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Albuquerque evening citizen. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1905-1907, August 07, 1906, Image 1

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ALHUQUEKQUE, NEW MEXICO. TUESDAY EVENING. AUGUST 7. 11)00.
VOLUME 20
NUMBER 190
ft
JOINT STATE
LEAGUE HAS
NOW BEGUN
Its Fight For Statehood Which
Will Be Pushed to
Finish.
STRENGTH DEVELOPED AT
PHOENIX SURPRISED THE
Whole Country-The Non Partisan
League Was Formed and
Is In the Field.
Tucson, Ariz., Aug. 7. The farce
of a Joint meeting of the central
committees of the democratic and re
publican parties, came off In Phoenix,
Saturday, as had been arranged, and
the cut and dried program was put
through. This was done In the dem
ocratic central committees at once
and without trouble. in fact, the
democratic proceedings were for all
the world like a school boy rehearsing
a part which had been drilled Into
him. The reason for this was that
the members of the democratic com
mittee who favored statehood had
been informed that they would not be
permitted to occupy their seats. So
they did not attend, and the copper
colored and railway tarred delegates
had it ail their own way. However,
It was developed that fully 25 per
cent of the democratic central com
nutlee favor joint statehood. The
democrats appointed a committee of
three to act with a similar commit
tee appointed by the republican com
mittee, to conduct the fight against
statehood. When they had done this
and called the democratic territorial
convention to meet in Bisbee, Sep
tember ti, there was nothing more for
them to do, and they adjourned. When
they learned that the antl-Jointure
resolution offered by 'the republicans
had met with unexpected opposition,
and passed only by a vote of 35 to
15, the democrats evidently became
alarmed and passed no resolution on
.the subject.
The' republican central committee
had not such smooth sailing, for not
withstanding Governor Kibbey, like E.
J3. Elllnwood, had labored inriiistrious
iy to get proxies before his purpose
was understood, and had so well sue
ceeded that his secretary held fifteen
proxies, yet it was soon demonstrated
that the committee stood 18 for state
hood to 32 against It.
Among the statehood republicans
were such men as Col. Alien T. Bird
of Nogales, Frank Dysant of Graham,
O. M. Gaddis of Mojave, Thomas Mal
loy of Yuma, Capt. John T. Hogue of
St. Johns, Hon. J. L. Hubbell of Gan
ado, and men of that character and
standing sufficient to raise the number
to eighteen. These proved a thorn In
the flesh of the antis during the whole
day. The committee refused to en
dors Hoosevelt, appointed a commit
tee of three to act with the democrats,
in the fight for statehood, selected
Bisbee as the place and September (i
as the time for holding the republican
(territorial convention, agreed to a di
vision of candidates for the state
hood convention, with the democrats,
and then adjourned, after a whole clay
of hard and disagreeable labor on the
part of the majority, which majority
was largely composed of proxies.
The chief event of the republican
committee's meeting was the resigna
tion of Governor Kibbey as chairman.
He gave as his reason that the cam
paign might place him In a position
where the duties of chairman and
governor would conflict. The gen
eral opinion is that the cause of his
resignation came from the opposition
of the corporations. His tirade against
them and demand that the coming
campaign against statehood must be
held as subordinate to the campaign
against corporation tax dodging, cer-
tainly gave color to the last opiniou.
The governor showed his inconsist
ency in demanding greater taxation
for the corporations and yet Joining
with them in the fight against state
hood when the corporations all know
that opposition to statehood by the
corporations is that they will not be
able to dodge taxes iu a state as they
do in the territory.
But the greatest event of the day
and one of the most Important iu the
history of Arizona, took place after
the convention had adjourned. It was
then that the joint statehood dele
gates of Apache, Navajo. Mohave,
Graham, Santa Cruz, Plnia and Yuma
counties resolved themselves into an
organization with Gen. T. F. Wilson
of Pima, president; O. M. Gaddis,
treasurer; and Hon. Chas. T. Hoff as
secretary. General Wilson is a re
publican, Mr. Hoff is a democrat. An
executive committee of one from each
county was agreed upon, to be divided
liet ween the two parties The name
of the organization is the Joint State
hood 1-eague of Arizona.
