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Arizona republican. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, December 30, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1921-12-30/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
OB
ANY HOUR DAY A NO NIGHT
25 CENT SERVICE
4 4 2 2
BLACK AND WHITE
TAXICAB CO.
STAND AT HOTEL ADAMS
SPECIALISTS
In Examination of Eyss and fitting
f correct
Glasses
NORTHRUP OPTICAL CO.
9 East Adams Street
Phone 6090 for Appointment
ICE
Office
CI N. 4th St
Phone
5066
PLUMBING
HONEST WORK. FAIR PRICES
; Send me your work for
' quick and efficient service
" O. E. BELLAS
620 Nprth Firat St. -Phone 2875
CONSTABLE ICE &
FUEL CO.
WOOD ANO COAL
Phone 1555
Fourth Ave. and Jackson St
Choicest of Blooms for all occas
ions. Designers of
Floral Art.
j Central
Grana---p,nt Show Rooms.
18-24 W. Van Buren
VALLEY MACHINE
WORKS
Machine Work and Welding
Phona 1085
306 8outh Seventh Avenue
Ten 85c Records Free
Two Dimes a
day pays for
your
ilverol
'4
at a saving from $35
om
: to you $
rzx i
to $75. Direct
from eastern
facturer who
lives in Phoen
Racey Music
Company
27 East Adams St.
tTrO.
1 1
1
S
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
SPECIALS
"Better Goods for Less Money"
JELLO, all flavors,
3 pkgs. for . . . :
Kingsford Corn or Gloss Starch, 1 An
Perpkg. AU '
Calumet Baking Powder,
Mb. for
Canned Walnuts,
Per tin . ;
Premier Salad Dressing,
Large bottle
.Red Karo,
5 lbs. for
Del Monte Mammoth
Asparagus Tips
Del Monte Sliced Pineapple,
No. 2 can
Closed All Day Monday
- NEW YEARS
Wetzler's Central Market
First Avenue at Washington
Wetzler's Arcade Mkt. Grocery
Washington at First Street
Wetzler's Basketeria
127 North First Avenue
"Phoenix' Most Popular Cash and Carry
Groceries"
WATER REPORT
Reservoir, elevation 172.32
Reservoir, contents, acre feet. 623,382
Gain, 24 hours 2.437
Elevation .year ago
Contents, year ago
Water used, north side ..
Water used, south side....
196.9G
.963.173
. 2S.360
. 36.901
WEATHER REPORT
Stations oil C
s . o
o a
C : : :
Boston 18 38 Clear .00
Buffalo 12 30 Clear .00
Chicago 24 28 Clear .00
Denver 46 54 Cloudy .00
Flagstaff 44 58 Cloudy .00
Fresno 56 68 Rain .00
Galveston 64 70 Clear .00
Kansas City .. 34 40 Clear .00
Lob Angeles .. 70 7,2 Cloudy .00
Minneapolis ... 24 24 Cloudy .00
Needles 62 66 Clear .00
N'ew Orleans .. 62 68 Clear .00
New York 18 40 Clear .02
Oklahoma 46 56 Clear. .00
PHOENIX .... 68 76 Cloudy .00
Pittsburg 18 34 Clear .00
Portland. Ore.. 38 40 Pt. Cldy .10
St. Louis 28 30 Clear .00
Salt J.ake City 38 42 Cloudy .00
San Diego 68 76 Cloudy , .00
San Francisco.. 54 66 Rain ' .06
Sattle 40 42 Clear .08
Spokane 30 30 Cloudy .00
Tampa 64 67 Clear .00
Tucson 78 84 Clear .00
Washington ... 30 42 Clear .00
Winnipeg 20 24 Clear .00
Yuma 64 70 Ft. Cldy .00
Local Weather Yesterday
6 a.m. Noon 6 p.m.
Temp., dry bulb... 48 68 68
Temp., wet bulb... 46 E9 60
Humidity, per cent 83 64 64
Wind from E E NW
Wind, miles 4 2 3
Rainfall 0 0 0
Weather Clear Ft. Cldy Cloudy
Highest yesterday 76
Highest this date for 26 years.... 80
Lowest yesterday .......46
Lowest this date for 26 years 2S
Total rainfall 00
Excess in temperature yesterday,
11 degrees.
Excess in temperature eince the
first of the month, 115 degrees.
Accumulated excess in temperature
since Jan. 1, 4.62 degrees.
