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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, May 06, 1921, Image 7

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1921-05-06/ed-1/seq-7/

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THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN. FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 6, 1921
PAGE SEVJCiN
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M El
A ill FOR
GALL FOR BIDS
FOR PAVING OF
GRAND AVENUE
The Clouds
of Doubt and Uncertainty
Have Rolled by
WE ARE emerging finom the Shadow and entering, the
Sunshine of PROSPERITY. We are standing upon the
threshold of a New Day. Out of imaginary chaos and temporary
depression come OPTIMISM and CONFIDENCE in the Future.
Speculative orgies are rapidly being replaced by Sound Construc
tive Business Policies. Fictitious Values and High Prices have
had their fling and now step aside to make way for REAL
VALUES based upon present Replacement Costs.
THIS is a Prosperous Condition and we are proud that our 312
DEPARTMENT STORES were among the VERY FIRST
TO LOWER PRICES and thus help to bring about this new
PROSPERITY that promises to be SOUND and ENDURING.
Our Ready-to-Wear department offers great opportunities for
the woman who wants to save; watch our windows for the new
things. .
10,000 Dresses Purchased at One Time
J. C. Penney Company makes gigantic purchases of dresses and
distributes among our 312 stores. You can readily realize the
tremendous advantage and savings Ifor the buying public.
BEAUTIFUL NEW ORGANDIE DRESSES
A very desirable lot of dresses just arrived. Beautifully trimmed
with ruffles and hand embroidered designs. Some dotted Swiss
dresses, $5.90, $10.90, $12.50.
WHITE VOILE WAISTS 98c, $1.49, $1.98, to $3.98.
A large assortment of dainty waists trimmed in lace, embroidery
and stitchings, unusual values at our regular prices, 98c, $1.49,
$1.98 to $3.98.
GEORGETTE WAISTS $2.98, $3.98 TO $9.90. ,
A beautiful range of pastel shades.
GABARDINE WASH SKIRTS 98c, $1.98 TO $3.98.
Here is an exceptional chance to save on desirable white summer
, skirts.'
WHITE SERGE SKIRTS $3.49 TO $14.75.
GINGHAM STREET DRESSES $3.98 TO $7.90.
You'U be surprised at the handsome gingham dresses we are
showing at these low prices.
VOILE AND ORGANDIE DRESSES $4.98 TO $9.90.
A wide range of pretty patterns and colors, trimmed in late and
charming models.
GRADE A JAP CREPE, PER YARD, 35c.
This is the very grade obtainable, dyed in the yarn; Japanese
Crepe in a good assortment of colors.
A. F. C DRESS GINGHAMS 19c.
A beautiful range of patterns in fast colors, 27 and 32 inches
wide. '
RENFREW DEVONSHIRE CLOTH, PER YARD, 39c.
A very desirable cloth for. children's clothes, wide range of colors
and patterns.
VOILES 29c, 39c, 49c AND 58c
A wide range of the wanted patterns and shades.
CREPE MOHAIR, PER YARD $1.49
Genuine Mohair cloth in sport stripes for skirts and sport clothes.
WOMEN'S PURE THREAD SILK HOSE 98c
Re-inf orced heel and toe ; Brown, Black and White.
WOMEN'S FIBRE SILK HOSE 49c
An exceptional value, Brown and White. . .
MEN'S ATHLETIC UNION SUITS 98c AND $1.25
J. C. Penney Brand, extra strong material and seams ; knit
waist band, closed crotch.
BOYS' ATHLETIC UNION SUITS 69c AND 79c
CHAMBRAY WORK SHIRTS, 83c AND 63c
Strong material, full sizes. Big Yank, Uncle Sam, Pay Day and
other brands, blue and gray.
MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS, 98c
A wide assortment of stripes, with or without collar attached.
This Is the Family Shoe Store
WOMEN'S WHITE CANVAS OXFORDS AND PUMPS
$1.98, $2.49 AND $2.98.
Women's black and brown oxfords and pumps, S2.98, $3.50,
$4.98, $6,90, $8.90.
Men's white canvas oxfords, $4.49.
Men's Brown and Black dress shoes, $3.98, $4.25 and up to $9.90.
TAKE A PEEP IN OUR WINDOWS EVERY DAY, IT WILL
MEAN THE SAVING OF MANY A DOLLAR FOR YOU.