A consensus of the meeting showed
that there is plenty of material in
every county to organize a strong and
apgres-ive league. It was decided that
each county name a vice president,
to work in harmony with General
Wilson at headquarters, at Tucson.
1'ima county.
A strong c'uli has already been or
ganized at Phoenix, and clubs will be
organized in every city in the terri
tory. The fuht is growing re 1 hot.
NYE FAMILY HOLD RE
UNION IN MASSACHUSETTS
Sandwich, Mass.. Aug. 7. Several
hundred members of the American
brani h of the Nye family met here
today at their annual family re
union. William U Nye, of this ci'y,
is the host or the occasion. An in
terest. ng program for the entertain
ment of tb- vis!Mr.g members of the
family Is, :een prepared.
DENVER ROBBED OF ITS RIGHTS, THE SUPREME COURT APPROVES
PLOT INFOLDED IN WHICH FRANCHISES WERE WRESTED FROM THE PEOPLE
IN THE GUISE OF AN ELECTION-FRAUDS OF THE BALLOT IM
PROVED UPON TO STEAL STREETS AND LIGHTING CON
TRACTS LIKE OFFICES HAVE BEEN STOLEN.
DENVER. COLO.. AUG. 7 HOW $50,000,000 WORTH OF FRAN
CHISES WERE STOLEN, AND HOW THE SUPREME COURT SAVES
THEM TO THE THIEVES. IS THE LATEST CHAPTER IN THE SHAME
FUL STORr OF CORPORATION CONTROL OF THE CITY AND STATE.
UPON THE EXTENT TO WHICH THE PEOPLE WILL RESENT
THE ENCROACHMENT UPON THEIR RIGHTS DEPENDS THE FUTURE
HISTORY OF THE STATE.
Denver has a new charter whlc'ii,
though framed by the corporations,
was lauded as a weapon of defense
against gritting councils. The peo
ple are supposed to deal with the cor
porations dirtct when franchises are
involved. The charter provides that
before any franchise can be granted,
it shall be submitted to an election.
The Joker In the provision Is the iimit
upon suffrage. Upon a francnise ques
tion only taxpaying citizens are
given a voice.
"This llm..s the consideration to
the stable portion of the communty,"
announced the framers of the section,
which cut off from any voice those
who pay seven-tenths of all Denver's
public service charges.
The provision was loosely drawn,
purposely. It is believed. Election of
ficials adapted a curbstone Interpreta
tion of the law, ruling that, since toe
regular registration list, did not Iden
tify taxpayers, the possession of a tax
receipt should be the ticket of ad
mission to the franchise farce.
Flogged Into Line.
A vigorous fight against the fran
chise conspiracy was maue by the Mu
nicipal Ownership league, led by u.
S. Senator Patterson.
The machine was busy. Every In
fluence of state, county and city offl-
STATISTICS OF
AMERICAN
CITIES WITH MORE
THAN 30,000
There Are 151 Such Cities
in The United States
With Debts of
MOKE THAN THE WHOLE
NATIONAL DEBT TODAY
Washington, D. C, Aug. 7. The
census bureau today Issued a bulle
tin of statistics for 1904, on cities
having a population of over .10,000.
The cities covered numbered 151. Of
these New oik held the largest laud
area, 209,218 acres. The total corpor
ate expenditures of the 151 cities for
the fiscal year of 1904, were $554,440,
215, of which those of New York con
stituted $167,000,171, or three-tenths.
Though New York has only twice the
population of Chicago, its curent ex
penses are nearly four times as great.
The total receipts of the cities were
$594,175,998, of which $172,423,858
were for taxes and other revnues, and
$121,752.14') from loans, increasing
indebtedness. Receipts from munic
ipal industries, such as gas and water
works, amounted to $112,28t!,827. The
aggregate debt of the 151 cities at the
close of the year was $1,531, 4(12,655,
and debt, less sinking funds, $1,228,
216,933, or more than one-fourth
greater than the national debt. The
per capita debt, less sinking funds, I
was $56.97.
