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Albuquerque evening citizen. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1905-1907, March 05, 1906, Image 1

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VOLUME 20 AL1UJQUERQUK, NEW .MEXICO. MONDAY KVKN1XO. MAKClI 5. 11)00. XUMUKK GO
ALBUQUERQUE
WELL PLEASED
iPostmaster Hopkins Has
Been Nominated For
Another Term
ALASKA GIVEN A DELEGATE
Two Hundred Thousand Dol
lars for Coinage of
Nickels and Dimes.
SIR NICHOLAS IS TH SMOKER
Washington, D. C, March 6. The
president today sent the following
nominations for postmasters to the
senate: R. W. Hopkins, Albuquerque,
N. M.; Lola Woand, Fort Sam Hous
ton, Texas, and F. , Leahy, Rodgers,
Texas.
I The Citizen congratulates Mr. Hop
kins that in his case the expected and
very generally desired has conie to
pass. If faithful and acceptable dis-
charge of official duties during one
term of office Is ground for reappoint
ment, Mr. Hopkins certainly had that
ground in the very fullest seiise ol
ne terra.)
SENATE.
Washington, D. C, March 5. At 3
oclock the statehood hill una taken
up and read. Senatcr Nelson sioke
in its favor and Senator 'Xing' will
speak on the same side tomorrow.
When the senate convened today
Culberson, of Texas, reported favora
l)ly from the committee on judiciary
the bill dividing the western Jurisdfc
tlon of Texas and creating a new lls
irlct. The bill passed.
HOUSE.
Washington, D. C, March 5. The
nouse today passed the senate bill
providing for a delegate in congress
inira AiasKa.
The house Isn naasp.l 1,111 I
ine from Jno.nnn tr Jtofl mui iTio
amount for the purchase of metals to
Vie coined Into pennies and nkels.
and providing that these coins shall
lie made in uenver, San Francisco
New Orleans and Philadelphia mints
instead or ncw.'excluslvely la the Phil
adelphia mint.
By unanimous consent today the
nouse authorized printing in the con
,ressional record the nrtrlrosa of fle
D. Perkins at the funeral of thw late
-speaker, David . B.. Henderson. ' The
memorial was presented by Lacey, ol
Iowa, 'who characterized it as beauti
ful and historical in character.
RATHER LARGE SIZED
PURE IMPORTED CIGAR.
Washington, D. C, March 5. Rep
resentative Longworih, of Ohio, re
Turned to duty in the house today. He
brought with him and presented to
Speaker Cannon a Havana cigar, at
least fourteen inches long, a product
' f Havana.
AMERICAN SOLDIERS ARE
PLEASED WITH PROSPECTS
Chicago, March 5. The war lver
has broken out at Fort Sheridan.
Practically all of the 1,200 enlisted
men there have a touch of infection.
They are stirred by the reports of a
possible clash with China and arc
ready to go to the Orient and win
martial honors. The fact that appeals
to the soldiers and has aroused their
hopes of some change from the rou
tine of post life, is that recently the
War Department demanded a com
plete detailed report of the condition
of the men mid the equipment at Fort
Sheridan. All are fully equipped and
nearly every organization has been
recruited up to Us full quota.
ANOTHER LAKE SUPERIOR
COPPER MINE OPENED.
Calumet, Mich., March 5. Within
a few days another mine will be added
la the list of producing copper proper
ties In the Lake Superior copper dis
trict. It Is expected that the Victoria
miue in Ontonagon county, will start
treating Its rock In its new stamp
mill within a few days. The Vic
toria's mill is 50;150 feet, ground
dimensions, and contains one head
with a dally capacity of 250 Ions ol
rock. A railroad connecs the. mill
with the mine, which is 4.8un feet dis
tant, and as the grade Is from C to 12
per cent the loaded rock cars will
draw the empties up the greater part
f the way back to the mine, A sta
tionury engine is at the upper end ol
ihe road and will facilitate the work
TWO HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT
NAVAL ACADEMY VACANCIES.
Washington. D. C. March 5. After
ibis date theiv are fifty-three vacan
cies in the naval academy to be filled
by United States senators and 193
ly representatives and the members
of both, houses, who have such vacan
cies to fill have been notified ti Eend
in their nominations. The number
of vacancies is nearly equally dis
tributed ovtr the different sections
of the country.