Normal precipitation Jan. 1 to date,
7.83 inches.
Actual precipitation Jan. 1 to date,
3.85 inches.
Deficiency since Jan. 1, 3.98 inche.
Today: Time of sunrise, 7:31 a.
m.: sunset, 6: SI p. m.; moon seta,
6:37 a. m.
ROBERT Q. GRANT.
o
JEWISH SERVICES TONIGHT
Regular Jewish services will be held
at the Administration building at 8
o'clock tonight when the Rabbi. Dr.
David Liknaitz, will speak on "The
Macca beans." Mrs. Bessie Fox Da
vis will be the soloist. Classes 'in
religion will be held tomorrow and
Sunday mornings. The Hanukkah
celebration by the children of the Re
ligious school will be held at 8:30
o'clock Sunday night under the aus
pices of the Junior Beth Israel.
TO DESIGN BRIDGES Merrill
Butler, bridge engineer with the state
highway department, will leave today
for Prescott, acting on the request of
the Tavapai county highway com
mission, which has asked Mr. Butler
to design four bridges Included in its
county program. The field work
will require several days after which
plans and specifications will be
worked up In the Phoenix office.
Mr. Butler's assistance in the county
program is in line with the policy of
the state highway department in co
operating with the counties in handl
ing work requiring specialists. Mr.
Butler designed the bridges in Pinal
and Gila counties, which were con
structed by county funds.
. o
THE FRATERNAL BROTHER
HOOD WATCH PARTY
Dance the old year out and the new
year in with us. at K. of P. hall.
Admission 25 cents. Refreshments.
adv. gb
PHOENIX LODGE NO.
2 K. of P., will meet Fri
day evening, Dec. 30, at
7:30 .. o'clock. Visitors
welcomed.
JOHN B. SLOAN.
It Acting C. C.
25c
I
25c
53c
44c
33c
...38c
22c
THE ARIZONA REPUBLICAN, PHOENIX,
MasbsEjiaaBii
- WATCH PARTY TOMORROW
The Christian Endeavor of the Chris
tian church will hold a "watch" party
at the church tomorrow night.
DISABLED VETS' MEETING
The Phoenix branch of the Disabled
American Veterans of the World war
will meet at the chamber of com
merce at 7:30 o'clock this evening.
DINNER POSTPONED The Cart
wright Missionary society which was
to have given a dinner at the Central
Methodist church tomorrow has post
poned the event until January 14,
k place.
STANFORD CLUB DINNER A
pleasant dinner was given last even
ing by Stanford Club when 30 of its
members met around the table in the
private dining room of the Hotel
Adams.
ANNUAL MEETING The annual
state meeting and election of officers
for the Arizona Children's Home as
sociation will be held on Friday. De
cember 10, at 2:30 p. m., at the T. W.
C. i A., rooms in Tucson. All mem
bers are requested to be present.
WILL ENTERTAIN PUPILS
Miss Nellie Trott, director of the
Sherwood Music School branch, will
entertain the pupils of the school
from 2 o'clock until 4 o'clock tomor
row afternoon. Pupils from the
piano, vocal ana violin departments
will give a short program.
NO FORD PRICE CUT Ed Ru
dolph, local Ford distributor, last
night received a telegram from the
Ford factory stating that contrary to
recent rumors and newspaper reports
there would be no drop in prices on
January 1. The telegram stated that
there is no foundation to the rumors,
and as the factory does not contem
plate such a price reduction it em
phatically denies the report.
DEMAND FOR WOLF PELTS
That there is a steady and remuner
ative market for wolf pelts is the
gist of a letter received by the cham
ber of commerce yesterday from an
eastern fur company which is anx
ious to buy Arizona wolfskins. Buy
ers are clamoring for the skins, the
letter says, and trappers are urged
to send their available wolf pelts
even in small lots, as the demand is
insistent.
MISSES PHOENIX SUNSHINE
It seems difficult for former resi
dents here to forget the valley, , its
inter sunshine and fertile farm lands.
Writing from California. B. F. Good
win, former business man and citrus
grower of this city, declares he longs
for the warm sunshine of Phoenix in
winter and takes advantage of the
occasion to state he has not found a
country with more resources and
possibilities than Arizona. Mr.
Goodwin now is division sales man
ager for A. Schilling and company
of San Francisco.
