle as If It were some
splendid joke. "I'm after that decora
tor chap strong. See what I've got
first thing. His name Isn't Claude
Uncle Joe Exhibits
His Galluses
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'UACLE OfX I - 1l
CHICAGO "Just like a circus," said
"Uncle Joe" Cannon, vet congressman,
as he watched the goings on of the
Republican national convention. And
when the sessions bejpxn to get warm
he removed his coat and sat with his
galluses right out in public view. Can
non is only E4 years old and says the
youngsters are entitled to front seTs.
He had one.
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1 HOKIE AMD ) DrP VONEeTHIS L
folk that Abraham Lincoln spent Ions
hours lying on his stomach stuflyins
heavy books, and that Benjamin
Franklin led a toilsome youth. Th
young aspirant is taught to believe that
he too may becom a Lincoln or a
Franklin if he will only work hnrd
enough. There is nothing in it. If he
is endowed by nature with a preat
brain he has but to follow his inclina
tion in order to develop it, and if he is
not so endowed, no amount of work
can make him anything hut a medi
ocrity. Indeed, hard grinding, effort
is rather worse than useless. It is
only when you are really interested
and therefore working without sensa
of effort that you are developing yor
brain, for only then does the blood
feed it properly. The thing to do Is t
find what interests you and then do it
for the Joy of doing it. If you fail to
achieve greatness it will not be because
you did not work hard enough. The
world is full of fools who are work
ing their heads off and making neither
fame nor wealth.
A BURST OF PRECOCITY
which he most
By Frederic J. Haskin ,
NEW YORK, June 22. With chil
dren nine to twelve years of age writ
ing books and contributing to the
magazines, boys just out of college and
boarding school writing realistic novels
which cause sensations In literary cir
cles, and a dramatist in his twenties
setting a new standard for the Ameri
can stage, the English speaking world
is witnessing a remarkable display of
precocious talent.
The first and best known of these
young wonders is the now famous
Daisy Ashford, whose book, attested
by James Barry to have been written
at the age of nine, has sold In enor
mous numbers. But Daisy Ashford
does not really belong to this group of
precocities, for her Jbook was written
long ago . and she is now a grown
woman. Furthermore, it sounds like
the work of a child of nine, and Is In
teresting chiefly as a curiosity. The
same is true of several child authors
who have sought to emulate her suc
cess, one of whom is publishing in a
leading American highbrow magazine.
Their work is undoubtedly remark
able for children, but it is not of any
considerable literary value.
A great deal more Interesting Is the
group of what might be called "boy
novelists" from seventeen to twenty
three years of age, who have recently
published works of realistic fiction hat
win the praise of the most conserva
tive critics. This group is. especially
appealing. For a long time the gray
beards have held the limelight in liter
ature or If not the graybeards at least
the mature. As the study of any bio
graphical dictionary will show, few
writers produce anything that attracts
attention before the age of thirty, and
few make much of a reputation or get
a wide hearing until they are near
forty. This means that a man gen
erally does not succeed In lmpresslns
himself on his fellows until he Is past
his youth. It means that In litera
ture as in almost everything else, this
is a world dominated by the mature
and the old, against whom youth
struggles for Its ideals and its desires
largely in vain. It has been pointed
out many times that old men make
the wars and young men fight them
It might be said with almost equal
truth that old men make the laws and
young people have to obey them, the
old generally being strong enough to
pet around them. It Is likewise the
old and the mature who fix social cus
tom and convention, and it Is the
young upon whom these restrictions
press most heavily. Every father is
bent on srfving his sons from the vices
enjoys, and every
mother seeks carefully to guard her
daughter from the indiscretions which
made her own youth romantic and in
teresting. All of us have a powerful
penchant for saving the other fellow's
soul, and the old indulge this penchant
constantly upon the young. .
This burst of youthful genius there
fore means nothing less than a revolt
of youth, and a successful one, against
the inhibitions which age has sought
to lay upon it. These young men have
demanded a hearing and they have
gotten it. They have told all the
world how the world looks to a human
insect who has just emerged from the
cocoon of a formal education and is
about to try his wings in the more or
less free air of civilized society. All
of them have a great deal to say about
the kind of education which the ciders
have provided for them, and all of
them have something to say about
love and marriage. Education and
sex are about the only things of which
they' have any experience, but on these
subjects their opinions are emphatic
and passionate.