BURGLARS RANSACK
PALLADINO RESIDENCE
HOUSE WAS RUMMAGED FROM
CELLAR TO GARRET WHILE IN
MATES SLEPT PEACEFULLY ON
Hurglurs broke into the residence of
O. Palladino. the contractor, residing
it 331 North Fourth street, last night.
The house was rummaged from cellar
to garret, desks were broken open
mid drawers gone through, while the
family slept, but nothing is missing
but n cheap revolver. The culprits
gained entrance through the front
door and passed out through the rear
door. They did much damage by
wrecking furt.iture. The rVbhery wai
not discovered until this morning.
RICE FAMINE
680,000 NOW EAT S TEA W
President's Appeal for Relief by
America is Based Upon Har
rowing ReportGranaries
Denuded b y Ruined Crops.
Washington, 1). C, March 5. Upon
the theory that "nations, like men,
should stand ever ready to aid each
other." President Roosevelt has writ
ttn a general appeal for relief to the
famine sufferers in Japan and has rec
ommended that contributions be sent
to the American National Red Cross
society, which Mill forward them to
the Japanese Red Cross.
The president has been stirred bv a
story cf starvation that people in this
land of plenty, can scarcely realize
Three of the northern provinces of
the valiant Island kingdom, with a
population of nearly 3,000,000 people,
are facing the worst famine since the
terrible one of 1840. Rice is the prin
cipal diet of the Japanese people and
the crop in the three districts hits
failed woefully.
Japanese government, reports says
Henry B. Miller, consul general of
Yokahama, tells only part of the terri
ble condition of tho people. He has
sent home an estimate that "over 650,
000 people are in extreme distress,
with no possibility of saving life with
out aid. Thousands of people are lin
ing cn roots, acorns, leaves of straw
mixed with small quantities of rice
and flour. What, makes the famine
doubly hard to bear is that the silk
LATE ECHOES OF
RECENT STORMS
Report Is Confirmed. That
French Establishment in
Oceania Devastated.
WRECK ON CAROLINA COAST
Block of Ice From Gulf of Finland
Carries Hundred and Fifty
Live Men.
Paris, March 5. Minister of Col
onies Clenientel received a cable con
firming the press reports that the
French establishment in Oceania was
devasted by a cyclone and tidal wave
February 7 and 8. Tahiti was par
ticularly affected. Three hundred and
twenty-seven houses at Papette were
destroyed. The two relief ships sent
to the scene of the disaster from
Tuarmotu Islands have not returned.
The governor of the colony has asked
for aid.
LINE STEAMER STRANDED
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
Wilmington, N. C, March C The
line - steamer Navahoe Is ashore on
the shoals off the Cape Fear bar in
ten feet of water. She is badly listed
and her position is considered danger
ous in case of a strong west wind
The cargo is being lightered and an
attempt to float will be made this
afternoon.
ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY
CLING TO ICE FOR LIFE
Cronstadt, March.",. A block of ice
from the Gulf of Finland with about
luo fishermen on it has been driven
ashore here.
NORWAY STORM HAS
COST FIFTY LIVES
Tronjih, Norway. March 5. lie
sides eleven fishing boats repotted
missing, as result of the recent storm,
five others are unaccounted for. The
total loss of lives is estimated at
fifty.
FOOD SHOW TAKNG
PLACE IN BROOKLYN
Hrooklyn. N. Y.. March 5. The
third food show under the auspices ol
the Prooklvn Association cf Retail
Groc-rs will open tonighi at the Cler
mont Avenue Kink. It U expected that
ii will surpass all previous shows oi
lhai kind tvtr held liere. l ast year
the attendance during the three weeks
or the exhibition was 131.431. not
wlihs aiiding the highly unfavorable
weather. It U expected that the at
tendance will be far greater As In
former years coupons will be distrib
u'ed by the retail grocers cf Brooklyn,
which will entitle their patrons to
admission i the show in the after
noons at ten cents.
CONSUL GENERAL MILLER.
crop was only half the average out
put, thus bringing additional famine.
The three provinces affected, show
this appalling condition:
In Miyagi province, with a popula
tion of 8!9.279, and a 12 per cent crop
In 1905, 250.000 people are starving.
In Fukushlma province, population,
1.174,024. with 25 per cent crop in
1905. 300.000 are starving.
