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Albuquerque evening citizen. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1905-1907, July 01, 1905, Image 1

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iyLBUaUEMaUE EVENING CITIZEN",
VOLUME 10
ALHUOUKKQUE, NEW MEXICO, FKIDAY EVEN! NO, jjLY 1, IDO.l.-TWELVE PAOES ' J NUMBER 173
RLE
Warsr.w. July 1. A terror-stricken
governor, a disorganized police force,
the czai'a authority defied, assassina
tion striking at the opportune' mo
ment; that 1b Warsaw at the present
time The situation In the city is
unique In Russian history. All the
governing officials are In dally fear of
their Uvea, many of them are resign
ing their offices, and those who re
main are Impotent to stamp out the
veiled Insurrection that exists In Po
land's capital.
The town la practically controlled
by the Socialists; they aie. the rul
ers In everything but name, and they
direct what the police shall do or
shall not do, exacting more obedience
than Is given to the orders of the St.
, Petersburg bureaucracy. Many of
these Socialists are Jews.
Since the fateful Vladimir day In
St, Petersburg there has been formed
In Warsaw an almost pel feet terror
ist organization. A brigade of Social
ists has been recruited, numbering
- ,000.
, J They are men sworn to put a stop
i to the wrongs of Poland s laboring
classes, and they have succeeded in
their oliject. Political spying and
attempts to disband the working
men s organisation have ceased, and
the police In Warsaw are slmpiy ex
ercising their functions of guarding
the city against cilminalg and male
factors.
' Owing to the continual attempts of
the Socialists upon the lives of police
officers -who have tried to Interfere
with the worklngmen's organization,
a panic exists In the force such as has
bad no counterpart in Poland since
the Russian occupation of the coun
try. During the past five months 400 po
licemen have resigned from the force,
fearing that if they did not leave the
city they would be assassinated. It
lias been absolutely impossible to se
cure men to take the places of the
departed constables, and the Waisaw
police department, which has a nor
mal roll of 1,000 men, bas at the
present time less than 600.
Lieutenant "Gontarew, one of the
higher police officials, who was sen
tenced to death by the Socialists, has
become mad through fear, and Is now
In the Warsaw military hospital. Lleu-
ALMOST IN A MOMENT
SECRETARY HAY DIES
So Rapidly Did Death
Considered Well, the Family Failed to Reach
Room in Time. to Bid Him Farewell.
Newbury, N. H., July 1. John Hay,
secretary of state, died today at his
home on the shore of Lake Sunapee.
The hour of bis passing was 12:25
this morning. His last moments
were peaceful and without a struggle.
The suddenness of It was staggering.
At midnight all was quiet. Then
came a call for physicians. There
was a collapse, and twenty-five min
utes alter, all was over. Death was
caused by pulmonary embolism.
t Dr. Scudder, who was at the bed
Bide, said that last night Mr. Hay
bade his wife and the doctor a cheer
ful goodnight, and fell into a rest
ful sleep. The nurse at the bedside:
felt assured that the patient was on
the road to recovery.
At midnight and in a moment of
time, this was all changed. Mr. Hay
awoke, breathing quick and In a la
bored manner. In feeble tones he
called. The nurse immediately sum
moned Di. Scudder from the adjoin
ing room. Heroic remedies were ap
plied, but they were futile, and Mrs.
Hay was called. She was soon at the
bedside, but the patient's eyeb weie
already dull, and he seemed uncon
scious. Dissolution arrived so rap
idly that the son and daughter had
sot time to reach the room.
Orief and consternation threw the
household Into confusion and it was
two hours befoie Dr. Scudder was
. able to leave the house. He was
driven to the village, where shortly
after 3 o'clock the tidings of Mr.
Hay's death were dispatched to tue
president, to the state department and
to the world at large.
The doctor officially informed the
Associated Press that death was due
to "pulmonary embolism," or a foim
of heart disease.
PRE8IDENT SHOCKED AT
THE UNEXPECTED TIDINGS
Oyster Bay, July 1. President
Roosevelt was shocked and grieved
inexpresiably at the death of secre
tary Hay. When the president was
at Cambridge, Mass., on Wednesday,
he had a consultation with Dr. Jack
son, of Boston, who had been sum
moned to the bedside of Secretary
Hay at tbe incipiency of his illneBS.
