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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, September 06, 1920, Image 1

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ZONA
"TP A TS.T
I f M f i 1 X
U a 11
AM INDEPENDENT PROGRESS3VE JOURNAL
VOL. XXXI., NO. 1P'!
THIRTY-FIRST YEAR
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 6, 1920
14 PAGES
U PAGKS
AR
rim
r. J Elk 1 . Z
JO?
LITHUANIANS OPEN
ARTILLERY ATTACK
ON POLISH SECTOR
Conflicting Reports from
Heated Sector Place Re
sponsibility for Attack
With Lithuanians
Republican A. P. Leased Wire
WARSAW, Sept. 5 An attack on
ra&jccice guns nl artillery in the re
gion ot Seiny, 35 miles northwest of
Grodno, is announced in Polish reports
trom the northern front. The reports
declare the- attack was unprovoked and
that the Lithuanians had received or
ders to occupy Ausrustowo.
The Polish press comments on the
Lithuanian action as inexplicable, as
the provisional frontier between Poland
and Lithuania has not yet been reached
by the Poles. The latter contend that
the Lithuanians are occupying- several
localities on the Polish side of the fron
tier. It is also announced that nego
tiations regarding the frontier and the
future relations of Poland and Lithu
ania have been broken off and that the
Polish delegates are returning to War
paw. These delegats comprise a special
mission which went to Kovno about a
month ago to confer with the Lithu
anians. It is said the supreme council
lias been informed that the Lithuanians
propose a new line of demarkation
running through Marggrabowa, Augus
towo and Szuczyn. It is understood the
Lithuanian government places the
responsibility for the clash upon the
Poles, asserting that the Lithuanians
were compelled to defend themselves-.
The Poles claim the Lithuanians
opened fire first.
Tonight's Polish communique asserts
that the attack by Lithuanians upon
the Poles was in pursuance of an un
derstanding between "the Lithuanians
and the Russian bolsheviki. The state
ment saya the Lithuanians have crossed
the Curzon line, the tentative Polish
boundary drawn by the allies, without
declaring .war.
With regard to the Polish-Russian
fighting the statement announces that
between Wlodawa and . Dubienka, on
the center of the front, the Russians
launched an attack to force a crossing
of the Bug, but were repulsed. It is
asserted that the Poles have learned
that at Brzec the Russians were com
pelled to fight under the pressure of
machine guns from the rear.
In the region of Belets, on the old
Galacian border, the Poles are advanc
ing and repeatedly breaking the soviet
resistance.
To the cast of Lemberg the Poles
have occupied the railwray junction of
Kresne after hard fightin.'
Negotiations Broken Off
It was announced in Lithuanian ad
vices on September 5, negotiations be
tween the Poles and Lithuanians over
the boundary had been broken off, the
Lithuanians asking the Polish at Kocno
to leave Lithuanian territory. This
action, the Lithuanian advices stated,
followed a Polish attack upon Lithuan
ian troops near Augustowo.
Lithuanians Take Seiney
PARIS, Sept. 5 Lithuanian forces
have occupied Seiney, it was report
ed to the French foreign office today.
The foreign office explained that
dispute between the Poles and
Lithuanians arises from the fact that
the recent peace treaty between the
Moscow and Lithuanian governments
is in conflict as regards national
boundaries with the line tentatively
laid down for Poland by the allies
last December.
WRANGLE ATTACK WINS.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Sept. 4 The
counter attack of General Wrangle,
(Continued on Page Two).
LATE TELEGRAPH BRIEFS
POLISH SUPPLIES LANDED
BERLIN, Sept. 5. Danzig dispatcher announce that the first transport
load of munitions destined for Poland crossed the territory of the free city of
Danzig yesterday. There was no interterence wiui ui vass
SIX NAVAL PRISONERS ESCAPED
vat.LEJO. Calif.. Sept. 5. Six naval prisoners who fled from the Mare
Island navy yard today after overpowering their guards and arming themselves
witn pistols and ammuniiton, engaged in a gun fight with a military posse of
Zo sailors and marines at a bridge one mile and a half above Cordelia, Calif.,
" -,iiT, in renorts here tonierht. Two marines were shot and the fugitives
were overpowered and captured and are being returned here, it was said
DISASTROUS PHILIPPINE TYPHOON
MANILA Sept. 5. Arrivals from
caused heavy damage to army property
cers quarters
The only communication
51 ARRESTS
BELFAST, Sept. 5. Fifty-one arrests were made under the curfew law in
Reifa;t last night. Suburban roads were
who stopped 'all motorists.