In Iwate province, with a popula
tion of 748.254, and a 33 per cent crop
in 1905, 100,000 are starving.
The value of an average crop in the
three provinces totals $18,630,936. but
the loss on the present crop Is es
timated at $14,150,787, or $5 per per
son. Extremes In temperature and an un
usual excess of raina caused the fail
ure of the rice crop. Every effort to
save the crop and avert disaster was
unavailing. The Japanese government
crop bulletins tell the story as geo
graphically us anything. In the case
of Fugushima province the bulletins
were:
Crop
Date. Condition.
August 23 75 per cent
September 25 62 per cent
Octolier 5 38 per cent
October 1G 32 per cent
October 24 29 per cent
November 10 25 per cent
Famine alarms began with the bulle
tin Issued on October 5.
Behind these bare flugres was a
propitious June In tne first hair, se
vere rains In the last half and twenty-
seven days of rain In August, wlt'n
only one of the three kinds of rice
blossoming. There was Improved
weather in September, but cold nights
followed and even the partial crop
was marly destroyed.
A Mockery of Food.
In the desperate resort to devour
ing straws, roots and acorns food
the world over for cattle and hogs
the Japanese of the future provinces
are indeed undergoing a supreme or
deal. Samples of the food shown to
the foreign residents' relief commit
tee smelted sour, and the mess was
nasty and fcretn and altogether ro-4
pugnant. The Japanese government
has made elaborate tests of these
foods to determine how much nour
ishment they contain, and to warn
the people agahist poisonous lngredi
ents.
ITEMS FROM THE
FIELD OF LABOR
President Gompers Has Called
Meeting of His Execu
tive Council
PROBABLY ON COAL STRIKE
Trial of Western Miner Officials
Grows More Sensational
Day by Day.
Washington, March ',. President
Gompers of the Federation of Labor
called a meeting of the executive
council here for March 19. Matters to
be discussed have not been disclosed
but the fact that President Mitchell of
the Mine Workers, who is a memler
of the council, will bo present, lends
color to the belief thai, the coal sit
uation will be considered.
CHARGES AGAINST THE
INNER CIRCLE INCREASE
Portland, Ore.. March 5. The'Ore
gonian prints today a special from
Hoise, Ma., which states in substance
that the 'inner circle" of the West
ern Federation of Minem did not
confine Itself to murder of non-union
miners and slate officials, but that the
toois who committed these crimes
were themselves victims of the "in
ner circle." Orchard was one of the
tools marked lor destruction and the
correspondent says that the confes
sion of Steve Adams is said to show
that Orchard had l.een Miadowed for
some time. 'J'hc correspondent states
that through a resident of Hoise still
another victim of disturbances con
nected with th Colorado mining trou
ble, has been added to the list. This
is Wesley Smith, boss miner, who
disappeared from Tellmlde in l'Ji2.
CONFERENCE FOR REFORM
PRIMARY ELECTION LAWS.
New York, March a. Tile second
national conference for the n f firm ot
the primary ami election laws will
open here today and will remain in
session iliree days. The Kiibjec s for
discussion will l,e primary laws, elec
l L ii laws, w iili special ri ference to
the form c,f the ballots and corrupt
pracice acts as now In force In the
various siales, together with pro
posed modifications.
Kepreseiitalives ol nettny every
ular ai'd independent political
civic organisation thr ushout
I'nited Slater, main- members o,'
r g
and the
con-
gresj and inryors if large cities
are
hen- to attend the ctnilerence and it
Is exiiec ed that the proceedings of
t.ie conference wi'l In
teresting. Among the
will addrens the c- infi r
men of w ide experit n
J.oli' ic!.
unusually In-
opeakers who
m-e are many
in mailers
IN JAPAN
I- , ' v f it '
A RICE FIELD IN THE
J i i i 4 t i 1 1 K 1 i II .
, WEIRD FAMINE FOODS.
Acorn cakes are becoming a luxury because the supply of
acorns is almost exhausted. To remove bitterness, the acorns are
dried and pulverized. The flour la then boiled in a solution of pot
assium carbonate for half an hour and the residue dried. To this
Is added wo quarts of foreign rice and one quart cf flour, and
when possible a quart of native rice. The whole Is then pounded
Into a cake, which is eaten with soy t sauce) or after being rolled
In bean flour.