SUE RAILWAY COMPANY In a
suit filed yesterday against the Ari
zona Eastern Railway, company and
James C. Davis, federal railway
agent, James Malloch and Joseph D.
Taylor, as J. Malloch and company,
seek to recover $38,765.50 alleged to
have been, lost by them because of
a delay in transit of two shipments
of cotton from Mesa to Providence.
R. I., in 1920. Both shipments, they
allege, left Mesa on February 4,
1920. One shipment, consisting of 53
bales, arrived In November, 1920,
and the other of 54 bales arrived on
August 1, 1920. Because of the de
lay, they allege, they were forced to
sell one shipment for 80 cents a
pound and the other for 50 cents,
whereas if the cotton had arrived
within three months after shipment
they could have sold it for $1.25 a
pound.
LEAVES FOR SOUTH George
R. Hill, assistant attorney general,
left last evening for the southern
part of the state 1n the interests of
his office , Mr. Hill will go first to
Tucson, where he will represent the
state in the action for damages
brought by Contractor Campbell, who
claims that by the failure of the uni
versity to furnish certain material
he was delayed in carrying out a
contract with the university and so
unable to take over other -ork. He
is asking for $6,000. In fCogales Mr.
Hill will appear for the state in a
suit brought by J. B. Robinnon and
A. A. McCluskey, who are stekins to
collect $1,000 fire insurance on their
automobile, a policy carried by the
Arizona Fire Insurance company,
which has been taken over by the
state. From Nogales Mr. Hill will
go to Tombstone in the interests of
the state in the Thomas Higgms es
tate, from which it claims an inheri
tance tax amounting to $35,000.
TO "SAY IT WITH COPPER"
The Miami Boosters Club intends to
"say it with copper" upon the occa
sion of the formal opening of the
Superior-Miami highway, which 'ac
cording to present plans 'will occur
about the first of April. A copper
plate, made from metal produced
from the mines of that locality, is in
process of manufacture at the present
time. On it will be inscribed the
history of the highway, which will be
one of the finest in the state, both
from a scenic and construction stand
point. Governor Campbell has been
asked to participate in the ceremonies
and has consented to make a- few
remarks. As he signed both of the
bills appropriating mdney for this
road and as it has been constructed
under his administration he is in a
position to tell the economic and
other reasons which will be advanced
by its completion. The Miami poo
pie expect a large crowd at the cele
bration, having invited the notables
of the state to join in the celebra
tion. Invitations to the delegates
to the Bankhead National Highway
and United States Good Roads asso
ciation convention, which will be
meeting in Phoenix at that time, will
also be extended.
AR1-Z0NA
MASH
MANUFACTURED
AND
FEED COJnc.
PHOENIX. ARIZ.
O
I
OBITUARIES
Death of George Gearhart
George Gearhart of 56 Vernon
avenue died yesterday afternoon.
He came witii his family to the Salt
River valley from Dallas. Texas,
about two years ago and made a
success of cotton growing. He is
survived by his wife and a daugh
ter. Janice. Funeral services will be
held at the A. L. Moore chapel at 2
o'clock this afternoon. The Rev. Ar
thur Lee Odell will officiate.
o
r
Born
BAfMERT To Mr. and Mrs.
Andrew Baumert, Jr., Thursday, De
cember 29. a son. Mr. Baumert, gen
eral manager of the Tucson Citizen,
arrived In the city last Saturday in
anticipation of the event.
DANCE POSTPONED The dance
which was to have been given at the
Madison Improvement Club has been
postponed..
RETURNING TO WILLIAMS
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Benham will re
turn to Williams today after . a
several days' stav in Phoenix.
UNDELIVERED TELEGRAMS
The Western Union is holding tele
grams for A. P. Hendrickeon, Charles
A. Dutro, George W. White, P. E.
Hoddleston. Miss Jessie Moran. L. H.
Johnson and A. J. LeBarrson.
RECEIVE $43.000 The state high
way department received $43,000 in
federal aid funds yesterday. The
amount will be applied on three fed
eral aid projects now under wav.
THESE WILL WED Licenses to
marry were Issued yesterday to
Hugh Campbell. 55. and Serapia
L nas. Doth of Glendale; and Abslem
T. Young, 19. and Minnie P. Satter
field, 17. both of Phoenix.
CHARGES DISMISSED On
grounds of Insufficient evidence.