ARMY RECRUITING
WASHINGTON, Sept. 5. Army
records in August, according to a
Harris, showing 19,242
15.2S1.
enlistments
FIVE DIE IN TROLLEY WRECK
FAIRMONT, W. Va., Sept. 5. Five persons were killed and a score injured,
pome of them seriously early today when a trolley car collided with a freight
car carrying building materials near Baxter station.
AMERICANS WIN PARIS OLYMPIC
PARIS. Sept. 5. The American athletes made a clean sweep in the water
contests of the "Paris Olympic" today. Duke Kahanamoku broke the world's
record for the 100 metres swim, covering the distance in one minute flat.
MOVIE ACTOR DIES
NKW YORK, Sept. 5. Robert Harron. widely known motion picture actor,
died in a hospital today from a wound inflicted when he accidently shot him
self on Sept. 1. He was unpacking a trunk in his apartment when a revolver
he was taking from a coat pocket fell to the floor ami was discharged. Harron,
who rose from an office boy in the David W. Griffith office here to stardom,
was 27 years of age.
POSTAL CLERKS WANT INCREASE
CINCINNATI, Sept. 5. Postoffice clerks are dissatisfied with salary in
creases granted to them recently by congress and will take action at the an
nual convention of the United National association of postoffice clerks which
opens here tomorrow to renew their former ciemanus.
ANOTHER MACSWINEY PROTEST
ST. LOUIS. Sept. 5. Mayor Henry W. Kiel of St. Louis, tonight sent a
cablegram to Premier Lloyd George asking him "not to permit Lord Mayor
MacSwiney to die." The mayor's action was taken at the request of a number
of Irish sympathizers here.
PIKE'S PEAK AUTO RACE TODAY
COLORADO SPRINGS. Colo.. Sept. 5. Monday morning win see thou
sands of automobile enthusiasts on their way to the summit of Pike's Peak
i,v cog road ;id motor to witness the double finish of the rare to the crest
by four airplanes" from Denver and upward of 16 racing curs in their da&h
against time to the summit or , the rjtpcv,tr&phy.
FORMER AMERICAN
ARMY LIEUTENANT
DIES IN COBLENZ
COELKNZ, Sept. 4. The body of
Nathaniel F. Davis of Duluth, Minn.,
formerly a lieutenant in the Ameri
can army, and recently an Ameri-
";r rnprpcr fltat ive With the
Ithineiand hin commission, was
found on the bank of the Rhine
near here today. Lieutenant Davis
had been missing for a week. Some
bruises were found on the body but
the money anl jewelry of the dead
man were intact.
Lieutenant Davis had expected
to be married soon to an English
girl now in France.
COX AGAIN OFFERS
LE
F
Republican A. P. Leased Wire
CHICAGO. Sept. 5 While spending
Sunday here on his western tour, Gov
ernor Cox interested himself in the
senate committee investigation of Re
publican campaign funds and this eve
ning gave out a statement intended to
furnish the committee with leads to
substantiate his charge that a $15,000,
000 fund is being raised by the Re
publican committee "to buy the
presidency."
In his statement Governor Cox
charged that attempts had been made
to levy a quota of $80,000 on Chicago
coal dealers and suggested the names
of persons whom the committee might
call to substantiate his charge.
"Inasmuch as I could not stay to
furnish the information," the governor
said, T thought I would le,ave a few
leads for the committee."
The governor's statement was in the
form of a question directed to Will H.
Hays in which he asks Mr. Hays
"whether he knows anything of a
quota or assessment on Chicago coal
men for $80,000 at a meeting on the
ninth floor of the Congress hotel, early
in the summer."