Shredded Straw.
Straw Cakes Straw, seven ptrts; cheap flour, 1 parts, water,
16 quarts; lime, one-quarter of a pound; potassium bicarbonate,
one-half pound.'
The straw is cut very fine and boiled In the water about
hours. The roots and chaff are skimmed off and discarded. The
water is strained through the lime, and -the potassium bicarbonate
and more straw added. The balled straw is then washed with fresh
w ater and drained and then mixed with cheap flour. Cakes are form
ed and allowed to dry. These cakes are eaten or boiled In soup.
Other varieties ol fo.tds vary from combinations of foreign rice
with grass or chrysanthemum leaves to guels made of bad flour,
with radishes and seaweed. The roo.s of the wisteria are also
eaten. .
i i i V
WEST BOUND NO. 1
A NumbefWflative Laborers; With Express Mes
senger Summers, More or Less Seriously In
juredDitched Train Returned to City.
its
Special to The Evening Citizen,
Gallup, N. M., March 5. The Chicagc-Los Ange'e westbound
train No, 1 was wrecked at 12:30 o'clock this morning near Toltec,
fifty miles east. of Gallup. The engine and tank jumped the track
while the train was going at high speed. The express car, baggage
car, coach and one tourist sleeper followed the tank into the ditch.
No fatalities are repor.ed. A number of trains are tied up here.
The blockade will open this afternoon. All derailed cars were over
turned except the day coach. Express Messenger Summers was
badly bruised and a number of native laborers were cut and bruis
ed. Traffic was delayed twelve hours.
A A 9. 9 9 9 9. 9. 9 9 9. 9 9
The News Here.
Santa Fe Los Angeles train No. 1,
wiileh left Albuquerqus at 8:15 o'clock
last evening, was wrecked at Toltec
a small sta'ion between Grants and
Illuewater, lu2 miles west of here.
The accident occurred at 12:30
o'clock last night, but owing to Tol
lec being five miles from Grants, the
nearest telegraph station, the news
did net reach the city until 3 o'clock
this morning.
On leaving here last night No. 1
carried a baggage car. one express
car, a smoker, a chair car, three tour
it sleepers, one standard sleeper and
the private car of Mrs. Paul Morton,
who was en route to California with
a party of friends. At Isleta, it is un
dersiood. No. 1 picked up a car of na
tive laborers, and that a largti num
ber cf these were. Injured.
The rf al extent of the dead, (should
there be anvl. and Initired list could i
not be learned at 3 o'clock, owing to '' 'jecome evident. Mr. Summers as
the wires being under the exclusive j al,;' wa!k lro1" ,he far ,lle
use of Santa Fe train service. , i bulance. None of the natives are
The train crew consisted of Con-! considered fat a sly iujurid, no bones
ductor J. ic. Davern. of 205 South!1"111- 'Token.
Arno street, this city; Engineer1
George Calvert, of t',11 South High
street, this city, and Fireman Braun,
cr tne Arlington rooming house, on
South Second street, this city.
Kxpress Messengi r 1 A. Summers,
of fioi West Roma avenue, ibis city.
Is reported to be a tnoii the seriously
injured.
Relief Train Delayed.
A relief train bearing the wrecK
lng crew and donors I- ft this city at
ti o'clock tills l.:::rii!lL'. Thr em.hin
broke down at Islet a and the train
was delajei until another etiginoi
could lJ( Hccured from the local shops. I
This I rain bearing tin- injured, Is ex-1
"peeled to reach this ciiy at 4 o'clock;
this afternoon. Tiini ran of tlie'
equipment not disable-! in the wreck
including the car of Mrs. Paul Mor
ton. will be returned i the city ibis
evening.
Track in Bad Condition,
Where the wreck occurred the rail-
flr l . . . . . . 1 .
i inverses un- in johe river vai i
ley, and cwing to tne b avy precipita
tlon of the winter. .!: roadbed is!
con.-idered In verv had condition. The!
engine tender of -rai-i No. 8 U ft the!
track at aliout t hi- .-:i:r..' nlaee I it
nipht. but without mt: 'is results.
