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Arizona republican. (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, November 05, 1921, Image 9

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THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, PHOENIX, SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 5, 1921
PAGE NINE
SOUTHSIDE NEWS
OFFICE SOUTHSIDE DEPT.
15 S. Macdonald St Ph. 341, Mesa
TEMPE AGENCY
ird & Dines Drug Store
Phene 22
GILBERT AGENCY
Gilbert Pharmacy
Phone Mm 1R2
MKJ.V Nov. 4 Addresses by
r:pht P. Heard. H. C. Heard,
Charles M. Morgan and Mrs. But
ter orth will feature a special meet
ir.s of the cotton growers to be held
Saturday nisht In the Commercial
Sub rooms under the auspices of the
Mesa, Farm bureau. The feasability
-t char. line the present type of cet
t grown In the valley will be the
principal matter discussed at the
local farmers have experimented
with fiber tj-pes of cotton such as
the delta. Durango and short staple,
and some are favorably impressed
i!h the possibility of growing a new
type here.
" It would take at least two years
tn mike thechange successfully ," one
grower said Friday, and whatever
. , .ruo?' hiriVt'-S
.wiidered first. It was believed
tn'wers and open discuss n of the
matter would throw more light on
the subject. . '
The subject Is one of great Im
portance to all growers, an official
cf the Mesa farm bureau said Fri
day, and all should make an effort
to pet out to the meeting. It will be
held in the Commercial club rooms,
starting at 7:30.
Stores to Close Armistice Day
Proprietors of the Mesa grocery
stores announced Friday that their
:ores will be closed all of Armistice
day. Nov. 11. and it is probable that
i;her business houses will follow
suit. A proclamation issued by
Mayor Dan Klienman has called for
an all day observance of Armistice
day as a holiday and the announce
ment of the grocery stores it was
t fraught Friday would be followed
w::h a general cessation of all busi
ness in the city.
Open Legion Headquarters
Headquarters, of the Mesa post of
the American Legion have been es
tablished in the Mesa Savings Bank
and Trust company and C R. Jones
will he on duty there as executive
secretary each day until after the
legion's Armistice day . program is
concluded. An attractive display of
war relics and curios has been ar
ranged and a vigorous campaign for
new members to the Mesa post will
fc conducted during the next week.
Combination tickets entitling new
members to admission to all events
on Armistice day and to membership
In the Mesa post for the remainder
cf this year are being sold.
Plans for the Armistice day pro
gram are going steadily forward. A
patriotic service in the forenoon will
be held in the high school. The In
dian school band has been secured
f-r the afternoon and evening and
will lead .the parade which is to pre
cede the football game in the after
noon. In the evening a luncheon and
reunion for all legionnaires and their
ladies will be held and the night will
he given over to a grand legion ball
, in the L. D. S. auditorium.
Scout Convention Is Big
Alma M. Davis, secretary of the
Apache council of the Boy Scouts,
returned Friday morning from Long
Reach, where he attended on Tues
day and Wednesday the regional con
ference of the twelfth district. More
than a hundred delegates represent
ing the states of California, Utah,
Arizona, Nevada and the Hawaiian
IsJunria attended the conference,
instructive organization work of
the Boy Scouts was taken up, ac
mrdine to Mr. Davis, and the scout
ing movement was shown to have
accomplished greater progresss in
the year 1920 than it did in the 10
vears previous. It is apparent that
Lniitinir is a universal American
tnAl'mpfl t. Mr. Davis added, and the
constructive work put under way at
the conference will do much to fur
ther scouting this year and in the
future. . v
Interesting Talks at Club
A program of unusual interest was
given at. the regular meeting of the
Woman's club of Mesa held Friday'
afternoon in the Guild hall. Some 75
members and guests attended the
meeting. Prof. L. F. Brady of the
Fvans school discussed the disarm
ament question, recounting it from
the English standpoint. Dean Jamie-
rPasseneer AT Fre'iflhti"4
Service from New. York.
New Totk. Boston. Philadelphia,
Baltimore. Montreal. Portland. Ma
AND
IJverpooL Southampton, London
jerry, Cherbourg. Antwerp. London,
Glasgow, Havre, Rotterdam. Mediter.
ranean, Plymouth, Bristol.. Danzig,
Jvant, Hamburg.
For rates of passenger sailings or
jreneral information, apply to
VV. WARD DAVIES
General Ticket Agent for Arizona
443 West Washington Street
Phoenix. Arizona,
. W.
conor, GROWERS
OF MESA SECTION
TO MEET TONIGHT
Ko V AlAffasseneeT A: Frelflht5f if j7
w
Stocks, Bonds, Grain, Cotton, Investments
Logan & Bryan Private Wire Service
We specialize in Liberty Loan Issues
No. 39 South Central Ave., Commercial Hotel BHg.
AUTO STAGE
AUTO STAGES To Globe. Miami. Roosevelt Dam, over the Apache Trail
Daily To Superior, Florence. Ray. Sonora. Tuesday. Thursday. Saturday,
leaving Ray for Phoenix, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. To Tempe, Mesa,
hourly To Chandler every other hour. To Fowler. Tolleson. Cashion. Cold.