Assurances were given by Dr. Jack
son that tbe consulting physicians
agieed with him in the expression
of the opinion that the secretary's
condition was not dangerous. 4
President Roosevelt, bad felt since
Secretary Hay went abroad In tbe
spring that he might never actively
resume bis onerous duties as secre
tary of state, but when Mr. Hay re
turned to Washington, his condition
was so greatly Improved that both he
and tbe piesident hoped that with a
summer rest at Lake Sunapee he
might be able fur a time at least to
direct the state department.
The dfath of the secretary was en
tirely une;ected, and comes as a per
sonal beieavement to the president.
With hiin the president was on terms
of the warmest personal friendship.
Tbe secretary was a personal friend
of Mr, Roosevelt's father, and had
known tbe president from childhood.
It Is reagrded as likely that the
funeral services will be held in Wash
ington, but interment will take place
la Cleveland. Ohio, Mr. Hay's old
L
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THESR ARB THREE "MEMBERS Or THE BODY OUARD OP THE
GOVT3RNOR GENERAL. OF WARSAW. THEY ARE COSSACKS FROM
CIRCASSIA, THE MOST COLD BLOODED AND FIENDISH SOLDIERS
IN THE WORLD. . " ,
tenant Gontarew's chief, Captain Lan-
kow, who was ' also sentenced to
death, applied for leave of absence
a little time aaro. and has denarted
from Warsaw for an Indefinite period.
Following his example, other, police
captains put In urgent demands for
leave.
General Maxlmovlch. the covmnr
general of Poland, dare not show him
self In the public streets, and he
dwells Dracticallv Ja nrlnrvnnr citTior
in one of his Warsaw residences or
Just outside of the city.
He is surrounded constantly by a
body guard of Cticasslon Cossncka
and no one Is permitted to enter the
palace grounds except under escort.
General Maxlmovlch is so fearful of
Approach Where AH Was
home. It is regarded as probable
that no immediate successor will be
named. It is not unlikely that on re
turn of Sucietary Taft from the far
eastern trip, that he may be appoint
ed secretary of state, but nothing defi
nite at this time can be said.
PRESIDENT TELEGRAPHS
SYMPATHY TO MRS. HAY.
Oyster Bay, July 1. President
Roosevelt has sent the following to
Mrs. Hay:
"I cannot believe the dreadful
news. Pray accept our deepest sym
pathy In your terrible bereavement.
I do not know how to express my
soi row.
"THEODORE ROOSEVELT." j
WASHINGTON HEARS WITH 1
PROFOUND SORROW.
Washington, July 1. Notable as a
statesman and diplomat, whose offi
cial activities brought him conspicu
ously before the public for many
years, the news of the death of Sec
retary Hay was received here with
the most profound regret. Although
aware of the delicate condition of
Mr. Hay's health, there was general
expectation that he would rally and
that a long stay In the New Hamp
shire mountains would in a measure
lestore bis health. Mr. Hay was
never of a robust constitution, but by
scrupulous care he was able to keep
In fairly good health. While bis offi
cial duties were congenial to him,
yet because of his somewhat Im
paired physical condition be was re
luctant to remain In the cabinet, and
did so only at the urgent solicitation
of President Roosevelt.
SECRETARY TAFT AND
PARTY GREATLY GRIEVED.
Wheeling, W. Va July 1. Secre
tary Taft and party, who left Wash
ington last night, en route to - San
Francisco, on a Philippine trip, heaid
or Secretary Hay's death at Benwood
Junction early today. Mr. Taft said
the death was a great shock to him,
and other members of the party were
grieved beyond expression. It was be
lieved the death would stop the Phil
ippine trip, but Mr. Taft said he would
be guided by the desires of the presi
dent. BASE BALL
The Las Vegas Blues will
down tonight for a series of
come
three
games with the Browns. It is ru
mored that Charles Daniel bas left the
Blues and gone to Clifton, Ariz. Char-'
lie is an old favorite in Albuquerque,
and if this rumor is true his shining
countenance will be missed by some,
of the Duke City's fair ones, at least.
The line-up of both teams was given,
In The Citizen yesterday. Starr will
do the twirling for the Browns, and
it is said that be will appear to a
much better advantage than two
weeks ago, when the Blues took two
straight from the Browns. Pettus is
coming down from Madrid and will
catch. Matney and Lyons will most,
likely be the battery for the Blues.
Games will be played on Monday
and Tuesday, also. The admission
will be fifty cents.
"
' 1 - '
showing himself In " the Warsaw
streets that he refuses to even go to
church on court days. He Is Just now
at his country seat about for miles
from Warsaw. He left Warsaw at
the -dead of night, tiaveled through
the streets at top speed in a closed
carriage to the railway station, and
boarded immediately a pecia4 train
which steamed away. No one knew
until the next day that the governor
had left Warsaw.