T
BE FINELY SANITARY
Washington, D. C, Aug. 7. By di
rection of Acting Secretary Oliver the
military secretary has written letters
to the commanding general of each of
the camps of Instruction located in
different parts of the country, as fol
lows: "lu view of the length of
time that the troops will be in camp
and the consequent possibility of tue
outbreak of camp diseases, such as
typhoid fever, dysentery, malarial
fever, etc., the attention of camp
commanders is called to the ueces-
sity for strict enforcement of nieas- ,
tires to prevent si'ch diseases. The
general principles of camp sanitation;
are set forth in the field service reg-1
ulatious and other manuals, but the
particular rules to lie applied will j
vary with the local conditions, which;
make plain the necessity for personal;
study by each camp commander of
the problems iu sanitation arising at
his camp, with a view to their best ;
solution. In malarious districts ttios
ciuito netj anil loul nets lionM le
I Used.
CONVENTION OF HORTICUL
TURISTS IN MACON. GA.
Macon. Ga., Aug. 7. A large num-
iht or horticulturists, floriculturists,
and agriculturists of this state are
assembled here to attend the annual
meeting f the (Jeorgit Horticultural
Society, which has its headquarters
in Augusta. In connection with the
meeting an interesting and instruc
tive exhibit !m has been arranged,
which is attracting sonsideraMe in
terest. Boston Wool Market Unactive.
Boston, Aug. 7 The wo 1 market
is Inactive, business seemingly to be
confined to slinlit transfers and to
sampling new offerings, it. Is declared
tha no' tnougn ousines's has laen
done to -stablia the range of prices.
'elals.was thrown in its favor. Every!
; indirect pressure or banks upon busi
: ness men was used. The whole sys
tem of finance and business was ar
rayed against, tne men and women
; who desired to save the clty'g uirth
j right and not bind Its future against
possible public ownership of Its utili
ties. Packing the Tax List.
In spite of its advantage the ma
j chine staggered. Canvasses showed
j that 2,000 more votes would be nearer
;than It could figure on.
A tax receipt decision by that court
of appeals made a way.
1 On the day before the election the
city tax receiver's books were turned
over to the machine. Gas and tram-j
vay clerks worked all night making
"stahle ' citizens In the "red llgln
dNtrlct out of disreputable women and
their depraved male pensioners, and
of criminals, uelatives of public utility
employes were also pressed into ser
vice as made-to-order taxpayers.
More than 2,ikio tax receipts were
issiied over the ruboer stamp signa
ture of the tax receiver who was at
home ill. He afterward died of shame
thn his office had betn so used.
These tax receipts as badges of solid
citizenship were paradoxes. They In
dicated payments of from 4 to 40 cents
on real estate; fractions of lets In re-
FIGHT OF LITHOGRAPHERS
HAS WAXED WARMER.
EACH SIDE IS
Confident of Ability to Hold
Out as Long as the
Others.
STRIKERS ARE SAID TO
NUmdLK r ULLY 30.000
New York, Aug. 7. President
Stecher, of the Employing lithograph
ers' association, against the members
of which oO.ooo men are on a strike,
issued the following statement to
day: "We are prepared to continue the
fight six months, and if necessary, a
year. Our members are unanimously
in favor of arbitration and the open
shop."
President Hamilton- of the Litlio
graphers' association, said:
"We have funds enougli for an
eight months' fight, and the men are
all standing firm."
YACHT CLUB RACE FOR
THE A8T0R CUP
Newport, R. I., Aug. 7. Never be
fore was there so much rivalry
among the members of the New York
Yacht Club and never so much eag
erness to win the Aastor Cup as this
year. The race for the Astor Cup
which Is being sailed today off New
port, will undoubtedly go down in
history as one of the most spirited
contests ever held in this part of the
country.
The races of the New Y'ork Yacht
Club have attracted thousands of
craft from all parts of the coast, and
when the competing ships and sloops
started for the starting line today
they were accompanied by a formid
able fleet of racing and pleasure
craft, more numerous than any gath
ering of yachts, launches, sloops,
schooners and other kinds of boats
ever seen together In this harbor.
Among the boats taking part in the
race are some of the swiftest yachts
and sloops of this part of the coun
try, many of which have won Import
ant races In the past. Colonel Astor
this year, as last, has made the
sloops prize the more valuable. Tif
fany &. Co. have made the prizes,
which are of unusal value ami
beauty. The cup for sloops Is of 18
carat gold and goblet shaped. It has
two handles and stands eleven and
three-eighths inches high, to the brim.