... Avondale. Wagner, Litchfield. Liberty, Buckeye, Arlington and Gilles.
Pie
r..m For IUriner imuiumtiuu
lEPOT. 11-13-15 East Jefferson Street.
CHANDLER AGENCY
Gardnar & Harmer Drug Store
Phone 21
GOODYEAR AGENCY
J. E. Flanagan Refreshment
Parlor
son of the University of Arizona
spoke on the subject 'Why Girls are
So'' and Mrs. H. A. Guild, secretary
of the state child welfare board,
spoke. Pleasing musical numbers
were rendered by Mrs. Fordham and
Miss MacDonald.
Hear Talk On Cancer
Members of the Lehi farm bureau
heard an interesting paper on "Can
cer" at the regular meeting of the
bureau held Thursday nisht in the
Lehi school house. Dr. J. E. Jrane of
Mesa addressed the meeting on Uie
treatment and cure of cancer, read
ing a paper by an eminent physician
on the subject. Plans for the coming
district fair in Lehi were also dis
cussed at the meeting.
Church Has Picnic
Members of the Sunday school of
the Mesa Christian church were en
tertained at a picnic by the Tempe
Christian church Sunday school Fri
day night on the desert north of
Tempe.
Maize Thieves Arrested
Two Mexicans charged with the
theft . of milo maize from the Oscar
Ray ranch east of town stood trial
in the local justice of the peace court
Friday morning and were sentenced
to 30 days In jail each or $30 fine.
Suspicious that thieves were work
ing in his patch, Ray called Constable
Pickens out Friday night and after
lyinS in wait several hours for the
,rif,a, wo1.tt
tected as they emerged from the
field with nine sacks of head maize
In tow. . ,
Girl In Family '
Mr. and Mrs. Hyrum Jogenson are
rejoicing over the arrival of a baby
girl born to them Friday morning.
The new members Is the first girl in
the family of five children. ,
Here From U. of A.
Ellsworth and Miss Valorie Men
hennett arrived in Mesa Friday from
Tucson where they are attending the
university to spend the week-end
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wil
liam Menhennett. ,
Entertain at Cards
Six tables will be entertained at
bridge Saturday afternoon at the
home of Mrs. Frank Griffin, on East
First avenue. The affair ia the sec
ond of the series of parties being
given by Mrs. Griffin and Mrs. J. M.
Greer.
Southsida Theaters Today
Majestic, Mesa "The Sage Hen"
starring Gladys Brockwell, comedy
"Dandy Lions."
Gilbert Jack London's "Sea "Wolf"
I all star cast, Mutt and Jeff cartoon.
Tempe Brandon Stock - company
presents "At 9:45."
Chandler Elsie Ferguson in "Lady
Rose's Daughter," Pathe News, west
ern drama "The Sheriff of Mojave."
o . ' .
LAND AT GILBERT
GILBERT, Nov. 4. C. H. Russell,
realtor, of Gilbert, states that busi
ness in this vicinity is picking up
rapidly. He has had several parties
out looking lor land and says that
some few will buy and others will
rent. The cotton yield is reported a
great deal better, a3 an average, than
it has been for some time since.
The ladies' aid met Thursday with
Mrs. Minner. New officers have
been elected, with Mrs. Eddy as presi
dent. Mrs. II: E. Russell returned from
the Mesa hospital on Friday.
Mrs. J. -Jackson of Prescott is
spending a few days with her brother,
C.H. Russell.
Pershing Darphin has been 111 for
the past tew days.
Mrs. Hazel Williams and daughter,
Mrs. C .E. Barnes,-and Mrs. J. Jack
son spent Thursday with Mrs. Grover
Neil of Chandler. .
PAST CHIEFS OF
TEMPE. Nov. 4. The past chiefs
of the Pythian Sisters lodge met at
the home of Mrs. C. G. Steele inurs
dav afternoon and formed an organi
zation which will be called the Past
Chiefs circle of Butte temple. Mrs.
B. B. Mouer was elected chairman
ana jvirs. 1. r raniveuuuig, Bcuciotj.
The circle will meet once a month.
Leaves to Accept School
Mrs. LeMoyne Stroud left Friddy
night for Cedar Glade, Ariz., where
she has accepted a school tor tne en
suing term. She was accompanied by
her little son Elbert, who will attend
school there.
Baptist Church
A snecial service will be held Sun
day, preceding Armistice week. The
program:
Prelude.
Invocation.
Hymn "Oh, Worship the King, All
Glorious."
Responsive reading 46 Psalm (Fol
lowed by Gloria.)
ScriDture reading "Oh God, Our
Help in Ages Past."
Pa storal prayer.
Offertory. Notices.
Sermon "The Vision of a Warless
World."
Hymn.
Services will be held in the church
Lawhon
TIME TABLE
.j vj 1 1 ui ul aiu. w i , i w i o i v t-
INTEREST IN FARM
LODGE ORGANIZE
everv night next week. A complete
program for the week will be given
in Sunday morning's paper.