Treffie Delayed T
clve Hours,
local Santa Fe
it a "shoo-fly"
ind the w reck
'II. The train
- morning car
aggage, seveu
whicii were to
poses at this
ll Was KlMtCl.u' .1- . I.W'Ul U.n L-..I
.f!lct
at noon today
Uld be completed a
by t o'clock this an. r:
which l,.ft the citv Hi
ried as a part of its I
teen rails and uiio
ue used lor
point.
repair
FAMINE DISTRICT.
M'tlOtl'ttttttlTI
- " t t t f
PASSENGER
TRAIN DITCHED AT TOLTEC
a .
9 9. 9. 9 9
9 9 9 9. 9. 9 lit!
Train No. 7 ot last night is Uing
held at the local station, as Is train
No. 3, the limited. No. 2 was report
ed indefinitely late at noon. Train
N:t. 10 from the south, was held at
the local station this morning for
northbound passengers, leaving on tlie
schedule of No.
SERIOUSNESS OF WRECK
VASTLY EXAGGERATED.
The reli'-f train reached the city at
2.4.") o'clock this afternoon. In charge
of Conductor Tavern of the ill gated
No. 1. On board wer all the passen
gers and tae Injured, the latter con
sisting or nine natives, who are
under contract to work for the Holmes
Supply company, and Kxpress Mes
senger .1. A. Summers. Mr. Summers
injuries consist of bruises, and are
not considered serious, unless he re
ceived iniernal injuries, that have not
H"i"""'l"iy on reaching the city,
the cars bearing the wounded were
! Ik"'u, :1
tlie stockade beyond the
view of tie1 large crowd of curious
P o le and friends who met the train.
.Many who had friends and relatives
aboard t::' wrecked train gave audi
ble vent to their feelings f relief on
l'Uiiiiim ;ke uu!h as to the lesult,
:t the tii.-t report that were widely
ciiculaid were to the effect that five
persons were killed, including the en
gineer and fireman, and other member-
ot ihe train crew, and that many
Were injured. Tile su.-per.se caused
by hoi- ot news, wiili i tic- flagrant re-1
por-s abioad. hail caused noic.i anx I
ieiy I
Conductor Talks. I
Co
Davtrn s-as thai :it- caii-
for til" wp ck. The train !
in ;
w a -iiiie
i in-i-o
r
aeeonu;
t raveling
ii at) ut twenty-live
-, an I;1
t:a );.
'i:r, when tlie tender iff i
Ti:e baagage and express
ud two emetics followed, but
IVH!.l!!:e:I Ul'l iuh'. A lll'SSi llg'T wa.1
inline, lia-ely dispatched to Grants.!
v.::::i - t'e miles back the tiack j
At tin- t::ne tile relief train, which
I
of an elirtine and raboose. j
indue " Murphy. I'd; the i
i, n. I
see'
it
ie- wnck. the w reckiii ; crew
lit : pmgress tow ard clear
a I No attempt had ut that
had n:a I.
inn the r
tilll" be.-
nro'ind
Con. lie -i
s atell:. :l
Ira tlie v.i
t. n.n.'e :o build a "h!u -fly"
i. .i;t material was at hand,
ir 1 u rn w ould make no
a- ! how long he thought
.nil be blocked,
i.iireil were moved to thi!
I.u.-piia!. under the care of
The
Sama I
(Continued on pagt four)
LABOR LEADER
KILLS HIMSELF
Member of Father Ga
pon's Labor Organiza
tion Proves Innocence
CHURCH RECEIVES PRINCESS
Jewish Congress Authorized
by Russian Government
Meets in St. Petersburg.
ELECTION OF RUSSIAN ASSEMBLY
S'. Petersburg, Marrh u. The ac
cused member of Father Gapon's la-
or organization, who committed sui
cide yesterday while ths scandal In
volving charges of accepting money
from the government was being in
vestigated, was named Scacff. He en-
Joyed a high standing among his fel
low workmen who are depressed be
cause of the scandal.
It has now developed that Father
Gapon himself was present at yester
days meeting when Schoff killed him
self. Father Gregrorlo Petroff charg
ed Schoff with obtaining $2,500 from
rather Gapon, and with having ac
companled a memlier cf the secret po.
uce in nia search Tor Malushensky, a
councellor and press agent of the
Father Gapon movement, who fled
with funds belonging to the organiza
tion. During the meeting Schoff made an
Impassioned speech, declaring that he
could not support the Infamy involv
ed In the charge that the organiza
tion had been In league with the gov
ernment nor the obliquity heaped on
himself, as both he and the orgeniza
tlon were Innocent. He then called
upon Father Gapon to declare in the
presence of his fellows whether he,
iscuoiT), had received a cent from
the government. Gapon arose and ex
onerated Schoff, whereupon the lat
ter arose and said: "I will now give
you u supreme proof of my honesty
and drawing a revolver, he blew out
his brains.