The weight, was tlti pennyweights,
an 1 the capacity is about one and
one-half pints. A figure of Victory,
in relief, holding a laurel wreath In
each hand, appears on the front of
the cup. It stands at the conven
tionalized bow of a vessel. The
scrolls which form the bow are re
peated four times around the body
of the cup and immediately below
a band of short curved lines symbol
ize water The inscription "Astor
("up for Sloops," iu raised letters, Is
above the figure, around the rim of
the cup. The stem which connects
the body of the cup to the base Is
chased with a delicate vertical figure
of ser lis.
The Astor Cup for schooners con
sists of twelve sterling silver plates.
These incisure ten and one-half
Inches in diameter and have a nar
row f-croll border. On each of the
plates is the following inscription:
"Astor Cup for Schooners, won by.."
The winning yacht's name to be ti'I
ded Immediately after the race.
J
THIS IS THE LOOT:
TRAMWAY CO Twenty-year ex-
te.ision of present franchise, with
blanket, provision for sole right
to every street In the city. Prom-
i ises nothing Tmt $60,000 a year i
to the Improvement of parks, by f
which It would benefit mostly
i through Increased traffic.
GAS COMPANY Twenty-year
extension of franchise, beginning 't
1914. Abrogation of contract by
which part of city's payment for
'S lights was to be credited to the
cost of a plant to become municl-
pally owned. Transfer of all these
4 credits to the company. Ten-year
3 contract for public lights.
rtttitifiitrirttii
mote suodlvislons.
No deeds were ever made for the
lols. They stood In the hands of a
real estate company which, on the
rack, could give no reason why 2,uuO
people should so generously pay taxes
m Its property.
These tax receipts "won'' the day,
and have, seemingly, settled all fran
chise problems tor this city for two
decades. The supreme court lias done
the rest.
By a series of decisions in which all
precedent even, the lawyers claim,
the constitution of the state was set
aside and every attempt blocked to
open the ballot boxes and Investigate
the frauds.
Upon the scant hope of a suit In the
federal c nrt the advocates of munici
pal ownership base their fight to make
the thieves disgorge.
TEXAS FLOOD
DISASTROUS
DOES GREAT DAMAGE
IN THAT STATE
I Many- Drowned. Hundreds
Houseless. Half Million
j property Swept Away
TRAINS ARE CUT OFF
- AND WIRES ARE DOWN
St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 7. A special to
the Post-Dispatch from Fort Worth,
Tex., says:
Twenty-five persons were d,rowned,
hundreds rendered homeless and a
half-miHlon dollars' worth of prop
erty destroyed as a result of a flood
in south Texas today, when the Colo
rado river was forced out of its hanks
by heavy rains. The death list is
'growing hourlv and it is feared the
I worst disaster In Texas since the
Galveston flood has occurred. Relief
! trains are cut off, wires are down,
!and the fate of the inhabitants of the
isolated towns is unknown.
I RELIEF COMES TO NEW
YORKERS FROM HEAT;
New York, Aug. 7. There was some
I relief today from the excessive heat i
which prevailed over New York the
last three days. Thunderstorms and I
lower temperature are predicted to-'
night. Two ipersons, sleeping on fire
escapes last night fed to the street
! and were killed.
SARATOGA GAMBLING
DEN RAIDED
Saratoga, N. V., Aug. i. The first
raid on tne gambling houses in Sara
toga since the time of "Cale" Mitchell,!
was made last night following the re
ceipt by oneriff Cavanaugh of com
munication from Gov. lligglns regard
ing the enforcement of the law. Bridge
; which cluli house, conducted by Joe'
I Ulltnan, was raided by the jiollce, the
I proprietors and employes arrested and
l the furniture removed. The players
were not taken into custody. ,
APPEAL OF EDNA HOPPER SUIT
IS DISMISSED BY COMMITTEE
l.cndon, Aug. 7. The Judicial com
mittee of tne privy council today rec
ommended the dismissal of the apiieal
of Hunstiiuir vs. Diin.-nuiir and Hop
per s. Dunsmulr.
The appeal resuoe.1 tiom the suit
of Kdna Wallace lio.,i !', to break the
will of tne late Alexander Dunsmuir,
her Btep-father, in which bis brother,
James Dunsmuir. toitner premier of
British Columi.nu. was the principal
lega'ee.