Congregational Church
Sunday school at 10 o'clock. Men's
discussion group takes up the ques
tion of disarmament. All men in
vited. Morning worship at 11. Com
munion and reception of members
with brief sermon by the. pastor on
"Christian Fellowship." Toung Peo
ples meeting at 6; 43. Evening serv
ice at 7:30. A service of prayer for
the Washington conference, with ser
mon on "Meals and Next Steps in In
ternational Affairs."
Christian Church
After the regular church hour Sun
day morning a basket picnic dinner
will be served, after which a business
meeting will be held.
Reading Room Association
The annual meeting of the Reading
Room association was held at the
readin" room Wednesday. The sec
retary's and treasurer's reports
showed financial conditions better
than for some time. The secretary
reported six magazines subscribed for
and presented a list of 27 late works
f fitinn to be added to the library
within a week. The present officers
were unanimously re-elected and the
standing committee appointed for the
year Dr. otroua uiiiue eumc v -i y
good suggestions for advertising the
library, which will be acted on by
the book committee. A list of the
w hnnks will be published as soon
as the books are ready for the shelves.
o
PIG CLUB DAY AT
GILBERT A SUCCESS
"Pig Club Day," held at Gilbert
last Saturday, proved to be a great
success. In accordance with the spirit
of the times Dr. Paul J. White con
ceived the idea that a show of the
pigs which the school boys had rais
ed would be an educational feature
of benefit to the community and
which at the same time would show
the patrons and friends that more
was being given the children than
"book larnin'.'
That the enterprise was a success
is not to be doubted from the en
thusiasm that was shown by all. The
credit for this must go to Dr. White
and R. W. Whitaker, superintendent
of the Goodyear hog farm, who in
augurated and fostered the work
from the opening of the contest last
May to its close. Frequent visits
were made to these boys homes and
advice and instruction given.
Each of the following boys showed
one or more pigs, all sows, that were
approximately seven months old and
averaging about 200 pounds: Fenton
Cooper. Melvin Cooper, Roy Ething
ton, John Freestone, Carlos Haymore
Ernest Hoefar, Kermit Lacy, Dwight
Millet, George Millet, Leroy Nichols,
Harold Pattee, John Sawyer, Millard
Sevey, Ethelbert Wilbur.
The boys entered the contest with
the understanding that it was to
learn how to grow pigs. As a result
they agreed that there was more to
the contest than an exhibit and that
awards should be made on a basis
that should include something more.
Thus the records that they kept wore
entered the same as the pigs. As a
final basis for the award the exhibit
was counted as 40 per cent and the
record. ,
Dr. J. C. Norton, a graduate of
Ames, was the exhibit judge. In ad
dition to his theory, his work in this
line is supplemented by his being a
practical hog man also. This judge
with the other two men, R. G. Pos
ter of Washington, D. C, V. S. Field
Agent Boys and Girls Club Work
and C E. Bowles, state supervisor of
agriculture. Phoenix, were secured
through the county egent, H. C.
Heard. The last two men, in con
junction with O. B. Ballantyne of the
University Extension service, judged
the records and made up the final
scores.
The first prize was a 7 months' old
boar pig given by the Southwest Cot
ton company. The local farm bureau
gave three additional prizes as fol
lows: $7.50 for second prize; $3 for
third prize and $2.50 for fourth prize.
The follov ing ,w-erethe winners of
the contest: John Sawyer, first prize:
Ethington Roy, second prize; Millard
Sevey, third prize; and Kermit Lacy,
fourth prize.
The people of Gilbert feel that this
kind of work will have a lasting val
ue and that it promises to become
one of the leading side lines in farm
life.
O :
News From The
NortHSide
GLEN DALE PEORIA
G. M. DEAN, Manager
Circulation, News, Advertising
Office: Carrick Realty Co.
Phone 2 " Glendale
5
MEET AT GLENDALE
GLENDALE, Nov. 4 A meeting of
the Glendale State bank deDositors
was held Thursday night and a large
number of the depositors were pres
ent. The meeting was called for the
purpose of investigating the pre
ferred claims of banks over individ
ual depositors. Counsel will be em-
pleyed to ascertain the standing that
the depositors have taken.
Baseball
All dyed-in-the-wool fans will re
ceive a real treat Sunday afternoon
when the Glendale Greys cross bats
with Phoenix Giants at the creamery
grounds. The game 'will be played on
a winner take all basis and both
sides will be out for blood. In the
last meeting of the two clubs, held
at Riverside park, Glendale came off
victorious by a score of 8 to 5. An
other feature of the game wi'd be
that the winner of the contest will
be entitled to meet the winner of the
White Sox-Tigers game.
Coor will be in the box for the
Greys and will rut the corners to
perfection, while Wiz White will do
mouna auty tor the Giants. This
game will be a winner.
Many Go to Phneniv
Many of the Glendale folk went to
Phoenix Friday night tn jiffpnrl the
Shakespeare play that is being put
on at me 1'noenix High school by
Mrs. Craigrer of the university.
Secures Contract
J. T. Trowbridge has secured the
contract tor the moving of the build
ings from the government poultry
itum west oi iiienta!e to the new lo
cation south of town.
Krig. ,en. W. D. Connor, of the
Lnnea states arm v. has bepn rlrs
lgnated ns the officer, who will be
aide to Marshal Foch in his visit to
this country. General Connor has a
distinguished record on the general
staff of the A. E. F.