"If the circumstance is not fresh In
Mr. Havs' mind, he might call on
George McArto, E. E. Fyke, Robert H.
Zoller, James Forester of Duquoin, 111.,
or Rice Miller of Hillsboro. 111."
The governor stated that "some
Democrats were in the meeting and
they demurred."
Among those who conferred today
with the governor were Senator
Thomas J. Walsh of Montana, chair
man of the senatorial campaign com
mittee. Stuart R. Smith of Beaumont,
Texas, and Charles E. Stubbs of Bil
lings. Mont.
Governor Cox was met here today by
Mrs. Cox and Baby Anne and his son-in-law
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. D.
J. Mahoney of Dayton.
The governor left tonight for St.
Paul and Minneapolis. Minn., where
he is scheduled to make a number of
speeches tomorrow.
HUERTA WILL VISIT
MEX HEALTH RESORTS
MEXICO CITY. Sept. 5 Provisional
President de la Huerta is leaving Mex
ieo City during the coming week for
a two-weeks visit to cuernavaca. tm-
ebla and Guadalajara owing to ill
health, according to announcement in
today's newspapers.
Corregidor Island say Tuesday's typhoon
there, unroofing barracks of the offi
with Corregidor is by steamer.
IN BELFAST
held today by the military and police,
BREAKS RECORD
recruiting . again broke all peace time
statement tonight by Adjutant Genertu
for the month. July enlistments were
CAMPAIGN
ID
PROBE
Italian Metal s
Workers Seize
Several Plants
Reputi.1...-. .". Leased Wire
PARIS, Sept. 5 Dealing wnn il...
situation created by the seizure cf
facories by metal workers i-i sever
al Italian cities, a Havas aqency
dispatch from Rome today says:
"The government, although con
scious of the seriousness of the sit
uation, is continuinq to refrain
from regarding the present demon
strations too gravely, retaining con
fidence in the good sense of the
workers and the conciliatory spirit
"In Milan t'ie police drove off a
party of workers which was at
tempting to seize control of a fac
tory. "The employers and workers at
Viaregqic have reached an aaree
ment and work will be resumed im
mediately." terencTmacswiney
passes 24th day of
his hunger she
LONDON, Sept. 4 Terence McSwin
ey, lord mayor of Cork, entered the
twenty-fourth day of his hunger strike
in Brixton prison today after a fairly
restful night. His brother, Sam Mc
Swiney remained at the bedside all
night.
Father Dominic, private chaplain to
the mayor, administered the secrament
this morning. A mass for the release
or happy death of the prisoner was held
in the Roman Catolic church in Maid
en Lane. According to the Weekly
Dispatch, Father Denis Mathieu, a Ben
edictine priest of French origin, who1
has resided ii England for forty years
and officiateVI at McSwiney's marriage,
brought him some water from Lourdes
yesterday. The prisoner, however, was
too weak to see his visitor. '
Tonight the mayor's condition is un
changed. He was a trifle brighter to
ward noon, but his wife, who spent the
afternoon with him. reported this eve
ning he wajs again in pain and suffer
ing from depressi on. MacSwiney. today
reecived'a message signed by the pres
ident and secretary of the Urban dis
trict council conveying in behalf of the
townspeople, "heartfelt sympathy."
Chaplain Dominic left the mayor at
9 o'clock tonight. He reported that
the mayor had occasional fits of dizzi
ness, but had not lost consciousness.
o
ELEVEN PRISONERS
ON 28-DAY HUNGER
STRIKE IN IRELAND
BELFAST, Sept. 5 The 11 hunger
strikers in the Cork jail today entered
the twenty-sixth day of their absti
nence from food, having subsisted only
on water. The condition of Michael
O'Reilly 13 critical and he is unable to
speak to visitors. The period these
men have gone without food is a rec
ord for Irish prisoners. The longest
previous hunger strike lasted 23 days.
It was stated that their relatives are
allowed to visit' them whenever they
choose.