There have been at least thirty as
sassinations of various police and
similar officials In Warsaw within the
past few months, besides numerous
unsuccessful attempts at assassina
tion. Twenty-five policemen are now
receiving medical attendance as n
THE. FUNERAL OF
THOMAS HUGHES
Will Occur Tomorrow After
noon at O'clock "at tWiT
Ave Methodist Church.
BURIAL AT FAIRVItW CEMETERY
Hon. Thomas HugheB, whose death
was -chronicled In these columns yes
terday afternoon, will be buriel In
Falrview cemetery the city of tbe
dead on the mesa tomorrow after
noon, and tbe funeral services will be
conducted at the Lead Avenue Metho
dist church, an edifice be helped,
with bis time, money and pen to
make one of the most sacred and
beautiful Templej of God in this city.
In accordance with tne request of
the dead editor, statesman and poli
tician the burial will be a Masonic
one, with a Knights Templar escort,
and, in pursuance thereof, a casket
emblematic of Masonry will hold his
remains. It Is a full broadcloth
state casket; similar to one In which
President McKlnley was burled, with
canopy raised plate top, carved cor
ners, full exoide and gold handles.
The words "Knight Templar" and
"Thomas Hughes" are engraved on
tbe name plate, with stiver Masonic
emblems on each end.
The Masons will, In accordance to
subjoined notice, proceed from their
hali at 1:30 tomorrow (Sunday) after
noon to the grief-stricken residence
at the corner of Walter street and
Gold avenue, and with the Knights
Templar escort, tbe solemn cortege
will convey the remains to the I-ead
Avenue Methodist church. This
cortege will leave tbe residence at
2:30 p. m. and services will be com
menced at the church at 3 o'clock.
Rev. Thomas Harwood, a plonoer of
this city and for twenty odd years
a friend of the deceased, will be in
charge, assisted by Rev. Wlibur
Flske.
Mrs. A. E. Schwenker, nee Miss
Maude Summers, will sing a solo,
and a quartette, composed of M. C.
Nettleton, Charles Doven, Mrs. E. L.
Washburn and Mrs. 8chwenker, will
sing several appropriate songs.
The pall bearers selected are all
members of Temple lodge, No. 6, A.
F. A. M., as follows: W. H. Greer,
A. E. Walker, John Borradaile. Gov
ernor E. S. Stover, Dr. G. W. Har
rison and N. BL Stevens.
The Knights Templar escort as fol
lows: Dr. E. J. Alger, Ed Lembke,
Thos. Isherwood, Ed. L. Medler, C. F.
Myers, Frank McKee, Dr. J. F.
Pearce. J. J. Sheridan, W. H. Hahn,
W. P. Fox. Dr. L. Chamberlin
will be captain general In command
of tbe escort. Tbe members ot tbe
escort are requested to meet at the
ball at 0 o'clock Sunday morning to
receive Instructions.
Regular Masonic services will be
conducted at tbe grave in Falrview
cemetery-
The floral tributes will be numer
ous, and Undertaker F. H. Strong,
who will have charge of the burial,
has provided an independent vehicle
for these floral esteems from the
friends of the deceased.
John F. Ingram, of Wellington
Kan., who recently purchased the Ab-
ner Johnson ranch in the Luna val
ley In central New Mexico, arrived
In the city last night and will at
once go to the ranch. Mr. Ingram
will devote his time to breeding
standard and thoroughbred stock and
will sell them to the eastern market
and California. The ranch comprises
several thousand acres and bas about
2,500 head of horses on it.
ii
. 1
THIS IS' THE CENTRAL QUARTER OF THE CITY OF WARSAW, POLAND. IT IS CALLED THE "CRACOW FAUBOURG," AND THE JEW
' 1SH QUARTER ABUTS ON IT. IT IS THE PLACE WHERE RIOTING ALWAYS OCCURS WtHEN MOBS BREAK L008B.
result of attacks made oa mem.
The Socialist leaders .javo eutlre
control over their subo,,ynates, and
rioting and violence against private
individuals does not take place. Any
Socialist found 'plundering is immedi
ately shot by bis fellows..,
Since the Socialists have come to
the front during the past few months
crimes have materially decreased in
Warsaw. Only recently the Socialist
Jews made a' concerted attack on the
gambling houses, establishments of
vice, and usure. a In their quarters,
and demolished everything fjund in
the bouses, -driving tre Mnhnoltants
into the streets and forcing many of
them to leave the city. - V
The police fid nothlngto prevent
this outbreak, having had previous
warning that If they stepped in, a
certain number among lhem -would
be killed..' i
The Warsaw employers !! ! private
t-llH-f,si genera-lly ar-'if.y."l'-fTVi
thing tntjy can becretly V tccm. age
the activity of the Socialists.