1
DEPOSI
TO
FABLES OF 1921
Once there was a Position Holder vho did just
enough to Get By Charley was the Thirteen
Original Colonies of the famous Hookworm Family,
He owed every man in Town but two-and they
were New Arrivals Then Uncle died and left
the Bulk of his Boodle, to HiMrAN' Ywas Some Bulk.
Now Charley is the World's Best Long Distance!?
on the Fruits of Industry and hard Saving.
MORAL-Money makes the. Jaw go.
LITTLE BOYS AND
chosen for
OF WHICH I
ELSE SO - AH
AND
WILL
WASHINGTON FARM
BUREAU AND COnON
GROWERS TO MEET
Arrangements for a Joint meeting
with the Pimacotton Growers asso
ciation next Tuesday night were an
nounced yesterday by the Washing-J
ton District Farm bureau. ' The
meeting will be of especial impor
tance, as it is the first joint session
of the two organizations and. is ex
pected to lead to a close co-operation
between them. Mr. Hanks will be
chavman of the evening nd the
chief speakers will be Dwight B.
Heard, president of the Pimacotton
Growers' association, and Mr. Butter
worth. AH members of both or
ganizations are urged to attend.
The last meeting of the Washing
ton District Farm bureau, held last
Tuesday night, proved interesting to
everyone. The bureau has arranged
a series of worthwhile meetings, to
which the public is cordially invited,
and committees have been appointed
to t.-.ke care of -ertain matters of
general interest to the district. These
committees will report at all regular
meetings of the Washington Farm
bureau. The following is a list of
the committees and their special
duties, and the program for the se
ries of meetings, with the speakers
tentatively decided upon:
Committee on Entertainment and
Social Matters: meetings, club rela
tions, receptions; Rev. Mr. White,
chairman; Mrs. Aune, Mrs. Randle
man. 0
Committee on Cotton; Pimacotton
Growers association, cotton labor.
growing crop; Mr. Hanks, chairman;
Mr. Hess. Mr.' Hellworth.
Committee on Dairy and Cattle;
Mr. Grimes, chairman; Mr. Butler,
Mr. Miller.
Committee on Poultry; Mr. Arthur
G. Freeland, chairman; Mrs. A. So-
bey, Mr. Westfall.
Committee on Koaas ana irriga
tion: Water Users' association, roads.
upkeep of district; Judge GUDert,
chairman: Mr. Romey, Mrs. Lockett.
Committee on Fruits; citrus, decid
uous, graps ana smaii lruu; wr.
Brooks, chairman; Edward L. Free
land. Mr: Carper.
Committee on .Education ana wel
fare; schools, new members, welfare
of district; Mrs. letzian, cnairman;
Mr. Leak, Miss Freeland.
Committee on General Crops; Mr.
Wiggins, chairmEii; Mr. Reed, Mrs.
Thomason.
Proaram tor Meetings
All meetings to be held on Tues-
davs at 8 o'clock snarp.
Nov. 1 Monthlv meeting; report
on commi.ttees and program; visit of
dairy committee.
Nov. 8 Special cotton meeting;
Mr. Hanks, chairman; Mr. Butter
n-nrih. sneaker.
' Nov. 15 Special meeting: Mr.
Steele, chairman: Mrs. Shaw on
"Americanization."
Nov. 23 Special poultry meeting:
Mr. Westfal., chairman; poultry
speakers.
Dec. 6 Annual meeting; election
of officers.
Dec.13 Special fruit meeting; Mr.
Brooks, chairman; Prof. Crider, Mr.
Mote.
Jan. 3 Monthly meeting; reports
of standing committees.
Jan. 10 Special irrigation meeting;
president to preside; Governor Camp
bell. Jan. 17 Special taxation meeting;
Mr. Hess, chairman; Mr. Kuchler,
speaker.
Jan i Special meeting on crop
rotation: Mr. Butler, chairman: Mr.
Heard and Mr. Hayden, speakers.
j.-0l,. 7 Monthly meeting; reports
nf standing committees.
Feb 14 Special dairy meeting: Mr. j
Crimes, chairman; Professor Davis
and Mr. Dana.
ycb. 21 Special good roads meet
ing; " Mr. Romey chairman; Judge
Gilbert, speaker.
Feb. 2S Special co-operative mar
keting meeting: Mrs. lieatty, chair
man; Mr. Elliott, speaker.
March 7 Monthly meeting; reports
of standing committees.
March 14 Special child welfare
Ill f J.A. 1X1 M W V
By MARTIN
LITTLE GlRlS- I HAVE
my subject, work-work.
WOULD SAY THERE. IS NOTHING
- SO BEATIFIC fr WORK HARD. '
CHILDREN. AND SAVE YOUR PENNIES
ALL OF YOU, TOO,
SOME DAY BE
GREAT MEN.
meeting; Mrs. Irwin, chairman; Miss
Toles and Mr. Shepherd, speakers.
March 21 Special alfalfa meeting;
Mr- Leak, chairman; speaker to be
announced.
March 28 Special domestic sci
ence meeting: Mrs. Tetzlaff, chair
man; Miss Wills, speaker.