The Cork Nurses' association has of
fered to attend the hunger striking
patients day and night free. It was
asserted, however, that the deputy lord
mayor has been unable to arrange an
acceptance of this offer by the prison
authorities.
GERMAN SOCIALISTS
CRITICIZE SOVIETS
BERLIN, Sept. 3 Soviet Russia was
unfavorably citicised by speakers who
addressed the party conference of the
independent socialists which met today
to discuss the Moscow Internationale.
"Whatever our sentiments toward
the Russians may be, the fact remains
that they have not given proof that
they are able to establish socialism
in their country," said Prof. Karl JJal
lod, who has just returned from Russia.
"I once was of the opinion that soviet
Russia and Germany could support one
another economically, but I now have
abandoned this opinion," he told the
German radicals. He was pessimistic
regarding Russia's food resources. The
entire Volga region, he asserted, would
yield only enough grain for seed."
Professor Ballod urgently advised
against recommending that German
workers settle in Russia.
Industrial production of soviet Rus
sia, he said, has fallen to about one
sixth of its former volume. This, he
explained, is due partially to a lack of
raw materials. The sugar industry, he
said, has wholly collapsed while coal
production in the Doretz basin is onlv
one-sixth of the former yield.
Professor Ballod said 'he believed in
the idealism of the soviet leaders but
asserted they had proven themselves
wholly incapable of effecting an eco
nomic restoration of Russia.
Bureaucracy in soviet Russia, he de
clared, is as bad as it was under the
czar and is on the ascendancy. A ma
jority of the independent leaders ex
pressed themselves as opposed to union
with Moscow. George Ledebour was
warmly applauded when he charged
the Moscow government with carrying
on "dangerous anti-socialistic poli
cies," in their own country which
showed them unqualif icd to assume
international leadership or dictate
terms to others.
NEW JOURNAL IN GENEVA
GENEVA, Sept. 5 A new journal,
with a policy of open opposition to the
league of nations, will attempt publi
cation in Geneva in November when
the first meeting of the league is to be
held here. The pro.iei ted publication is
sponsored hv in telle t uals of various
countries v.-ho are asainst the treaty or
Versailles.
NEWSPAPERS CONSOLIDATE
! MANILA. Sept. 5. The Philippines
j Herald, an English language morning
j liewsjia per recent!-.- established by
i Filipinos. ha.H purchased t'ab'e
I ws America. . Th pn'- announced
j was l ivnrt. TIi- p i - '.1;;.,!;(i.ted
i wj.-j) -! .. 4 , r . af-er hs The
' PJaiiii- J,nd Cable News.
1 III ROUTE
ESTABLISHED BY
QSTAL SERVICE
STARTS SEPT. 8
(Trip from New York to San
Francisco Will Be Made
In 56 and One-Half Hours
Republican A. P. Leased Wire
WASHINGTON. Sept. 5 Air mail
service between New York and San
Francisco will be inaugurated by the
postoffice department Wednesday, the
first planes leaving each terminus at
5:30 a. m. local time.
Complete plans and schedules for the
coast-to-coast service announced today
by the department, show that the mail
planes from New York to San Francis
co are expected to make the trip in
fiftv-six and one-half hours elapsed
time, and the San Francisco to New
York planes in sixty and one-half
hours elapsed time. Mail sent by train
from New York to San Francisco reach
es the latter city in about 100 hours,
and San Francisco mail arrives by train
in New York in about 96 hours.
The westward bound air mail under
the summer schedule will leave New
York at 5:30 a. m. and arrive in Chica
go at 2:30 r. m. and Iowa City at 4:08
p. m. Leaving Iowa City the next day
at 5:30 a. m.. the mail will reach Omaha
at 8:43 a. m. and Rock Springs, Wyo.,
at 5:25 p.m. Leaving Rock Springs the
next morning at 5:30 a. m. on the last
lap, Reno is to be readied at 12:30 p.
m. and the mail delivered to the San
Francisco postal authorities at 2 p. m.