CHINA WILL
STOP BOYCOTT
After Much Urging Gov
ernment Orders Agi
tation to Cease.
TRACY TO THE PHILIPPINES
Santa Fe Indicted for Con
tempt in Injunc
tion Case.
PACKING HOUSES ARE INDICTED
Washington, July 1. The Chinese
government has taken steps to stop
the untl-Ame. lean agitation and boy
cott against American goods. Minis
ter Rockbill at Pekin today, cabled
the state department, that after re
peated and urgent representation
lroui the American legation, orders
had been issued from the Chinese
toreign offices to all viceroys and
governors in the empire to cease the
anti-Ameiican agitation and the at
tempted boycott against American
goods.
TO SUPREME BENCH
IN THE PHILIPPINES.
Oyster Bay, July 1. Judge James
F. Tracy, of Albany, N. Y.. was today
appointed associate Justice of the su
preme court of the Philippine Islands.
PROCEEDINGS BEGUN
AGAINST SANTA FE.
Kansas City, Mo., July 1. Contemit
proceedings against the Santa Fe
Railway company, charging that cor
poration with being guilty of violat
ing the injunction issued at Kansas
Uity by Judge Phillips. March 24,
11402, restraining tbe road from giving
rebates, was tiled In the United
States district court here today, at
the instigation of Milton D. Puidy, of
Washington, D. C, assistant attorney
general.
EIGHTEEN OFFICIALS
OF PACKING HOUSES.
Chicago, July 1 Indictments were
voted against eighteen persons, four
of whom are oihclaU of the packing
companies, by tbe federad grand Jury
today. This ended the Investigation
which has lasted over three months,
and brought out the testimony of over
100 witnesses.
One indictment of more than sixty
typewritten pages was voted, cover
ing charges including combination in
restiaint of trade, conspiracy t. mo
nopolize trade and receiving anc
granting rebates.
The trials of those under Indict
ment will probably begin in the July
term of the district court. The Null
ed States district attorney's otfice, al
though somewhat reticent, admitted
that the heads of the chief packing
companies are on the Indictment
list.
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THE ROYAL CHATEAU IN WARSAW; , UOMtt OF THW TEiUlOR- STRIjkSN RUSSIAN GOVERNOR.
MORE MUTINY
"'AMONG SEAMEN
Russian Black Sea Fleet
Said to be in
Revolt.
BUT GOVERNOR OF ODESSA
Holds the Situation There
Well in Hand
Just Now.
RUSSIA NAMES ANOTHER DELEGATE
London July 1. A private be'.e
gram has been received hero from
Odessa, saying:
The men of the secocd battleship
have mutinied. I can see no possi
bility of early resumption of work.
The position undoubtedly i critical.
WASHINGTON INFORMATION
CONFIRMS THE REPORT
Washington, July 1. The Russian
Rlack Sea fleet Is reported to bave
mutinied. American Consul Heenan
at Odessa has cabled the state de
partment as follows: "Fleet reported
in mutiny; two battleships here, Po
teroklne and another."
GOVERNOR OF ODESSA
MASTER OF SITUATION
Paris, July 1. A dispatch to Havas'
agency from Odessa confirms the pre
vious report to the effect that the
crew of the Knlas Potemklne have
been transferred to other verse's of
tbe Black Sea fleet. The dispatch
adds that the governor of Odessa Is
master of the situation.
WAITING TO HEAR OF
JAPANESE ACTION
St. Peterurg. July 1. M. Mura
vletf, Russian ambassador at Rome,
will le chief of the Russia delega
tion at the peace conference in Au
gust. His name has been forwarded
to Washington, but no further Rus
sian representatives will be named
until the size of Japan's delegation li
ascertained.
FAMOUS CORRESPONDENT
TO SPEND SUNDAY HERE
William E. Curtis, corespondent of
tbe Chicago Record-Hm aid and the
man who has signed bis name to
more articles than any other writer
in the country, is scheduled to arrive
in Albuquerque tonight and will spend
Sunday viewing the nights of the
city. He is traveling with W. H.
Simpson ad vei Using agent of the
Santa Ke railroad, and is on bis way
to San Francisco, where he will Join
Secretary of War Taft and partyj
who will sail on July 4th for the Phil
ippines.
v t r
'
INTERVIEW WITH
COL H. A. JASTRO
Facts as to Cost and Operation of a Modern and
up to Date Water System
at This Time.