April 4 Monthly meeting; reports
of standing committees.
May 2 Monthly meeting; reports
of standing committees.
BOLL WEEVIL
HAS NO CHANCE HERE
. That the dreadtd boll weevil hasn't
a chance of being introduced into
this country is the opinion of a group
of Texans who recently had experi
ence with hnrHrulf iiral incnofra
and the vigilance of the state ento-
mologist's department.
Arriving here, the Texans were
stripped of a good bit of their- pos
sessions, including among other Items
the rag dolls of the two kiddies in the
party. The dolls were found t be
stuffed with cotton seed, and the
youngsters were so distressed that
D. C. Mote, state entomologist, "had
a heart" and took up a collection and
bought the best-looking dolls to be
found in down town shops, toys that
were free from pests.
Mattresses stuffed with, cotton
seed and trash were destroyed, as
were pillows, the "innards" of which
were alive with weevils.
Souvenirs from Dixie land met with
a like fate. The insnectora found
that the glassware, china and even
the food brought in from Texas was
pacKea with cotton seed, which
might have brought in an army of
insects had it not ben for the close
supervision of the state department
naving tne Inspection in charge.
-eSfoffl
Chicago
CHICAGO. Nov. 4. CATTLE 3.
000: Slow, generallv steadv- nnalitv
plain; beef steers of quality selling
largely at 6.508.25; veal calves
steady to strong; best vealers to
packers around HQ 11.25: to out
siders 11.75rdl2.-
HOGS 26.000: fairlv actlvn- steadv
to 10 cents higher than yesterday's
average; mostly 10 cents hic-her?
light lights and nles 1ft to 15 cents
higher; practical top 7.85: light
lights up to 8.15; pigs up to 8.30;
bulk 7.40S7.85; pigs mostly 10 to
15 cents higher; bulk desirables 8.15
8.25.
SHEEP 9,000: native and fed
western lambs mostly steady; no
rangers here; sheep dragging; fat
lambs to packers mostly at 9; some
held higher; fat ewes early mostly
3.504.50; no choice lights here.
Kansas City
KANSAS CITY. Nov. 4. CATTLE
1200; most grades and classes
around steady; quality plain: Texas
steers 5fi;6.20; no fed natives of
fered; cows 3. 50 ( 4. 25; few heifers
4&6; canners and cutters 2.501 3.50;
Texas bulls 2.903.35: best vealers
10; few stocKers and feeders 45.50;
heavy calves weak to 50 cents lower;
common Texas 4.50; medium to good
stock calves 5.35'fj 6.25.
HOGS 1;U0; closing aotive to
packers and shippers; strong to five
cents higher: bulk ISO to 200 pound
weights 7. 4 5 517. 50; one choice load
medium weights 7.55j bulk of sales
6.90'S7.50; packer top 7.55; bulk
throw-out generally around 6
6.50; pigs steady 7.75(0 8; nothing
choice offered .
SHEEP 4,000:killing classes slow;
most stock lambs around 4; best
western lambs offered 8.65; natives
8.25; feeding lambs 7.75.
Denver
DENVER. Nov. 4 CATTLE Sin ;
! 1 -
cows ana neuas a..)u:u vtiiwa u.iu
(ft 9.50; bulls 2fi3; stockers and
feeders 4.50'i6.
HOGS 300; steady; top S.23; bull;
71 8.10.
SHEEP 17.200; steady; lambs
7.30i 8.25: ewes
;.G0'(1 4.
feodcr,
lambs 7 'g 8.
BAR SILVER
NEW YORK, Nov. 4 l-"oi -eign bar
silver. 6a v. Mexican dollars, 53 1-i.
Republican A. P. Leased WlreJ
NEW YORK. Nov. 4 Trading in
Ixmds again overshadowed dealings
in all other securities on the stock ex
change toda,y. Various domestic and
foreign issues floated during the war
registered the highest prices for a
year or more.
Liberty bonds and Victory notes
continued to move forward under the
impetus given the investment demand
by nation wide indications of easier
credit conditions. Most of the Lib
erty series at their new higher rec
ords, showed extreme gains of from
10 to 100 points. Victory "3Vs were
at their maximum for a year and
Victory 4?i's duplicated yesterday's
record quotation of par.
Among the foreign bonds, many of
which suffered acute depression
while the war was in an' uncertain
1 stage, today's strength was the most
'marked in 'French government
eighths and Belgium government 7H'
I these gaining Yt and 3 points respec
: tively. Other European bonds, in
cluding many municipal issues dis
; played notable strength and Chilean
government eighths sold at premium
i over yesterday's subscription price.
Railroad bonds and similar issues of
domestic companies were only mod
' erately better, reflecting the uncertain
tone of the stock market. Total sales
par value, $22,275,000. Dealings in
l stocks were altogether governed by
' technical condition. Issues in which
1 the short interest was believed to be
dominant moved hesitatingly, but be
came heavy in the final hour when
call money rose from 5 to 51-5 per
cent. fcales amounted to 573,000
shares.
The foreign exchanges were fea
tured by another slump in German
marks to .43 cents and weakness in
Greek and Cenfal European remit
tances. British, French and Italian
bills were firm, improvement in ster
ling being associated with latest as
pects of the Irish situation.