FUTURE WIFE OF SPANISH
KING RECEIVED IN CHURCH.
Paris, March 6. Princess Ena, ot
Hattenberg,' the future wife of King
Alfonso, of" Spain, will be received
Into the Itom-an Catholic church on
Wednesday at San Sebastian, Sprain.
King Edward will accompany the
princess from Biarritz to San Sebas
tian. GOVERNMENT AUTHORIZES
MEETING OF THE JEWS.
St. Petersburg, March 5. The Jew
ish congress, authorized by the gov
ernment, met here today. The at
tendance is very large and. representa
tives from all parts of the empire are
present. Many of the most distin
guished Jews of the country are In
attendance. The situation will be
thoroughly discussed during the ses
sion of the congrtss and an attempt
will bo made to formulate s;me plan
for Improving the condition of the
Jews In all parts of the empire. No
definite plan has so far been sug
gested. RUSSIAN ASSEMBLY IS
TO BE ELECTED SOON.
St. Petersburg. March 5. The im
perial ukase today orders elections to
the national assembly to begin April
8, in twenty-eight provinces of cen
tral Russia; on April 27 In sixteen
other provinces of central Russia and
and Don region; and in two other
provinces on May 3.
FAMOUS HYDE CASE WILL
BE HEARD IN WASHINGTON
ATTORNEY CHILDERS GOES TO
WASHINGTON TO ARGUE CASE
BEFORE SUPREME COURT.
W. U. Chllders, the attorney, left
Saturday night for Washington, U C,
where he goes to represent the K. J.
McLean company in a suit appealed
to the supreme court of tho United
States. T. IS. Catron of Santa Fe, .Is
associated with Mr. Chllders on the
McLean .side of the ease, Attorney
Charles Spiess of Iah Vegas repre
senting the Territorial Cattle Sani
tary Hoard, In reality the defendants.
The caso is styled the Territory
of New Mexico, ex rel. K. J. McLean
& Co., vs. the Iienver At Rio Grande
Railroad company, ami is known
throughout the territory us the hide"
case.
Tho cause of action is the con
stitutionality of the 10 cent inspec
tion tax on hides shipped out of tlie
territory. Some time aito, the K. J
McLean company delivered to the
Denver & Rio Grande railroad, a
bundle of hides upon which this tax
had not been paid. The railroad com
pany refused to transport the hides
and a damage anil was im lulled
against them by the McLean com
pany. The lower courts and terri
torial supreme court held that tho
law was constitutional as passed by
the last legislative assembly, where
upon the .Mi-Lean company appealed
to the supreme Court of ihe Foiled
Stales.
HIGHLANDERS BASEBALL
TEAM STARTS SOUTH
New York. March f. The Highland
ers, headed by Clark Griffith, started
troin here shortly before 1 o'clock this
itftt riu-oii f r ihe south. They are
now on their way to Itirmingham,
Ala., win-re their first Mop wiU be
made. Among the players who start
ed from here today are Jai k Chesbro,
Al Orth, Willie Keeler, Jim .McGuire.
W'al ir Clarkson, Conroy, Jimmy
Williams. Pitcher Leroy, Tnomas i:n,.
erfeld, Kleinow, Newton. Several of
the tilier players arc now on their
way from the wet and will join the
lest of the team in Rirmingham.
WITH CAPTAINS
OF INDUSTRY
Standard Oil Sparring for
Time in Fight With
Missouri
MORGAN TO SEE THE KING
McCurdy Promised Jerome
to Return Whenever He
May be Wanted.
CREEm IS TRIED FOR GRAFTING
New York, March 5. The decision
on the question whether H. H. Jiogera
shall be compelled to answer the
questions asked him in the Missouri
oil hearing, and which he had re
fused to answer, has been postponed!
until March 2tlh. Justice Gilder
Bleeve, who heard the argument, di
rected adjournment, In order to await
final decision in the Missouri courts,
relative to a similar case.