OHIO FALLS HOLINESS ASSO
I CIATION HOLDS MEETING
New Albany, Ind., Aug 7. The
nineteenth annual meeting of the
Ohio Falls Holiness association
opened today on the camp meeting
grounds on the Silver Hills, west of
( here, til the terminus of the Highland
division of the I iiiisviUo & South
ern Indiana Traction company. The
grounds are in excellent, condition
! and the attendance i., larger than
ever before. A large number of
excellent speakers will deliver ad
dresses during the three weeks of the
' meet Ing.
Money Market.
New York. Aug. T Money on rail, i
easy, S'il": I rime uiwrtaiitlle, Zzra
3t ; silver, (i i5. j
I 1 I Mill 3
HONEST ELECTION LEAGUE ATTORNEYS EXAMINING BOGUS
TAX RECEIPTS IN - - JOE JOHNSON'S COURT ROOM. THE. ARE
LEFT lO RIGHT ERNEST LEE WILLIAMS. LUCIUS W. HOYT AND E.
f. COSTIGAN.
LOOTING 0
BANK III
Worse Even Than Was Walsh
Bank Failure Some
Months Ago.
WARRANTS OUT FOR BOTH
PRESIDENT AND CASHIER
Stealing Began Before 1901 --At
That Time It Amounted
to IS250.000.
Chicago, " 111., Aug. 7. President
Paul G. Stenslaud, of the Milwaukee
Avenue State bank, -will probably be
i nested us soon as he reaches Chi
cago, o rcan bo found. Bank Ex
aminer Jones, who closed the bank
yeisterday, said today that Stenslaud
surely had guilty knowledge of the
looting of the bank. The 22,000 de
positors are losing hope of recovering
the $4,200,000 they entrusted to Stena
land's care. Detectives are seeking
Cashier Henry W; Herring, .alleged
embezzler, who Is said to have left
Chicago for Detroit Saturday night,
and is supposed to have gone to Can
ada. Cashier Very Big Man.
Messages were sent broadcast over
the country, asking for the arrest of
Herring. Ho Is described as "40 to 45
years old, ti feet 2 Inches tall, 275
pounds, stout build, dark complexion,
chestnut hair, dark brown moustache,
light suit; he Is a good dresser.'"
More Police Provided.
Additional police were today placed
at the bank and Assistant Chief
Schuetter personally took charge of
the force on guard. The call for addi
tional police was caused by the fear
that the depositors und their friends
would storm the bank and precipitate
a riot when the rumors spread that
the contents of some of the safety de
posit vaults had been tampered with.
Persons with money In the vaults
were said to have found their savings
gone. Bank Examiner- Jones relter
ated his statement that he could give
no estimate of (he amount of the
shortage.
Absconders in Canada.
Tile speculations began before 1901.
At the beginning of that year a short
age of SJ'iOOOO is said to have ex
isted. Theodore Stensland holds a
power of attorney from his father.
President Stenslaud, to dispose of all
his property in order to make good
as far as possible the peculations.
Members of the clearing house com
iii. me expressed the belief that both
Stenslaud and Herring are now in
Canada.
Judge BtetaiKi of the superior court
today appointed John C. Fetzer as re
ceiver for the closed bank.
Warrant for Stensland.
The court fixed the bond of receiver
at ll.iiiin, i. on complaint of Bank
Examiner Jones, Justice Stevenson
issued a warrant for the arrest of
President Stensland, on the charge of
receiving deposits after he knew the
bank was insolvent. The description
of Steuland, sent broadcast, says he Is
"about " years old, 5 feet 9 or 10
Inches tall, blue eyes, about 200
pounds, stout build, light complexion."
He formerly wore a beard, but Is
probably now smooth shaven.
TROTTING RACES AND FAIR
BEING HELD IN TASLEY, VA.
Taslcy. Ya., Aug. 7. The ninth an
nua! fair and trotting races under
the auspices of the Peninsula Fair
association will open today for a four
days' meet. Many of the best trot
ters and pacers in this part of the
country have been entered for the
various races, oi which mere will ue
three every day. The prizes range
from to $:!''.
TLNNIS ENTHUSIASTS MEET
IN ST. JOHNSBURY, VT.