I CHICAGO BOARD
CHICAGO No-. 4 Wheat scored
something of an upturn today after
' a fresh decline at the outset. An
accumulation of overnight selling or
i ders caused the initial wenkness,
which carried the December delivery
i down to 98 cen s a bushel. Esti-
I mates, however, that 20.000,000 bush
I els to 50,000.000 bushels had been sold
' to the seaboard and were still to be
shipped led to a rally, being taken
as an indication that the United
States has sold all of its exportable
surplus. Opening- quotations, which
varied from unchanged figures to lMe
lower, with December at 98 to 99,
and May at $1.03V4 to $1.03. were
followed by a rise all around to above
yesterday's finish.
Corn and oats developed independ
ent firmness. Corn opened un
changed to cent higher. May at
oO'Ti to 60 -i. and after a slight sag
made a moderate general ascent.
Oats stated cent off to a like
advance, May 35 to 35, and then
eased a little, but soon hardened with
corn.
Provisions reflected firmness in the
bog market.
COMMERCIAL BULLETIN
BOSTON. Nov. 4 The Commercial
Bulletin tomorrow will say: The gov
ernment wool auction has been the
center of all activity this week and
the strong sale which resulted shows
the fundamental soundness of the
American market. The business pri
vately has also been of fair propor
tions and at fully firm prices, with
medium to low grades tending to
! strengthen. In the goods market there
is little change.
Scoured basis: Texas fine 12 month
6 o ft 75) fine 8 months. 55fi60.
Territory: Fine ataple. choice, 80g)
85: halt blood combing, SS72
three-eighths blood combing, 50 3 35
quarter blood combing, 38 'it 42; fine
and medium clothing, 60Sf65; fine
and fine mediutn French combing,
65&70.
Pulled: elaine, 8085; A. A, 75
60: A. superiors, -60(270.
Mohair: Best combing, 27 6 30; best
carding, 22i25
DUN'S REPORT
NEW YORK. .Nov. 4 Dun's, to
morrow will say:
Response to the constructive forces
in economic situation does not come
quickly, but evidence of revival mul
tiply. The recovery would be more
rapid if fewer restraints were pres
ent, yet the gain is fairly steady and
there is promise of its continuance,
A further lowering of money rates
this week, reflecting the strength
ened banking position, is an encour
aging factor, and a lessening of price
unsettlement makes for more conn
dent operations in different quarters,
While all statistical barometers d
not reveal the improvement in busi
ness, records of production in sever
al basic industries are distinctly bet
ter, and a larger employment of man
ufacturing capacity tends to reduce
the volume of id'e labor. The latter
is still of such proportions as to tv
ert a potent influence on the public
purchasing power, but retail distrib
ution is somewaht stimulated as win
ter approaches, and offerings
goods at prices satisfactory to con
sumers are being absorbed with con
siderable freedom; Weekly bank
clearings, $6,831,630,000.
FOREIGN EXCHANGE
NEW YORK, Nov. 4. Foreign ex
change irregular: Great Britain de
mand 3.93: cables S.93; Franc
demand 7.38; cables 7.3S; Italy
demand 4.0SVi; cables 4.09; Belgia
demand 7.13: cables, 7.14; Ger
many, demand 434: cables 43i
Holland, demand 34.50; cables 34.3
Vnrwav. demand 13.65: Sweden, d
mand 23.10; Denmark, demand
18.60; Switzerland, demand 18.63;
Spain, demand 13.50; Greece, de
mand 4.15: Argentine, demand 32.50;
Brazil, demand 13.12; Montreal ex
change 92H.
COTTQN
NEW YORK, Nov. 4. Cotton
closed barely steady, net. one point
higher to six points lower; spot cot
ton quiet, middling 18.80c.
COTTON FUTURES
NEW YORK. Nov. 4. Cotton fu
tures closed barely steady: Dec
lS.40c; Jan., Ui.22c: March. 18.16c;
May, 17.88c; July, 17.42c.
METALS
NEW YORK. Nov. 4. Copper
steady electrolytic spot and nearby
13- later 131il3V4. Tin steady; spot
and nearby 2S.25; futures 28.62.
Iron steady unchanged. Lead steady;
spot 4.701i4.75. Zinc steady: East
St. Louis delivery spot 4. 73 H 4. SO.
Antimony spot 4.73.
LIBERTY BONDS
vnv YORK. Nov. 4. Liberty
bonds closed: 3'L.s 'J3..0; lust 4s
.r3.!i0 bid; second 4s VS.V; nrxt
f 4 . 1 4 ; second 4 'is 94. 3S: third 4 Us
..-, fourth 4'.s 94.42: Vivtory
aa.92; Victory is Stf.91.
PRODUCE
CHICAGO. Nov. 4. Potatoes un
settled: receipts 75 cars; total United
States shipments 782; Northern
white sacked and bulk 1.50(51.75
cwt.; North Dakota 1.00?1.60 cwt.;
Minnesota and North Dakota Red
River Ohios 1.55 '51.63 cwt.; South
Dakota round whites 1.00(3 1.35. cwt.