Eastward mail under the summer
schedule will leave San Francisco at
5:30 a. m- arrive at Salt Lake at 2:15
p. m. and Rock Springs at 4:37 p. m.
The mail will leave Rock Springs the
next morning at 5:30 a. m. and reach
Iowa City at 6:21 p. m. The start on
the last lap from Iowa City will be
made at 5:30 a. m. Chicago will be
reached at 8:05 a. m. and the mail
turned over to the New York postal
authorities at 6 p. m.
The winter schedules are- similar ex
cept that starts from New York and
San Francisco will be made at 6:30 a.
m. instead of 5:30 a. m. On westward
trips on the winter schedule, Chicago
instead of Iowa City, and Cheyenne in
stead of Rock Springs, will be the over
night stops. Mail eastward bound in
winter will lay over night at Salt Lake
instead of Rock Springs, and at Chi
cago instead of Iowa City.
Use Metal Monoplanes
Metal monoplanes with a cruisirrg ra
dius of ten hours at ninety miles an
hour will be operated between New
York and Omaha, with a single stop for
gassing at Chicago. De Haviland-,
Four nlanes with four hours fuel and
oil at eighty miles an hour will re used
between Omaha and San 1- rancisco.
Pointing out that inauguration of
the new air service will extend the air
mail service over 1,463 miles of new
territory, the postoffice department in
its announcement said:
"With the establishment of trie trans
continental mail there will be at the
service of the United States military
forces what is probably the greatest
system of regularly maintained landing
fields and facilities in the world, a sys
tem that will enable the movement of
air fleets from ocean to ocean with
large landing fields and fueling and re
pair facilities approximately every 200
miles.
"The trans-continental daily airmail
will be the most difficult flying project
yet undertaken. Not only has it re
quired the working out of details for a
daily operation of a route nearly 3.000
miles long, but the actual flying will be
under the most trying conditions. At
Cheyenne, Salt Lake City and Reno the
daily flying with a full load of mail
will" have to be at altitudes ranging
from 12,000 to 14,000 feet above sea
level and over high windswept plateaus
with powerful head winds to cut down
the speed of the planes. Intense cold
weather will be encountered as well as
snow, and against these contingencies
all advance preparations possible have
been made. Powerful radio stations
for communication with the planes in
the mounntain sections have been in
stalled at Reno, Salt Lake City, Chey
enne and Omaha.
JAPANESE ASK FREE
o-
111
TOKIO, Sept. 5. Marquis Okuma in
receiving the party of visiting Ameri
can congressmen today asked that
Japan be given a free hand in Korea
nnri rtiina. where her intentions, ha
km id were directed toward the better
ment of conditions. Sixty years had
elansed without the unification of the
civilizations of the east and the west
for which he had constantly striven,
said the Marquis, but he was convinced
eventually that would materialize.
The immigration question bristles
with difficulties, he tald, but he was
hopeful of an amiable solution because
he had faith in the intelligence of the
American legislatures. Japan, he
pointed out, had acquiesced in the
American annexation of Hawaii and
the occupation of the Philippines, ac
cepting the explanation that it was for
the benefit of the people affected.
Similarly, he added, America should
recognize Japan's good intentions i-i
Korea fnd Siberia.
ROOM STRIKE
REACHING NORMAL
NKW YORK. Sept. .".With the
strike on the i'.iooklyti Rapid Transit
system entering its second week today,
strict car. subway and elevated service
reached a statie only a little short of
normal accord inar to reports of inspee
tor of 'he public service commission.
Two men were killed and seven
ethers iniii!-"d ;da..- as an indirect re-
of the
c strike when ; strii.'- emer-.;n-ryt:r-r
piifsenser- ;:p
j.i ! luikh n. skidded in
mother or. mid run over the
crashing into a store front.
J-C!!--
i i-f -r. . i ;t
1 sidewalk.