St. Johnsbury, Vt.. Aug. 7. The
annual Vermont. State Tennis cham
pionship tournament opened here
this morning wi'h a large number of
entries, which primuses an unusunlly
interesting an 1 spirited coutest. The
present state champion is Setup
Buss, of S.iti Antonio, Tex.
A' 9
STRIKE HAS
REACHED IIS
CONCLUSION
And Will Be Called off To
night In St. Petersburg
and Other Places.
ARREST OF LEADERS WAS
AID IN REPRESSION WORK
Workmen Blame Revolutionists
Who Advised Postponement
Till Fall For Strike.
St. Petersburg, Aug. 7. The Work
men's council has decided to call off
the strike at St. Petersburg. An
nouticement will be issued tonight cr
tomorrow. This action does not ppiy
to provinces but there is little doubt
but that the workmen there will fol
low the St. Petersburg example.
Many Factories Already at Work.
More than half of the factories here
resumed work this morning. While
the employes of some establishments
of Moscow are still out, none of the
predictions by parties that of an or
ganized strike movement, were ful
filled. Railroad men, whose co-opera
tion was vital, could net be Induced
to give the signal for strike, owing
to fear that the majority of the men
would not obey. While repressions
and arrests of leaders were undoubt
edly groat factors in bringing about
the situation, It Is apparent that the
moment was Ill-chosen for the strike,
The people were not In a temper to
support It. Consequently tlie revolu
tionary leaders who really inspired
the movement with intention of trans
forming - into an armed uprising
have suffered severe loss of iprestigo
and proletariat organizations through
which they worked nave been weaken
ed, it Is probably they will not re
cover. The government naturally Is
greatly rejoiced over its victory.
RAILROAD ORDERS REFUSE
TO JOIN THE 8TRIKE
Moscow, Aug. 7. Several red ffag
demonstrations were broken up last
night tiy the dragoons, but the city
generally Is quite. The central com
mltteo of railroad men's unions has
refused to co-operate In the strike
which is collapsing. Many factories
here are resuming work. The strike
organizers lay much b.amo for the sit
uation to the social revolutionists, who
favored deferring the strike till aut
umn.
VIRGINIA BAR ASSOCIATION
HOLDS 8ESSION AND OUTING
Hot Springs, Va., Aug. 7. The Vlr
glnla State Bar association met here
today for a three days' session, which
is also In the nature of an outing.
The attendance is quite large, and
among those present are many dis
tinguished members of the bench
and the bar, among them Justice
Brewer, of the United States supreme
court; Judge A. A. Phlegar, president
of the association; Mlclah Woods, of
Charlottesville, for years attorney for
the commonwealth; E. If. Jackson of
Washington, I). C.T "W. T. Shields, of
Islington, and many others. Many of
thera will deliver addresses before
the meeting.
PAUL MORTON STUDIES
INSURANCE IN GERMANY
Berlin, Aug. 7. Paul Mort n, presi
dent of ihe Equitable Life Assurance
society, spent yesterday here, going
over the records of the company's
German business. He left for Paris
last night, will sail for America Au
gust 15. Morton said: "My investiga
tions in Europe Justify mo In Reliev
ing that the campaign against Ameri
can Insurance companies on this side
;f the Atlantic Is practically subsided.
I I believe all of us will snortly be do
ing i ur old tune business here.
WOMEN SUFFRAGISTS MEET
AT COPENHAGEN
Copenhagen, Aug. 7. The annual
conference of the International
league ot Women Suffragists opened
hre today under the chairmanship of
Mrs. Carrie Chapman-Catt, of ,ew
York, president of tho league, and will
hold daily sessions until August 11.
Twelve countries are represented.
democratic
HUM Hffi
IN IOWA AND
Idaho-Bryan Choice of Party
In Both States-Iowa
Is Divided
INTO FACTIONS ON OTHER
ISSUES ANDCANDIDATES
Idaho Is Greatly Excited Over tn
Question of Mormonlsm and
Polygamous Marriages.
Wlaterloo. Iowa, Aug. 7. The entire
Interest cf the democratic
ventlon centers In the nomination for
governor, it was announced that
State Senator" Claude Porter of Cen
terville, has consented to be a candi
date and hla district will present his
name. Friends of George Ball and
John Denlson also are active.