KANSAS CITY, Nov. 4. Butter
and eggs unchanged. Poultry, hens
c lower, log 21c; springs and tur
keys unchanged.
COPPERS
Compiled for The Repj jlicar. by
W. W. LAWHON
Logan 6V Bryan Private Wire
Commercial Hotel Bldg.
Anaconda 42
Butte & Superior lt'.i
Calumet and Arizona ... 51
Cerro de Pasco 30
Chile 12i
Chino 56 U
Greene-Cananea i 227s
nspiration 36 hi
Kennecott ' t 23'i
Miami 22i
Nevada Cons 12
Ray Cons 13s.
Utah 56
Big Ledge 31
Calumet & Jerome 16
33
18
80
12!
32
6
20
22
6
1SH
25
-2
27Vs
Dundee
60
Goodyear Tire
Goodyear Tire, pfd
10
31
4
lireen Monster
Jerome Verde ....
.. 15
Magma
21
4
Magma Chief
New Cornelia
Rey Hercules 21
United Eastern 2 A
Verde Extension 26
-
NEW YORK STOCK
EXCHANGE
Furnished by
W. W. LAWHON
Logan & Bryan Private Wire
Commercial Hotel Bldq.
American Beet Sugar 26'4
American Can 29ti
American International 35
American Smelt. & Refining .. 39
American Tel. & TeL Co. 10R
American Woolen 77
Atchison S3 '4
Baldwin Locomotive 90H
Baltimore & Ohio 37 -
Bethlehem Steel B) 55
Canadian Pacific 113Vs
Central Leather 39
Chesapeake & Ohio 54 14
Chandler Motor 43
C. M. & St, P. - 28 Vj,
C. R. 1. & P. Ry. 32S
Corn Products 87
Crucible Steel 63
Cuba Cane Sugar 7H
11TA
General Motors 104
Great Northern, pfd. 73
Great Northern Ore !Hi
Haskell & Barker 73
International Paper 62 14
Int. Merchant Marine, pfd 49
Invincible Oil 1014
Island Oil 3
Lackawanna Steel 414
Mexican Petroleum 105
Midvale Steel 24
Missouri Pacific 13H
New York Central 714
N. Y. N. H. & Harford ........ 131j
Norfolk & & Western s
Northern Pacific 4'i
Pan American Petroleum 4H
Pan American "B" 43
Pennsylvania 34?i
Pierce Arrow 14
Reading 69
Reo. Iron & Steel 494
Retail Stores 49i
Royal Dutch 47i
Sinclair Cons 22
Southern Railway 184
Southern Pacific 78'i
Studebaker Co 74i
Texas Co 42
Tobacco Products 59
United Food IIS
tf. S. Rubber 47 H
U. S. Steel
V. S. Industrial Alcohol 444
Union Oil-Delaware 20
Union Pacific ....lil
Vanadium Corp 31
Virginia-Carolina Chem ii'.j
Western Union 8
Westinghouse Electric 45t4
Willys-Overland 5
The Arizona Republican ia the rec
ognized want advertising medium of
Arizona.
RATE 1'2c per word per day, no
discount tor time or tpace;
cash with order; minimum
charge 25c.
PHONE YOUR ADS TO 4331
Ads received before 8 p. m. will be
properly classified. Atter 8 p. m.
will appear under "Too Late to
Classify" on following morning, and
thereafter under proper classifica
tion.
Orders bv mall should be accom
panied by remittance and addressed
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN
WANT AD DEPARTMENT
PHOENIX. ARIZONA
AUCTIONS
AUCTION
Jerry Doyle's
Auction Yard
THIRD AVE. & JEFFERSON ST.
Sat., Nov. 5, 1921
SALE CALLED AT 1:30 P. M.
Livestock
14 head of horses, 8 head of mules. 10
head of A-l dairy cows, mostly jer
seys; 150 chickens: lot of turkeys,
Furniture
A Nice Assortment Of
Farm Tools
Cultivators. Mowers. Plows, Planters,
Wagons. Buggies. Harness, Saddles
and other articles.
LIST YOUR PROPERTY WITH
US FOR AUCTION.
FREE ICE WATER FOR ALL.
C. O M'MURTRY. AUCTIONEER
J. P HANN'AN. Clerk It
PHOENIX AUCTION HOUSE
441 N. Center Street
Thone 4SS0
Auction every Saturday at 1 p. tn
We buy for cash or sell on commis
sion.
COLONEL JOE MASONER
AUCTIONEER t
AUCTIONS
Phoenix Auction
Ho'use
441 North Center St.
Saturday, Nov. 5,
1:30 P.M.
Beautiful brass bed spring and
mattress, old ivory bed and spring,
bungalow cots, handsome library ta
bles, round oak dining table, dress
ers, commodes, center tables, dining
chairs, rockers, mattresses, piano
stools and benches, good , incubator,
cream separator, phonograph, old vio
lin, bamboo set, sideboards, and gas
plates, gas Stoves, oil cook Btoves, oil
and wood heaters, gas heaters, quilts
blankets and bedding, dishes asd
cooking utensils, and a yard full of
other gpod stuff. Bring, your goods
to a real auction house where you get
a square deal and more money. Ev- '
erybody welcome.