During the argument for an ad-
Journment, V. V. Rowe, counsel for
Rogers, said: "I wish to tell the
court, as the mouthpiece of Rogers,
that 1 have the final decision of the
Missouri court, which is against Rog
ers, and will answer questions as to
stock transfers without - order from
the court."
Henry AVollman, who repeesented
the Btate of Missouri for Attorney
General Hadley, objected to the ad
journment, saying that it was an ef
fort of the Standard Oil people to
delay the case. "If Rowe will say, as
matter of record for this court," said
Wollman, "that Rogers will answer
on the 23rd of March, I am satisfied,
but we don't want .to agree to having
this hearing adjourned so as to give
them time to appeal to the United
States supreme court."
March 23rd is the date for resump
tion of the Standard Oil hearing be
fore Commissioner Sanborn. Rowe
repeated his previous statement on
the behalf of Rogers, and the bearing
was adjourned before Judge Glider
sleeve until March 16th.
J. PIERPdNT MORGAN
HAS REACHED ROME.
Rome, March 0. J. Pierpont Mor
gan arrived here yesterday, suffering
from a slight cold, but his general
health is good. He will be- received
by the king shortly.
McCURDY'S NEED OF REST
BECAUSE OF HIS TRIP.
New York, March f. It appears
from the Herald that Richard A. Mc
Curdy, former president of the. Mu
tual Life Insurance company, before
sailing for Paris, last Wednesday, en
tered Into a written understanding
with District Attorney Jerome to re
turn to this country at any time his
presence may be desired, and to re
turn by September 1st. in any event.
This Is taken to confirm the report
that tho district attorney is prepar
ing certain life insurance matters for
the grand jury. Also, tho Herald
says that Jerome was shown a cer
tificate from McCurdy's physician
representing the former president in
a physical condition demanding ab
solute rest and removal from business
cares. ,
JUSTICE GOULD REFUSED
TO FIND FOR DEFENSE.
Washington, I .C, March 6. Jus
tice Gould, In the criminal court to
day overruled the motion made by
counsel ' In the case of George A.
Green of Ulnghampton, N. Y., on trial
for conspiracy In connection with tho
sale or supplies to the postofflce de
partment, to instruct the Jury to ac
quit the defendant; and the defense
proceeded with the submission of its
caBe. In reply to a question from
the court, the counsel for the de
fense suggested that they might get
through with their testimony today.
SENATOR CLARKE KEEPS
LARGE TRACT OF LAND.
Washington, 1. C. March 5. Uni
ted Btates Senator Clark of Montana
today won the case ugainst him In
the supreme court of the I'uited
States, in which the government
sought to havo cancelled patents to
11.400 acres of public lands In Mon
tana, which, it is alleged, he had
fraudulently secured. The opinion In
ihe case was delivered by Justice
Holmes, und upheld the decision of
the court of appeals for the ninth
circuit. Justices Harlan and Rrown
dissented.
AUTOMOBILE SHOW
HELD IN BUFFALO.
Huffalo. N. Y.. March 5. The' fourth
.annual auomoiiiie snow of Iluffalo
opens at the C;nventlon hall today,
and, Judging from the large number
of entries, the large number of man
ufacturing concerns represented, and
the completeness of the arrangements
it promises lo be by far the most In
teresting and successful automobile
show ever held In this city. The ar
langemiuts are nearly complet . This
afternoon a private view will be given
the exhibliors und representatives of
the press and the format opening will
take nlace this evening, when the
entire hall will be a blaze of electric
llglUH. Many of tae foreign machines,
which have been exhibited - in New
York and other latg..- cities In the
east ure on exhibition here and will
attract considerable a tetition.
NOTED MURDER TRIAL
BEGINS IN CHICAGO
Chicago. III.. March 5. The trial or
Richard G. Ivens, the slayer of Mrs.
ltessle Hollister, was begun today be
fore Judge Hen M. Smith of the crim
inal courts. Attorney I. W. Foltz. a
friend cf Lie Ivens family, Is acting
as defendant s counsel, while Attorney
Moritx Rosenthal, a personal friend
of the Hollister family. Is assisting
tlie state. It Is expected that the
trial will las- several weeks. A great
deal of testimony will bo introduced
by both sides.

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