- if ' T?
! ft BUYING ,
. ; IJ MOST :
I ill BUI ffTf I !
mi 1 V. A sti i ii tncorixrmm
W 07 312 DEPARTMENT STORES
300 W. Washington St.
THE LARGEST CHAIN DEPARTMENT
STORE ORGANIZATION IN THE WORLD '
PROMINENT KANSAS
CITY BANKER
LOCAL H
JONS
TTTION
Improvement Of The High
way irom Phoenix lo
Glendale Expected To Be
Completed Before Com
ing Autumn
Pavinjr of Grand avenue will be
nder way in another three weeks.
The state highway department yes
terday issued a call for bids for the
paving of the avenue from Phoenix
to Glendale, to be opfiied Slay 23. It
is expected that construction work
ill be begun shortly after that date
nd that the paving of the highway
ill be completed uurine the late
summer or earlv autumn.
The financing o Ihis project W'as
made possible at this time by the
passage of the omnibus bill, the co-
peration of the Maricopa county
highway commissoin and the state
ighway department and federal aid.
The omnibus bill, as originally intro
duced, carried an appropriation of
Ilnnflfin frr mnrAvihr th. rnan frrnn
Buckeye toward Yuma, to the county
line. Through the efforts of Senator
Wilkinson the act was amended to
permit the temporary use of this
money in Improving the Glendale
road provided it could be repaid be
fore Oct. 1, 1921, either from proceeds
of the 4,500.000 bond issue or from
federal aid received on account or
any other road in the Maricopa coun
ty program.
Federal Aid Project
The former proposition was out of
the question as it would not be pos
sible to sell the $4,500,000 bond issue
prior to Oct. 1, so negotiations were
started beween the state highway de
partment and the Maricopa county
highway commission looking to the
early construction oi! this important
project, since liraiid avenue irom
Phoenix to Glendale was not included
in the first bond issue of $4,000,000,
the highway comnission could not
use any part of tha.t money but would
have to wait until tins second bond is
sue of S4.5O0.OO0 had been sold, which
would delay construction until next
winter. The result Is an arrangement
whereby the Buck-ye road and Gfand
avenue are both made federal aid
projects.
The highway commission will at
once pave the Buckeye road from
Phoenix to the Agua Fria river. The
state highway department will pave
Grand avenue from Phoenix to Glen
dale, using the 11.00,000 provided for
In the omnibus bill and federal aid
the $100,000 to be repaid from federal
aid received on the Buckeye road
Through this arrangement work can
be started as soon as a contract can
be let and one of the most impor
tant pieces of highway work In the
county will be disposed of.
The paving of Grand avenue Is of
Interest not only as a local proposi
tion between Glendale and Phoenix.
but to all the northwestern part of
the state. It Is on the route between
Phoenix and Wickenburg over which
r-asses traffic en- route to Prescott.
Kingman, northern Arizona, Parker,
Los Angeles and m uy other-points. '
Hop for Apach Trail
It is expected that congress will. In
the near future, appropriate addi
tional money for federal aid. In which
event an additional $230,000 secured
as federal aid en other portions of
the Maricopa county program will be
used to Improve the 'Apache trail in
connection with the appropriation of
$ iS.OOO in the omnibus bill. In this
manner the Apache trail will be re
stored without cost to Maricopa
county.
The highway department has been
trying for nearly two years to fi
nance the pavinij of the road between
Ehoenix and Glendale.. Several prev
ious attempts in this direction have
failed and the consummation of this
road building was only secured when
all the interested road officials were
induced to co-operate.
o .
Of unusual interest in financial cir
cles was the announcement yesterday
that John M. Moore, president of the
Fidelity National Bank and Trust Co.
of Kansas City, has acquired a sub
stantial interest in the Commercial
National bank in this city. Mr.
Moore has been actively identified
with many successful financial in
stitutions and is one of the well
known bankers of the country.
Coincident with the announcement,
the board of directors at its regular
meeting yesterday elected John ft.
Hampton chairman of the board of
directors, and F. D. Trekell, capitalist
arm iana owner oi i noenix ana i
Angeles, president of the institution.
Mr. Trekell is well known in Arizo
na, as he has had large interests here
for many years. He is interested in
several banks and is recognized as
an unusually successful business man.
