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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, October 19, 1920, Section Two, Image 9

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ONA REPUBLICAN
AM
AN INDEPENDENT PROGRESSIVE JOURNAL
THIRTY-FIRST YEAR
(Section Two)
PHOENIX, ARIZONA, TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 19, 1920.
(Section Two)
VOL. XXXL, NO. 175
TWK
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Jj INCHES FljOM.
mGowm-PLAWRUii
y fi? Lillian Paschal Da?
ADVENTURE-S
OR THE- TWINS
V Ojiy, RoWt Barton,
ANONYMOUS LETTER WRITERS
Rometlmes I Krt anonymous letters.
Sm as every cn else. I Hup pone.
Their writer" are of a low order.
Thy remind me of garter anukes.
I'oor little harmless reptile!
They think they arc poisonous.
They're not have no venom.
Cowards, afraid of a grans-blade.
No one takes them seriously.
Itealrte them, a rattler's a gentleman.
II fights in the open.
And he warns of ntrlkinjt.
(Jarter snafees are yellow-streaker.
So are anonymous letter-writers.
Garter SNAKKS, I call them.
Afraid to alifn their names.
Crawlers ami hilers In mud!
Kut the sneak (an bo hired.
They're paid a dollar a letter.
Favorite trick of low politicians.
His business Is trapplnu them.
Ask any U. S. Fee-ret Fervlce nirent.
I've trapped a few myself.
One of them was a woman.
They often are, I'm sorry to say.
They're so clumsy about It. too.
A sinuous trull is always left.
Rm as their reptilian prototype.
This one used a special envelope.
Tracing- It ai child's play.
Grapeluts
or
breakfast
A dish of this
delicious wheat
and malted bar
ley food starts
the day right.
A Sugar Saver
Postal authorities would prosecute.
Hut I didn't hand her over.
I Invited her to my country bouse.
It used to be heated with hot air.
A hot water system has been put in.
P.ut the old registers remain.
One is ii the guest room ceiling.
The bed was pushed over.
It was rlKht under the register.
We waited until she was asleep.
Then we poured Mud down,
We had kettles full of It.
She screeched blue murder.
We ru&hed to her door.
She was a ridiculous sisrht.
Plastered black from head to foot!
We laughed ourselves hoarse.
She demanded explanations.
We showed her her own letter,
Also the proof of its tracing.
'This is what YOU do." I told her.
"Mud-throwing in the dark!
Catching people off guard!
Mow do TOU like it?
Remember the Golden Rule!"
She talked of calling the police.
"Do!" I showed her a warrant.
It was for her own arrest.
She hung bvr shamed head.
"Get your clothes and go!'
She went well-cured.
There's one "garter sneak" less.
Isn't it odd?
Mud-throwers throw it at others.
They hate it thrown on themselves
O '
MODERN ISLANDS OF TREASURE
Situated in the Pacific Ocean, nearly
midway between America and Asia, is
Nauru, a barren bit of rock only twelve
miles in circumference.
Thirty or forty years ago almost any
body could have had it for the asking.
Today it is worth untold millions, ow
Ing to the belated discovery that the
whole islaml is neither more or less
than a mass of phosfrhate rock, the
most wonderful soil fertilizer known
to agriculturists.
In Conception Bay, Newfoundland, la
ell Island, sold by its original owner
itiany years ago for $100. Soon after
wards it changed hands again, for 2
million dollars. "
This enormous rise in value was due
to the accidental discovery that the
island is composed almost entirely of
Iron ore.
For years previously shipmasters had
been n the habit of taking the heavy,
A STRANGE DISEASE
"Ves," said Dr. Mink, looking down at Markie Muskrat'o chair with a queer
look on his face, "it's a verv stranee disease this chap has, Mr. Scribble
Scratch, a very strange one, indeed! It's called 'stuckankanio van inch.' The
person who baa it can't move at all!"
. "You don't say no," exclaimed the fairyman schoolmaster. "I never heard
of it before, did you. Nancy?"
Nancy hadn't, neither had Judge Crow nor Trof. Hare nor Mr. Chuck nor
anybody.
"It is kind of paralysis?" asked Scribble Scratch anxiously, feeling sorry
that he had ever scolded Markie for anything.
"Sort of," nodded Dr. Mink, "only it doesn't last so long, and the only way
to cure it is very difficult to learn. Very few people know how."
"Oh," cried Nancy very much worried, "don't you know. Dr. Mink? Won't
poor Markie ever be well arfain?"
V lgB3a
f 1
TOWLE'S
LQG'CABM-
SYRUP
rm
PUT the good old Log
Cabin in the centre of the
tabic three times aday. You'll
find it the centre of interest.