Fioht Between Factions.
The conservatives controlled tha
caucuses to choose the committees. la
the fight for the nomination for gov
ernor, the so-called conservatives ral
lied around ex-Senator Ball, while the
men who turee JK ars ego, cornered the
convention for Hearst, rallied around
Denlson. The conservatives look ta
ex-Senator Porter as a compromise.
Send Telegram to Bryan.
Chairman Daniel Slgourney was In
structed to cable Vvm. J. Bryan at
Vlnice a message extending greeting
of the Iowa democrats and the Best
wishes for safe Journe yaome.
IDAHO DEMOCRATS ARE
BITTER ON MORMONS
Coeur d'Alene, Idano, Aug. 7.
When the democratic state conven
tion assembled today there was pros
pect of a fierce fight and bitter per
sonalities. As to the choice of candi
dates few seem to care. Bryan's en
dorsement for president is a matler of
course. But the Mormon question will
not down. The platform plank fav
ored by DuBols forces calls tor "ex
tirpation oi polygamy; complete sep-t.-tlon
of church and state," and the
passage of laws forbidding any one to
vote, serve as Juror, or hold" civil of
fice, wba e living in patriarchal, "plur
al, celestial marriage or who teaches
or advises such marriage. That such
a plank win be adopted is predicted.
NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS
HOLD CONVENTION
Niagara Falls, N. Y.f Aug. 7. The
twenty-sixth annual convention- of
the National American Photograph
ers' association opened here today at
the Cataract House. The attendance
Is unusually large and every state
and territory is represented. The
entire lower floor of the Cataract
House is devoted to the display of
the work of members of the associa
tion. One of the most striking fea
tures of the exhibition this year is
the foreign exhibit showing the work
of tho best photographers of the var
ious countries of Europe.
URBANNA, ILL., GREETS
FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION
Urbanna, 111., Aug. 7. The annual
state tournament of the State Fire
men's association opened here today
and will continue for three days. The
attendance Is unusually large and the
citizens of Urbana, headed by the
Commercial Club of Urbana, have
made every effort to make the meet
ing a great success. Valuable prises
have been donated for the various
contests of the tournament and an
Interesting program for the entertain
ment of the visiting firemen has been
arranged.
TELEGRAPHIC MARKETS
St. Louis Wool Market.
St. Ixiuls, Aug. 7. Wool market,
steady; unchanged.
Lead' Market.
New Y'ork, Aug. 7. Lead, dull, $5.75
copper, firm, $18.62tf3$18.7X.
Chicago Livestock.
Chleaeo. Auir. 7. "attl rivelotfl
4.550; market, strong; CTjeves, 3.75p
i.50; cows and heifers, $1.25T5.30;
stockers and feeders, t2M4H.2'; Tex
ans, $3.00,4.75; westerners, $3.butfi
5.25; calves, $5.007.00.
Sheep receipts, 15,100; market.
strong; sheep, $3.25a.35; lambs.
$4.85(8 6.00.
Grain and Produce.
Chicago, Aug. 7. Closing quota
tions; Wheat Sept. 73c; Dec. 75,c.
Corn Sept. ti'JVic; Dec. 45c.
Oats riopt. J1V; Dec. Si'ic.
Pork Sept. $17,124; Jan. 14 20.
Ribs Sept. $.25Vi; Oct. $S 5.
Ird Sep!, $S.87'; ut. $S2H-
Stock irket.
New York, Aug. Closing blocks:
Atchison S4
Do pfd looVi
New York Central 14
Pennsylvania 134
Southern Pacific 7tilfc
Union Pacific 1374
Amalgamated Copper 103
Lnion pacific, pfd l4
L'ulted States Steel 40
Do pfd lOsVs
Kansas City Market.
Kansas City, Aug. 1. Cattle re
ceipts, ti.Ooo; market, strong to 10c
higher; native steers, $1.005.25;
southern steers, $2.75'5 $4.50; southern
cows, $2.00( 3.25 ; nativo cows and
heifers, $2.00ii5 25; stockers and feed
ers, $2.i6$4.60; bulls, $2.00fj'$3.50;
calves, i3.5ofc5.50; western fed steers,
$3,754 ti.00; western fed cows. '.SO

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