KOREA
I
CHI
BETTERMENT
Submarine S-5
Again Anchors
On Sea Bottom
Republican A. P. Leased Wire
PHILADELPHIA. Sept. 5 The
crew of the sunken submarine S-5
oiven a holiday today. Before
leavinq tne n.y visit their
friends they offered to do a "eras,!,
dive" at the yard to prove, they
said, that their commander was not
to blame- for the accident. One
member of the crew went to New
York to see his wife and a baby
that was born whi; its father was
held prisoner under the surface of
the ocean. Three of the thirty-five
survivors were stili in the navy
hospital tonight, but they were re
ported to be on the way to recov
ery. The S-5, which yesterday again
broke away from the battleship
Ohio and sank in 150 feet of water
off the Deiaware capes, was still at
the bottom of the sea tonight.
o
STATE DEPARTMENT
WILL IT PROTEST
I
NEW YORK, Sept. 5 Peter J. Mac
Swiney, brother of the lord mayor of
Cork, tonight made public a copy of
a letter which he said he had received
from the state department at Washing
ton, setting forth that it was "not in a
position to make protestations to the
British authorities" against the lord
mayor's arrest. Mr. MacSwiney had
requested the state department to in
tervene in his Brother's behalf.
The letter, dated August 24, said:
"The receipt of your letter of Au
gust 18, 1920, and your telegram of Au
gust 21, 1920, is acknowledged calling
the department's attention to the al
leged arrest and imprisonment of your
brother Terence MacSwiney by the
British authorities.
"In reply. I beg to inform you that
from precedent established in cases of
this kind.thedepartmnitefnds
this kind, the department finds it is
not in a position to make protestations
to the British authorities against the
arrest and imprisonment of one, who,
like your brother, is not a citizen of the
United States.
"I beg to remain, sir.
"G. HOWL AND SHAW,
"For the Secretary of State."
News of the death of Mayor Mac
Siney was expected momentarily by his
brother.
T believe this is the last," Peter
said. "I have been anxiously waiting
all day for the news of his death. I
guess Terence cannot last much longer.
JIl-SliGTSTS
F
TO TEST NEW L
WASHINGTON. Sept. 5. Four
methods to be used by anti-suffragists
to bring about a decision by the su
preme court before the November elec
tion on the legality of ratification of
the federal suffrage amendment, were
outlined in a statement issued today
by the American Constitutional league
The anti-suifragists, according to
the statement propose first to appeal
pending litigation as to Tennessee's
return to the Tennessee supreme court
which meets September 20. An attempt
will be made to have the case appealed
or certified from the Tennessee court
to the supreme court.
The second method outlined is to
bring injunction and mandamus pro
ceedings against election officials to
keep women from voting and thereby
cause suffragists themselves to help
expedite the case to the highest court
The third proposal is to have an at
torney general of one of the 12 states
which have not ratified, refuse women
the vote and carry the case into the
supreme court at once on an original
jurisdiction in the name of a sovereign
state.
Should these methods fail, anti-suffragists,
according to the league hope
to carry to the supreme court the ap
peal from the district of Columbia su
preme court's dismissal of an injunc
tion to restrain Seci-etary of State
Colby from proclaiming the suffrage
amendment's ratification.
STRIKING TOBACCO
WORKERS RETURN
TO WORK IN MEXICO
MEXICO CITY, Sept. 5 Striking
mill men and tobacco workers in
the federal district of the State of
Mexico have returned to work in
conformity with an agreement made
with the provisional president, who
has promised his efforts to settle
the dispute.
Mexico City newspapers, how
ever, quote strike leaders as say
ing tnat unless an agreement has
been reached before Sept. 10. a
general strike will be called Sent.
11.
GEORGE ENDS LUCERNE VISIT
LUCERNE, Sept. 5. The visit of
Premier Lloyd George to Lucerne end
ed today. Accompanied by his suite
of 24 persons, tho premier left on a
special train for Zermatt, from where
he will continue his journey direct to j
London. The exact date of his home- j
ward journey has not been made pub- j
lie, owing, it is said, to an increase in
the number of threatening letters and
telegrams received by the premier,
which has led to fears that an attack
upon him might be attempted en
route.
The premier himself, it is declared,
is not concerned over these threats.
o
EPISCOPAL CONFERENCE
ST. LOUIS. Sej.t. ". A c:ill for a con
ference of tho house of bishops of the
Episcopal Church of America here Oct.