COLONEL JOE MASONER,
AUCTIONEER. It
Auction
Saturday, Nov. 5
10:30 A.M.
27 South Fifth Ave.
Oil heaters, blue enamel and plen
ty of common ones; 2 gas ranges,
wood heaters one extra good dining
table and chairs to match, 5 dressers,
beds, spring and mattress, shot guns,
rocking chairs. 1 extra fine china
closet, 2 good 10x12 tents, rugs, dish
es and clothing; also several com
forters, 1 double barrel shotgun. List
your goods early. We have the buy
ers. Your goods will bring more mon
ey at Guess's Auction. 1 kitchen
cabinet. Phone 4779. We buy or
sell on commission. We bel!ove busi
ness goes where it is invited and re
mains where it is well treated.
J. B. GUESS THE AUCTIONEER 1
2 FOR SALE REAL ESTATE
5 Acre Snap
Located on Orange Road, between
McDowell and Van Buren; one room
cozy little bouse; only S1S00 and J400
cash will handle. Exclusive with
Live Wire Realty Co., 142 West Ad
ams; Phone 1353. I
$15 Per Acre
160 acres near Glendale;. 14 down;
water paid, some plowed, good soiL
D. H. CLARIDGE REALTY CO.
15 S. Center Phone 1601 169!
tf
Lots For Sale
on northeast and northwest corner
of Palm Lane and Seventh street.
Owner can be seen at house on the
nfrtbast comer. . tf
WE HAVE customers who want to
lease land for cash rent and share
rent. Come in and list your ranch.
Butterf ield Realty
34 East Adams. Phone 3565. 1
For Exchange
An acre, all in bearing lemons and.
oranges in Ontario. CaL The 'price
is low at 31800. Want to trade on
house in Phoenix as first payment.
What have you? See
FRED A. DIBBLE, REALTOR
17 North First Ave.; Phone 5003. I
5 Acres, $2200
5 -room adobe house: large screen
chicken houses; on Orange road: a
real snap; only JS00 required. Ex
clusive with Live Wire Realty Co..
HJ west p. an m s : Phone 1353. I
FOR SALE 06-acre ranch and
cows, JS000; $1500 cash; might con
sider good automobile, tf. B. Duncan.
irginia Ave. p
LOT 60 by 145. cement walk and
curb, garage 16 by 18 with cement
floor, water and electricity. Price
io. Kasy terms. Phone 3640. I
TWO acres clean garden soil. Very
good house, garage, chicken houses
and runs. Electric lights. Abundant
shade and fruit. 34000.00 Easy
terms to responsible party or will
take city property or good paper for
first payment. Box 34D Republi
can, m
CHOICE corner lot, 75x145. Kenil-
worth addition; suitable for apart
ment: will sacrifice for cash. See
owner, 210 S. 3rd Ave. r
FOR SALE One acre, house.
chicken yard, northeast, close, 835
down and $35 monthly. Owner, Box
4D, Republican. m
LAST CALL
10 Acres in Orangewood at the
street car. Price $3S00.
Cheapest
ever sold in Orangewood.
the bargains?
NUNNELEY
Realtor
29 N. 1st Ave.
Who sells
FOR SALE
Charming air the year round home.
situated on a sunny slope with ex
cellent drainage.
The house is in perfect condition.
with hardwoo'd floors throughout, has
12 rooms, 3 bath rooms and attrac
tive large cozy billiard room, and the
view over the Riverside Valley is su
perb. The grounds of 2 acres have
splendid shade trees and large lawn
with a cottage and garage for three
motors. Back of these are 12 acres of
hill land . with great possibilities.
Price $19,500.
A 13-arre frostless orange grove.
one half Valencias and one half Na
vels, well fertilized, in A-l condition.
can be bought in connection wltn mis
home for $15,000 extra.
For further particulars and photo
graphs apply to
PATTERSON & FI.A HKKTI
667 EIGHTH STREST
RIVERSIDE. C A 1.1 FO R N I A ro
THREE full-sized excellent build
ing lots, one block from paving; $900
tor three. Tauber. 1U7 N. 1st St. n
THREE blocks from Osborn school,
lti acres, new house; termi to suit
buyer. Warren E. Pomeroy, Claren
don and Fourth Avenues. rn
2V ACRES, 4 -room brick, two
litrse porches, fruit, shade, well
fenced; bargain for cash. Corner
11th St. and Little Maricopa canal.
2H0 N. 11th St. bk
20 FOR THE PRICE OF 10
Whv- pav $5,000 for 10 acres when
vqu can buy 20 acres for $6,000?
Four-room frame house, good well,
shade and every acre fine sandy loam
garden soil; close to school, on pave
ment; $-'iii.i0 will handle. A real sac
rifice of close in acreage. See
Wheeler with Meyers Investment Co..
33 Kirt Av. I'hnpf 4!0. n
FOR SALE HOUSES
I'.I.T i..'in owner; S2"i; -rooiu
$24
modern house: jpst finisned. on U-ri i
rr-r line; North 10th Street; sma'l
payment down, rest $30 per month.
1 hw-.e 2153. b''

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