Hugh, B. Cassidy. who has been
cashier at the commercial National
bank since its opening, was continued
by the board in that position, and was
also elected vice pisldent at the
meeting yesterday.
Mr. Trekell said he has absolute
confidence in the Salt River valley.
and that while times have been some
what hard, he looks for local condi
tions to improve rapidly. He was
well satisfied with the affairs of the
Commercial National bank, and said
he was surprised at the remarkable
showing made. In support of his
statement he called attention to the
condensed statement of the condi
tion of the bank at the close of busi
ness yesterday.
. o
COLORED
STUDENTS
TO PRESENT PLAY
"At the End of the Rainbow- will
be presented at t o'clock tonight at
the high school auditorium by the
colored students of the high school.
The play is a three act comedy with
a cast of 25, including practically all
the colored pupils. The plot re
volves about an attempt to steal
some important papers, and the locale
is a college town, many of the char
acters being college students.
In this store we feature
Strafford Clothes
because we haven't been able to
find another make that so thoroughly
satisfies the demands of the best
dressed young men in this city.
All the essentials of good clothes are
embodied in this famous make
style, originality, quality and right
prices.
We want especially to call your at
tention to the prices which are con
siderably loweY than they were a few
months ago.'
HQS
icaac le .
ffiratford QUit
18-20 West Washington St.
SHE EA1S MONEY TO
GET OUT YEAR BOOK
When Mrs. Henry D. Ross, state
president of the Arizona Federation
of Musical clubs, discovered that
there was not sufficient funds in the
treasury to cover the publication of
a year book, she determined to raise
the amount necessary. In view of the
fact that the members had' been
"taxed to their eyebrows," this year
Mrs. Ross decided to go out and earn
the money and at the same time give
the people value received, and then
some.
The wife of the chife Justice of
the supreme court went about in a
business like way and talked adver
tising to every important musical
firm in the city, to tne best teach
ers of music tere and elsewhere and,
as a result, she not only will get
out one of the most comprehensive
year books, but will have "left over
funds for the treasury.
The year book will be sent to ev
ery musical club in the state and
the music section of every club af
filiated with the statu federation. In
addition to this wide circulation, Mrs.
Ross will take 75 copies back to the
biennial convention which will meet
in the Tri-Cities. Davenport, Moline
and Rock Island, on June t, which
will be attended by 5,000 women from
all over the country.
SELLING JL
MOST y
WE T
SELL n
FOR U
LESS L
GRADE
GIRL
L
RESERVES TO MEET
Grade school Girl Reserves will
hold a rally tomorrow afternoon at
the Roosevelt school, the ten differ
ent corps uniting for the last meet
ing of the season. It is expected that
125 reserves will be present at the
gathering, which will be featured by
a program followed by outdoor
stunts and base ball. In the eve
ning a picnic supper will be served
on the grounds of the Roosevelt
Neighborhood club house.
The reserves will leave the T. W.
A. at 1:30 o'clock and will be
transoorted south of town In trucks.
Joe V. Proohaska, state game war
den, will be the principal speaker,
giving a talk on "Birds." Miss Mary
Ijee, girls' work secretary of the
"T," will discuss the work of the
organization, and there will be songs
and stunts by the reserves. There
will be two baseball games. Roose
velt plajing Momoe nd Kenilwotth
the Adams Reserve
Goodrich Price Readjustment
Endorsed by Users and Dealers
Throughout the Country
The decisive reduction of twenty per cent in the prices
of Goodrich Silvertown Cords, Goodrich Fabrics and
Goodrich Inner Tubes which took effect Monday, May 2,
received the endorsement of both tire users and dealers.
It was accepted at its full face value as a helpful eco
nomic move in tune with the times.
It conforms to present conditions and carries out in a
straightforward way constructive merchandising meth
ods. Goodrich Tires have earned their reputation a n d
standing with motorists by sheer quality of construction
and complete dependability of service.
Quality in a tire rests not only upon the materials of
which it is made, but also upon the experience and skill
of its makers.
Every advance in construction and improvement in
making, with many exclusive betterments is in the Good
rich Tires you buy today.
Your Goodrich dealer is ready to supply your needs.
B. F. GOODRICH RUBBER COMPANY
AKRON, OHIO
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