27 was issued tonight by D.ni 1 S. Tut
tle, presiding bishop. Elections to fiil
several vacancies existing will come
before the meet in?.
GERMANY APOLOGIZES
BERLIN, Sept. " Dr. Walter Simon,
the foreign minister, accompanied by
Urrr Severing of the Prussian minis
try, called sit the French cmb;ify to
day and expressed the provernmen 1 s
apolosy tor the recent incident at Bres
l.iu. during which a mob attacked the
French consulate.
1
m EST
OUTUNE
on
w
HARDING DENIES HE FAVORS
SEPARATE PEACE WITH HUNS
BUT INSISTS THAT PENDING
TREATIES MUST BE AMENDED
r
GENERAL OBREGON
CARRIES JUAREZ
BY BIG MAJORITY
JUAREZ, Mexico, Sept. 5 Gen.
Alvaro Obregon, candidate of the
Liberal constitutionalist party, car
ried Juarez by an overwhelming
majority in the national and state
elections today. It was' estimated
that Robles Dominguez, candidate
of the Republican party, would not
.receive more than ten votes. Gen.
Ignacio Enriquez had no opposition
for governor of Chihuahua. The
constitutionalist party elected their
credit for deputy in the state con
gress. No disorders marked the
election.
HAYS REFUTES COX
CHARGES THAT REP
REPORTS FALSIFIED
Republican A. P. Leased Wire
NEW YORK, Sept. 5. Will H. Hays,
chairma-n of the Republican national
committee, issued a statement today
in reply to Governor Cox'a attack on
truthfulness of his testimony before
the senate committee investigating
campaign contributions. The state
ment said:
'According to public reports Gover
nor Cox yesterday made the following
accusation against me personally:
" T charge that Will H. Hays per
petrated a deliberate falsehood, when
he said under oath that there were no
quotas.'
"In my written statement read to
the senate committee on August 30,
in Chicago, I paid:
" 'Tentative quotas were fixed by
the treasurer's office, all tentative and
rather ' as a goal, alwRys high, of
course, tor the particular state to
drive for and changing constantly.
" 'At different periods different
quotas have been suggested by the
treasurer's office as tentative goals In
different states and the state com
mittees themselves have fixed differ
ent quotas. These, as above suggest
ed, are changing constantly and - al
ways, of course, were made very much
higher than either necessary or antici
pated. The fact is, the quotas meant
little. Furthermore, whatever may
have been suggested by quotas by
overzealous solicitors in their enthusi
asm in different localities, the fact re
mains that a certain amount was be
lieved necessary, and the budget above
referred to was indicated therefor,
which is $3,079,037.20 for the national
committee. u hen this amount was
fixed as the buget, that became the
sum fixed for the treasurer to reach
and the purpose became definite. The
fact at ' all times remains that the
treasurer is driving to collect enough
and no more than enough to meet the
necessary expenses estimated to be
something in excess of three million
dollars.'
' These are the facts. Let the public
judge as to the truth or falsity of
Governor Cox's accusation. It has the
same reckless irresponsibility as his
claimof" $15,000,000. Further comment
on the reliability of his statemcnta is
unnecessary."
o
SENATOR EDGE SAYS
HAYS DID NOT LIE
TO FUND COMMITTEE
Republican A. P. Leased Wire
ATLANTIC CITY, NY J., Sept. 5
United States Senator Edge of
New Jersey, a member of the sen
ate committee ftivest igating cam
paign funds, gave out a transcript
today of the evidence of Will H.
Hays before the senate committee
at Chicago which showed that
Hays admitted the existence of
Republican campaign "quotas,"
Senator Edge said he was amazed
that Governor Cox would assert
that Chairman Hays denied the
existence of campaign "quotas."
o
FOUR ENTER PAKE'S PEAK RACE
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.. Sept.