Justice McKee yesterday dismissed
three charges of forgery brought
against Jeff I Smith, upon motion
Of the defendant.
TO RETURN TUESDAY Justice
E. J. Flanigan of the supreme court,
who is spending holiday week in
Bisbee, will not return to town until
Tuesday. Justice Flanigan made his
home in Cochise county before being
appointed to the bench.
ENTERTAIN AT DINNER Mr.
and Mrs. W. J. Osborn of Peoria gave
a dinner Tuesday night in honor of
their daughter, Miss Dorothea. The
guests were Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Moore, Lee Moore, Jack Griffin and
Miss Helen Ellis. Christmas decora
tions were used effectively.
PAY HONOR TO DEAD Resolu
tions of regret at the death of Hiram
Phillips, noted consulting engineer of
St. Louis, in anautomobile accident
last week, and at the death of Gen
era! A. J. Sampson, prominent
Phoenix citizen and former minister
to Ecuador, at his home here, were
adopted by the board of directors of
Ihe chamber of commerce at Its
meeting vesterdav.
MINER KILLED James Mulla
ney was killed in an accident at the
Inspiration mine Thursday, accord
ing to a wire received yesterday by
Jack White, state mine inspector,
from his deputy, J. J. McManus. Mr.
McManus did not state in his mes
sage how the tragedy occurred. He
reported that an examination had
been made and that the details
would be forwarded his chief later
in the week.
SEEKING BROTHER Genevieve
Tracy of Box 82. San Francisco,
writes The Republican making in
quiry about her brother, William
Augustus Paterson, who she sup
poses may be in this part of the
country. He served in the war and
was honorably discharged. - He
went from San Francisco to San
Diego, where he worked for a while,
and then went to the Imperial Val
ley. The writer says that she has
very important news, and good news,
for him.
SISTERHOOD PARTY Sister
hood Temple Beth Israel gave a de
lightful hanukkah party Wednesday
evening at the residence of Mrs. W.
S. Solomon, 508 . West Lynwood
street, for members of the organiza
tion and their families. The pro
gram was furnished entirely by chil
dren, the small folk who took part
including Sylvia Granow, Bernard
Funk. Ruth Edelman, Floria Wein
berger, Birdie Steinberg, Marion
Weinberger. Beatrice Epstein and
Myer Steinberg.
govemSpts
provisions of act
Governor Campbell, contingent up
on favorable action by the legisla
ture, has accepted for the state of
Arizona the provisions of the Shep-pard-Towner
act, commonly known
as the U. S. maternity and Infancy
act, and has designated the child
hygiene division of the Arizona state
board f health as the co-operating
agency to carry on this work in
Arizona.
The acceptance by the governor
means there is available to the state
for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1922, the sum of $17,253.71, of whicb
$10,000 is given outright and $7,253.71
additional if matched dollar for dol
lar by the state, and for the succeed
ing five years a total of $12,233.71
annually, $5,000 given outright and
$7,253.71, if matched by the state.
One of the provisions attached to
the appropriation is that the state
must submit to the federal board the
plans it proposes to follow in the
expenditure of the funds. Arizona is
in a position to accept this offer
from the federal government without
appropriating any more money than
has a ready been made available b'
legislative action for this line of
work.
The purpose of the act Is to pro
mote the welfare and hygiene of
maternity and infancy, the operating
machinery being a board of mater
nity and infant hygiene which thall
consist of the chief of the children's
bureau, the surgeon general of the
United States public health service
and the United States commissioner
of education. The chftdren's bureau
of the department of labor is charged
with the administration of the act
and the chief of the children's bu
reau is designated as the executive
officer.
o
Average of more than 250,000 let
ters every day are readdressed in
New York from city directories.
o
Russia now has 67 higher technical
institutions with 39.00 students.
rmim
Sun Wind DusfCindere
pECOHMfNOCDwSOtO BV DRUGGISTS OP7ICliS
kttJE FOB fB EYE MUftl&E CO. CtHCAiO
a?em
"1
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FRIDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 30, 1921.
CHURCH TO HOLD
CANDLE SERVICE
There will be a unique sen ice at
the First Baptist church. Third ave
nue and Monroe street. Saturday
evening. The congregation will meet
for a social session at 9 o'clock. ..An
attractive program of songs and reci
tations will be given and coffee and
doughnuts will be served.' A troop
of Boy Scouts will be present to-,
give a scout program under the
leadership of E. C. Reeves, boys'
work secretary of the Y. M. C. A.