Everybody looks for the
famous Log Cabin once they
taste this delicious flavor of
pure maple.
Whatever the dish cereal, grape
fruit, French toast, fried mush,
hot biscuits, dessert or just plain
bread Log Cabin Syrup adds
the touch of deliciousness and
luxury that everybody loves.
No home should be without the
little Log Cabin. See that you
have it in your home.
Three Sizes
At Your Grocers
loraessiQiisoiaro
(Copyigfit by lfexarrrtcrpriAs?(xiai
0
"You don't say so," exclaimed the fairyman schoolmaster. "I never heard
of it before."
Dr. Mink looked very learned. "Fortunately, I do know. The secret of
curing. this strange disease' was told me by my great-grandfather's niece'a
cousin's sister-in-law's brother."
-Fine!" cried everybody at Dr. Mink's words, and even the other pupils In
Meadow Grove were so interested that they quite forgot to sit in position, and
Scamper Squirrel fell off his seat altogether.
"Hut I must have help," went on Dr. Mink, "or rather obedience. Will
everyone agree to do exactly as I tell him?'' And he looked at each one of
them over his glasses.
Markie was getting very uncomfortable, not so much because the chewing
gum he was sitting on was pulling every hair out of him, nearly, but because
he felt guilty. lie sort of felt that he needed a good trouncing and it would
be a lot better if someone would just give it to him and have It over with.
easily handled rock for ballast, dump
ing it overboard with the unmost un
concern when they loaded up with
cargo.
Then, one day, a captain, more cur
ious than the others, had the strange
looking "rock" assayed, and his fortune
was made.
Not very far away, in the Gulf of St.
Iawrence, is Anticostl Islandr bought
In 1893 from the dominion government
by M. Henry Menier.' the French "choc
olate King." for :5,000 125,O00). At
the time. he was laughed at.
But it proved a good Investment for
him. nevertheless, for the thick brush
wood with which the grwiter part of
the Island was covered proved to be
swarming with black and sliver foxes,
the most valuable fur bearing animals
In the world. (Answers, London.)
o
STANDARD HIGH SCHOOL DRESS
To avoid the heartaches that some
times come from a knowledge that their
clothing is not as fine as other girls'.
young women attending the high
schools of Philadelphia have adopted a
Uniform and inexpenisvo style of dress.
Miss Mae Taintor of the Germantown
high school, speaking at a meeting of
the Young Women's Christian Associa
tion, made that announcement. A sim
ple serge frock, she said, has been se
lected for winter and a middy blouse
and skirt for spring and summer styles
in the high schools. (Philadelphia
Public Ledger.)
o
FALL SILHOUETTE
The majority of the fall suits have
long coats, reaching below the knee,
nd fit to follow the lines of the fig-
re. The waistline is low, and the
skirts lack fulness and are very short. Jane
V
Beauty Culture
Shampooing with dis
tilled water, 75c.
JEFFERSON HAIR
STORE
Hotel Bldg.
Phone 4139
Oh that morning grouch!
But give him a cup of
real good coffee and see
how quickly it goes I
Give him Schilling Cof-
'fee and tell him that it costs
no more per cup than or
dinary coffeco Tell him
that you can get your mo
ney back, from your grocer
any time you wani it,
Sec hw quickly it gocsl
Schilling Coffee
Deb Can't Help But-Brood Over Her
Relations With Jim
Deborah Burns came every day to
ask for the news from Jim's sick room.
Fortunately, I could always report that
Jim's improvement was steady, if slow.
Jim would be home soon with his
nurses. His convalescence probably
would be long. I think the idea that
Jim would be an invalid for a month
or more was very hard for Deborah to
accept
The love for a man of a grand girl
like Deb is decidedly maternal. I could
see that she was simply wild to take
ca 5 of Jim herself. I suppose her war
work had made her critical of nurs-
ine as well as very competent in it.
Half Jokingly, one day. I assured her
that I would gladly recommend her to
Ann if she applied for a place! Deb
blushed violently, and because self-
consciousness is so rare with her,
felt that she would have undertaken
thb romantic role had it been feasible.
Certainlj'v she had considered it, not
for love'sake, not to be near Jim, but
to be assured that every detail of his
care was quite perfect.
Little good was Mistress Ann in
overseeing anything. Deb knew that
as well as I, although we never dis
cussed the point.
Deb's daily call brought us to the
stage of friendship wnlch sentimental
school girls describe as intimate. Neith
er of us any longer tried to cenceal our
emotional distresses from the other.