5. At a meeting oi tne racing men
here ton'ght in the office of Fred Mat-
thef, traffic manager for the Highway
company, word was received of a fourth
entry in the airplane race to the sum
mit of Pike's Peak from Denver. It is
a giant DrHaviland government plane
Spencer Penrose, well known local cap
italist who wagered $1,000 on the race.
probablj will not make the trip himself,
it was learned hero tonignt.
what is it?
the answer!
will appear
watch for it!
You may be
most by knowin
Practical Lcagu? of NAtJona
Not Objectionable to Re
publican Nominee, Wick
ersham Says
Republican A. P. Leased Wire
MARION, O., Sept. 5 After an ex
tended conference today with Senator
Harding, George W'ickersham, a former
Republican attorney general and an
advocate of the league of nations, is
sued, a statement declaring the Re
publican nominee would not "wholly
and finally reject the league" but
would take the lead in revising the
covenant and putting it into practical
operation.
The senator recognizes, Mr. Wicker
sham added, that the league is so in
terwoven with the fortunes of Europe
that its unobjectionable featurea must
be preserved to stabilise European
peace.
From Senator Harding himself there
was no expression on the subject but
it was indicated that in the near fu
ture he might make a public statement
detailing bis precise stand with regard
to acceptance of any portion of the
covenant as it was written.
"When President Harding, working
in accord with a Republican congress,
takes up the work of placing upon a
firm. Just and sure founda-tfon, the
relation of this country to the other
nations of the world, I am confident
that the logic of accomplished fact will
lead to the adoption of the league, so
modified as to remove all Just doubts
aa to its undue effect on American
rights and interests," aid Mr. Wicker-
sham statement.
"Senator Hardiiig has recognized
this fatt in tbe statement that he has
no expectation whatever of finding it
necessary or advisable to negotiate a
separate peace with Germany. The
first effort of his administration ob-
vlously must be to secure an .agree
ment with the parties to the treat.'es
of Versailles for its modification so as
to remove the objections of the Amer
ican government and that accom
plished, oar acceptance of the amended
treaty will be the natural solution of,
the international problem.
U. S. May Lead In Revision
"No one wH dispute Senator Hard
ing's insistence that the United State.s
may take tbe lead in revision, amend
ment, or reconstruction and be able to
count on the cordial co-opcratlon of all
nations concerned."
Senator Harding also refrained from
discussing the categorical questions
about the league wh.'ch were addressed
to him by Governor Cox last night in
his Milwaukee speech. The Republi
can nominee said he proposed to main
tain his policy of not engaging in a
debate with his opponent and would
express his views in his own way as
occasion offered.
Another caller today was Oscar Du-
rant, editor of LTtalia, a Chicago Ital
ian daily newspaper. He talked with
the senator about the Fiume question
and aid afterward he was satisfied
that Mr. Harding would "accord to
Italian interests the fair and fr.endly
treatment that has been denied under
Wilson."
Tomorrow Senator Harding will de
liver a Labor day address her and on
Tuesday he will leave for Minnesota to
make his first speech outside Ohio
since his nomination. Plans provide
for a call at Chicago on Major General
Leonard Wood.
It was said tonight at headquarters
that the senator had no intention of
making any speeches en route.
a
BE CALLED TUESDAY
Republican A. P. Leased Wire
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Sept, 5 Ala
bama coal operators today signified
their intention of accepting Governor
Kilby's suggestion to submit the ques
tions at issue between the operators
and miners to the commission of three
named by the governor last night. The
operators made the proviso that they
be n6t required to deal with the Vnilnl
Mine Workers' organization or its of
ficers. J. R. Kennamer, president of the
Alabama district of the United Mine
workers, has replied to Governor Kil
by's plea that the strike be held up
with the statement while the miners
arc willing for the investigation to be
made by the governor's committee,
nothing would be gained by delaying
the strike in view of the attitude of the
operators in refusing to recognize the
union.
The strike has been ordered for
Tuesday.
MI ST1ET0
that can't move, yet visits more places in
a day than a man could visit in a year?
that can't talk, yet speaks to thousands
of people every day?
in tomorrow's Republican.
just
the one who will profit
rr

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