Miss Barbara Shanks will give a
reading, the choir and others will
sing and social games and enter
tainment will fill up the time.
Then at 11 o'clock a candle light
ing service will be held. This will
be participated in by the pastor, dea
cons of the church and 24 girls
dressed In white. It will be given in
the form of a pageant of light rep
resenting the whole year and 12
missionary fields. The whole con
gregation will participate in the
closing part of the pageant. Each
person present will be given a beau,
tiful candle and holder. - These can
dles will be lighted by the girls and
a processional Including all will
close the program with a brief con
secration service to the Lord of
Light.
Earlier In the evening the stew
ardship league will meet for busi
ness. This meeting is called for 7:30
o'clock and will be presided over by
Dr. W. W. Watkins. The pastor,
the Rev. E. H. Shanks, will lead in
the pageant at 11 o'clock and have
charge of the closing consecration
service.
All interested In the First Baptist
church are cordially invited and
assured a good time. Friends of the
church will be cordially welcomed.
o -
E
In answer to an affidavit filed by
H. C. Sprunger, former cashier of
the Central Bank of Wlckenburg.
several days ago with a motion to
set aside an indictment returned
against him by the coUhty grand
Jury, on the grounds that although
he appeared as a witness in the case
his name was not inserted in the in
dictment as such, and that persons
other than those permitted by ls.w
were present when the indictment
was under consideration. George D.
Christy, deputy county attorney, yes
terday filed a counter-affidavit de
nying the allegations of Sprung-ir.
On November 10, 1921, Christv al
leges in his affidavit, Fred J. Elliott,
local attorney whom Sprunger al
leges was present with the grand
Jury when- the indictment r. gainst
him was considered, was called by
the grand jury as special counsel
and legal advisor to the grand Jury
and took the oath aa special prose
cutor. Prior to the taking of the
oath, Christy says, Elliott was called
before the grand Jury tj testify but
not on matters which had to do with
the indictment against Sprunger.
The placing of his name as a witness
on the Indictment against Sprunger
was an error, Mr. Christy declared.
. The motion made by Sprunger to
set aside the indictment has been
taken under advisement by Judge
Stanford. Sprunger is charged in
the indictment with receiving de
posits in an insolvent bank while an
officerof the Institution.
Several deaths from carbon mon
oxide poisoning which have occurred
in garages have been responsible for
the action taken by the bureau-of
public health service requesting the
aiirereni states In Issuing license
tags for motor vehicles to furnish a
list of precautious to be observed.
The government has prepared a
warning to all automobile owners di
recting their attention to the danger.
The investigations made by the
government show that gases dan
gerous to life are frequently present
in the exhaust gaaes from automo
biles. These gases are often present
in sufficient quantities to produce
disagreeable symptoms, or even
cause death. ' The effect of these
gases is produced very quickly,
usually before the victim realizes the
danger.
Observe the following precautions
at all times, the health service rec
ommends: 1. Always open the garage door
before starting the engine.
2. Do not allow the engine to run
for any length of time in a closed
garage.
7. Do not work near the exhaust of
a running automobile engine.
4. Special precautions as to venti
lation are necessary when in garage
pits.
5. When the exhaust Is used for
heating a closed car, the system must
be free from leaks.
Persons overcome by eThaust gases
COUAITER AFFIDAVIT
FILED IN DANK CAS
DANGEROUS CASES
IN AUTO EXHAUST
CONSULT YOUR
DIRECTORY
New Telephone Directories containing many
number changes, are now being delivered. Before
using a telephone be sure to refer to the new di
rectory for your number. Delivery of the new
books should be completed by Saturday. If yours
has not been received by that time let us know.
Mountain States Telephone
and Telegraph Company
STRIKING BANNER
ASSSTS
T
REVIVAL SERVICES
"Will your home in heaven be for
rent or will you occupy It yourself?"
reads a large banner on the pulpit at
the revival services now in progress
at the First Methodist Episcopal
church, w-here the pastor. Dr. J. A.
Stavely, assisted by the Conner Trio.
Is nightly bringing a message to his
people. The oblect of his sermon last
night was "I have finished the work
which thou gavest me to do."
The Conner Trio gave the following
numbers prior to the address of Dr.
"I Am Happy in Him," " Have Thy
Own Way, Lord," which were Inter
spersed with the singing of man)
revival songs by the congregation.