A representative of The Citizen
called last evening upon H. A. Jastro,
at the Alvaiado, -where he Is spend
ing a fow days, and had a pleasant
talk with him concerning the Bakers
field water system, which is owned
by a company that Mr. Jastro repre
sents. Tbe reporter leained from
Mr. Jastro that In California a fran
chise Is not required for a water
works system. Any man can put In
a plant who may wish to do so, pro
vided be leave tbe streets In as
good condition as he found them.
There was in Bakersfield an an
tiquated Holly system plant line, but
this did not dissuade Mr. Jastro fiom
putting in an up-to-date plant. He
explained to The Citizen man that the
iioily system first pumps tbe water
into a reservoir, whence It is dis
tributed through the plant by the
force of gravity. In other words, the
water is first pumped up to some
high position, tbe cost ot pumping In
creasing with every foot of elevation,
In orde. that It may run down again.
The modern system consists in pump
ing the water directly from the wells
Into the mains, thus avoiding unnec
essary expense In lifting the water;
also avoiding tbe possibilities of con
tamination, which are inseparable
from an open reservoir; and further
more, avoiding the heating of the
water, which the reset voir invaria
bly and necessarily produces.
While talking upon this last point,
C. P. Lupton, the new trainmaster at
Winslow, but a former resident of
Bakersfield, came up and confirmed
the statement that the water at
Bakersfield Is deliciously pure and as
cold as ice water.
Mr. Jastro also stated that Bakers
field Is situated in tbe valley of the
Ke:n river, much as Albuquerque is
situated in tbe valley of tbe Rio
Grande; that the water plant Includes
eight wells in different parts of the
town, which vary in depth from fifty
to eighty-five feet. Each well la pro
vided with a pump, and electricity is
the power employed, while two men
are sufficient to look after twelva
such welln. I
"In Bakersfield," said Mr. JaBtro,
4tKAA Id rn ri.i:t rllnt nut limn tha'
use of water for Irrigation purposes,
except that an open hose cannot be
used. But the people are encour
aged to use all the. water they can
day and night, the. rate being one
cent per frout foot per month, for the
more the city U beautified the more
we are benefited."
When asked what he thought such
a plant could be established for In
Albuoueraue. he rvtilled that tha nut
'should not exceed between $75,000
- r-s
n
r
T
and $100,000, the latter amount mak
ing ample pi o vision for tutor
growth. .
EX-MAYOR FAVORS
MUNICIPAL OWNERSHIP
A representative of The Citlaea
called on ex-Mayor O.. N. Matron at
his office thia morning' and requested
him to give his views on the water
question. Mr. Marion talked as fol
lows: "The question of municipal owner
ship of the water works and thai
control and distribution ot this most
important public utility bas been aa
attractive one ever since I have bad
to do with public affairs. This ques
tion was discussed considerably dur
ing the time I was mayor of tbe city
and several conferences were bad
with the late A. A. Grant, telatlve to
the taking over of the water plaai
by the city, but we never got very lav
In tbe matter."
"What, In your opinion, Mr. Mar
ron, is the sentiment of this com
munity, as to municipal ownersnip ot
its water works?" asked The Citlxaa
representative. ,
"I bave investigated this matter
quite thoroughly," answeied Mr. M'ar
ron, "and have talked with a great
number of people on the subject, and
In my opinion the sentiment la over
whelmingly In favor of the city own
lug and controlling the water works.
Aud why should this not be sol It
has been tried in a great number ot
cities and with success. Thia com
munity U aa intelligent and publie
sentiment Is as good as can be found
In any oilier community of like alx
anywhere, and I am not one ot thoae
who fear tbe people having their own
way. even to the control, operatic
ami owue.ship or the public utilities.
"Is there auy way, in your opinion,
Mr. Marron, whereby the city caa
put Into practical operation the muni
cipal control aud owuership of ita
water supply and thus yield presently
to the sentiment or which, you.
peakf
"1 see no Insuperable barrier to
tals," replied the gentleman. "My
Idea is that when there is anything
pi easing to be done la to go at it and
do it. This question cau be settled
uow aud tor all time as well as at
some vague future date. It Is my
opinion that the present water plant
can be taken over by the city. Th
Act of Congress hs accepted from
the prohibition of Incurring but a
certain amount of Indebtedness by
municipalities thia very thing which.
Z , T J(l" "'J"m
r
(Continued on Dags four.)

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