Boy Geniuses Here and Abroad
The youngest of the boy novelists is
an English lad named Alec Waugh,
who has written a novel setting forth
his experiences in the British schools.
His book is commended by critics as a
really brilliant performance, and he
finds going to school on the whole a
barbarous and futile business. He
was only seventeen years old when his
book was written.
His fellow genius on this side is F.
Scott Fitzgerald who at the age of 23
has gritten a novel of life in a high
class American "prep" school, and at
Princeton, which has run through
several editions and attracted the wid
est attention. Fitzgerald"-? hero found
his school and college life amusing,
but he does not record that he learned
anything of importance there. He de
scribes Princeton as a delightful coun
try club where everything possible was
done to make a correct snob of him.
He also tried to get married but failed
because he had not enough money.
The girl with whom he fell in love
was the typical American debutante,
trained for nothing except the career
of a very pampered and extravagantly
kept woman. This recalcitrant hero
also goes to war and he does not like
war any better than he did love or edu
cation. He finds everything all wrong
and ends by becoming a socialist on
the ground that he has everything to
gain and nothing to lose by a radical
change in the existing order, of things.
A very similar book is that of
Robert Nathan, who takes life at Har
vard as his theme, and whose hero also
dabbles in marriage and radicalism.
He also finds human society to be
badly arranged and conducted.
All of this youthful literature sounds
the same note. Formal education, it
says, is a hollow farce and love Is a
mercenary fizzle. The same idea in
a slightly different form runs through
Eugene O'Neil's famous play, "Hon
zona." Although a few years older
than the novelists, O'Neil cannot have
been more than 23 or 24 when he wrote
his play, for he was a long time get
ting it produced. It Is the story of
an aspiring young man isolated on a
typical American farm. His hopes are
crushed and he is finally killed by the
routine of labor and the restrictions of
marriage. O'Neil joins Nathan and
Fitzgerald in saying that organized
society meets the youth of imagination
and ideals with a club.
Does Early Budding Btar Fruit?
It is a widely held popular idea that
the prococious young person is a weed
of rank and brief growth that he is
apt to run his course quickly. But
no scientific support can be found for
this notion. Francis Gal ton in his
sjudy of hereditary genius records
that a large number of the world's
great creative minds showed their abil
ity at an early age. Donaldson In his
"Growth of the Brain" says that an
early development of mental power
usually indicates also a capacity for
prolonged growth. These young men
have the very best of opportunities
for high and long-continued achieve'
merit. The greatest danger to which
they are exposed, so far as genuine
achievement is concerned, is that the
commercial publishing Interests will
thwart their development by inducing
them to do cheap and hasty work. This
is the process which has ruined more
writers in America than any other.
hat scientific literature we can
find on precocity and mental develop
ment also knocks a hole in another
popular idea that hard work will ac
complish almost anything in the way
of development. The authorities are
agreed that the quality of a man's
achievement depends far more on the
innate character of his brain cells than
on his education, training or effort
toward self-improvement. It has long
been the custom to point out to young
8 fe
EES
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SEEN TWO TROUSER
LEGS WALKIN' 'ROUND?
SEATTLE The police are looking
for A. Zolla's trousers' legs. Zolla
left the legs on the end of the pants
over the end of his bed. In the dead
of night somebody filched 'em. There
was $154 tucked under the tucks of
the right hand foot, of the trousers.
BANS WOMEN SPIES
THEY FALL IN LOVE
LONDON The next time there is a
war Captain Ferdinand Tuohy thinks
there should be no women spies em
ployed. "They fall in love too easily,
he says in his book called "The Sec
ret Corps," just published here.
o
GERMANS SEIZE TWO
MILLION IN SILVER
COPENHAGEN Two million dol
lars in filver bars was seized hero by
German authorities, according to news
paper reports. The money was being
smuggled from Germany in cattle
cars by Frenchmen, "it is said.
o
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Helen Taft, daughter of the cx
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III 1 iLi

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