A duet, "In a Garden." was given by
Mrs. Conner and "Little Bill" Conner.
. Dr. Stavely in his address, which
set forth the character of Jesus, said:
"The work of Jesus was to the wreck
caused by sin and to restore man
to the favor of his maker. Sin came
and formed an Impassable gulf be
tween man and his maker, onlv to
be bridged by Christ, the Savior. This
son left the shining courts of glory
and came unto the lowly manger in
crowded -Bethlehem. He lived the
sinful life of mankind, holy, perfect
In man's presence then he gave his
life as ransom, freely, for us upon
Calvary, crying from the rugged
cross tree, 'it is finished, it la fin
ished,' thus atonement was com
pleted. Thus the prince of power of
darkness is dethroned by the blessed
Savior In the hearts of whomsoever
will to do his bidding."
This afternoon there will be a spe
cial program at 2 o'clock for the
children, including the eighth grade.
The special program for tonlgnt'a
service beginning at 7:30 o'clock, will
Include songs in Chinese. Japanese
and Turkish and sleight of hand
tricks which will be exposed so that
the children may understand them.
On Sunday afternoon a special meet
ing for women and girls, led by Mrs.
Conner, will bo held in the basement
ot the church at I o'clock.
LEWIS ARRAIGNED
ON FIFTH CHARGE
Phil K. Lewis, former president of
the Central Finance corporation,
yesterday was arraigned before Jus
tice Nat T. McKee on a charge of
obtaining money by means of false
pretenses. The preliminary hearing
of the case was set for 10 o'clock
on the morning of January 26. 1922.
Lewis was released under a bond of
$1,000. which he furnished. The bond
was signed by Harry Kay and J. C.
Chitson as securities.
. Tt-.e complaint, which was filed
against Lewis on Wednesday, charges
him with securing $10,000 from Louis
J. Hart, a local attorney, in Decem
ber. 1919, after representing to him
thatten bonds o( the Central Fi
nance corporation of the par value of
i,uuo each were a good and safe
security. The complaint alleges
Lewis knew the bonds were worth
less when he sold them to Hart.
Lewis also is under four indict
ments returned by the county grand
Jury. Demurrers to the Indictments
filed by Lewis have been taken un
der advisement by Judge Stanford,
who will render a decision in a few
days' -
TOOK TTlashlight
Because his two companions had
flashlights and he had none. Jack
Mark, 14, last night came to the con
elusion he must have one also if life
were to be worth living. Not having
the money with which to acquire one
in the usual manner, he set out with
his two companions to find one. In
his search he came upon one of the
sheriff's cars standing beside the
county Jail, and there his quest for
the desired flashlight ended.
That was the story he told in the
sheriff's office last night after
special officer had arrested him in
the act of removing a flashlight from
the car. His companions ran and
officers are now searching for them
to see if they have a box of shells
and a pair of handcuffs which are
missing from the car. As the offi
cers know who they are. they expect
to pick them up when they go home.
Stark said he had made two trips
to the car and took the shells the
first time. He told officers where he
had cached the shells before coming
bark after the flashlight, but a search
of the place failed to reveal the shells.
He denied all knowledge of the hand
cuffs. from automobiles and gasoline en
gines should be. removed to fresh, air
and artificial respiration performed
until a physician arrives.
FROM SHERIFF'S CAR
NEW
BOOKS
ADDED
TO LOCAL LIBRARY
Books aded to the Phoenix Public
Library during the past week:
Fundamentals of Prosperity, Rog
er W. Babson; When the Workmen
Help You Manage, Wm. R. Bassett;
American Government and Politics,
Chas. A. Beard; History of Ameri
can Literature, Percy Holmes Boyn-
ton; Seven Centuries of Brass Mak
ing, Bridgeport Brass Co.; Letters
and Leadership, Van Wyck Books;
Life of Sr Stanley Maude. Sir Chas.
E. Callwell; Old at Forty or Toung
at Sixty, Robert S. Carroll; Through
British Guiana to the Summit of
Roraima; Ireland, the Outpost.
Grenville Cole; Wonders of Natural
History, Archie K. Collins; Common
Diseases of Farm Animals, Robert
A. x Craig: America via the Neigh
borhood, John Daniels; Mica Miners'
and Prospectors' Guide, Archibald A.
Dickson; Woman Who Waits, Fran
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