Deb excused her own frankness about
her feelings In this -way.
You're so understanding, Jane.
SVhen I was alone, my thoughts center
on the time I spent wun mm in tne
hospital. You will not be shocked
when I tell you. Anybody else would.
I I'm simply distracted. "When Ire
member that he called for me. that
when he was delirious he wanted me
me of all the women he might have
called Ann Chrys his mother you
my heart almost breaks."
"I thought you were going to be so
brave, dear!"
"So did I. But how could I know
I would miss him so? That It would
hurt so?"
"Don't brood about it. Deb." I said,
hating myself as a false comforter.
'Brooding is absurd, I know. It's
been pretending for days I've tried to
I pose, I admit, when I try to
overcome my emotions. Pose In love
always fails, I guess."
"One loves or one does not love.
And if you pretend what you do not
feel, cither way, you have to pay. I
ought to know," I said bitterly. 'I've
nwn. Deb dear, I've pretended to be
fool myself into believing that I don't
care about my quarrel with Bob that
I desire his happiness more than my
own. Deb, dear, I've pretended to be
awfully superior to the common ex
perience of woman and "I've discov
ered, as you have, that in love one
cannot fool oneself by pretending."
Deb looked at me thoughtfully, but
I could see that she wasn't considering
my problem at all. Finally she 6poke:
"You know why I went to the hos
pital. He wanted me. He asked for
me."
"You were awfully good to go, dear,
considering what th I gossips might
have said."
"Now he is recovering. He will never
be disloyal to his wife, even by the
meaning of a single smile.'
"Not if I know Jimmy-boy, I said.
"If I wanted to take him away from
her, I could do it!"
I looked at Deb in vast astonishment!
(To be continued)
' o
AT THE NOTION COUNTER
Clerk: "Do you want a narrow man's
comb?"
Girl: "No, I want a comb for a stout
man w ith rubber teeth." Printers' Ink.
THE TOUNG LADT ACROSS THE WAY
Cm, lKWKWnm m.nmn ill i !
Dhl Monte Catsup
sharpens dull appetites. It
is the one relish that always
pleases because of its dis
tinctive piquant flavor of
rad-rlpe tomatoes that
blends with and improves
almost every other food.
A bottle on the table will
help you enjoy your meals
better.
THE YOUNO LADY ACROSS TH
WAY,
The yevng lady aeroaa tB way.
she never could understand bow rolV
Ing stones could Cock .together, -any
L" ' (o)
li S II p :is Ifl i ial fepS i
ft i H H m m mmmm B
NOTICE
Regarding Mr. Hoffman' aervVca.
Up to the time of his recent connect
tion with theTroco Company, Mr. ,
Hoffman's advice tod counsel was
greatly in demand by Agricultuial
Colleges, Dairy Schools and Aaao
ciationa. Educational Organization,
Women's Clubs, etc Wo wih hhn
to continue thi4d work nd his
ervices will atill be available for this
purpoae, with the hearty co-opera
tion of this company.
How Butter Making
- Taught Me to Perfect Troco
By A. EL Hoffman (for 30 years a butter expert)
This is how I make Troco
I have spent 30 years learning how to make Troco.
Every year devoted to making Butter, judging butter and
teaching butter making, better qualified me to perfect
this equally delicate product.
For as most users know.Troco is made from pure coco
nut fat and milk. The process is essentially the same as
butter making.
Perfection of flavor depends upon care scrupu
lous, exacting care, from the selection of ingredients
throughout every process.
Some people may say that if this is all, anyone can do
it. And anyone can. But the definition of genius is jhe
capacity for taking pains.
TheTroco Company has given me a new plant a plant
of white tile and concrete in which to carry out my ideas.
It is provided with an elaborate laboratory. The starter
room is sealed against cpstaminating flavors and odors.
TROCO NUT BUTTER
Wholesale Grocers
I test every ounce of coconut fat and every quart of mflk
we use. This nut fat must be fresh and absolutely neutral
All milk comes from herds of which we have personal
knowledge. It is twice pasteurized.
The lactic acid culture which flavors butter and Troco
is made with exacting care in our sealed starter-room.
Then this tested nut fat is churned with the double pas- .
teurized milk which has been properly flavored with the
lactic culture.
After churning it is crystallized in filtered ice water,
worked and salted just like butter and made into prints.
If it is handled with as much care as it is made, Troco
will reach your table as sweet and fresh as any such
product could possibly be. '
COMPANY, CHICAGO
THE MELCZER CO. .
Cor. Fourth Ave. and Jackson
Phone 4381
WHO
y . , use.
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