OCR Interpretation


Albuquerque evening citizen. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1905-1907, November 07, 1906, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of New Mexico

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020615/1906-11-07/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE FOUR

ALBUQUERQUE EVENING CITIZEN.
PAGE FOUR.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7. T?06.
THE ALBUQUERQUE CITiZFN
Published Daily and Weekly.
By The Citizen Publishing Company
W. . STRICKLER,
President.
W. T. McCREIQHT,
Business Manager.
THE LOCAL CONDITION
It Is hardly necessary for The Cltlzrn to nay thnt the
results of yesterday's election In this county wore nMther
irhat It exports nor desired. This paper brieves heart
lly that the best way to nialntniu republican principles In
the ascendency Is through the maintenance of republican
organisation. Hence, It always has supported the regu
lar action of its party In political nominations, lind It
expects its course In the future to be along the same
lines. If there are party differences or party grievances,
It has Beemed to The Citizen that such differences should
)e settled and such grievances adjusted within the party
and not by alliances outside of It. '
Put It is evident that many republicans have differed
from The Citizen In this matter, as shown, by their votes
on yesterday. Such republicans, together with the dem
ocrats with whom they united, have Bbown a largo ma
jority In the county, and The Cltizea most heartily en
dorses the principle thnt the majority should rule when
their wishes are properly expressed.
It follows, therefore, that this paper ha no intention
to relight in Its columns the lost campaign. It accepts
the decision of the majority, and the campaign has ended.
The Cltlsen made no personal attack upon the candidates
of the firslon party, and it accepts their triumph with
no shadow of personal grudge or Ill-feeling. And while
saying this for itself. It would urge the same upon all
its readers, regardless of whether they belong to the
successful majority or the vanquished minority.
Already the democrats are saying that two yenrs
hence, or even in the next city election, they will have
a straight ticket of their own, thus Ignoring the fact that
It was republican assistance that gave efficiency to the
movement on yestereday. There remains, therefore, but
one thing for the republicans of all factions to do. That
is to accept the result, bury their differences, banish
hard feelings and come together again In a united l-iyalt y
to the republican party, and a united labor in the main
tenance of Its supremacy.
In conclusion of this aspect of local political condi
tional, The Citizen desires to say that It cannot look upon
yesterday's results as a condemnation of republican prin
ciples, the republican party or the republican candidates.
Most of the latter were men of irreproachable character,
of marked and well-known ability, of undoubted probity,
and whose republicanism and fitness for the offices to
which they aspired do not admit of denlel. That they
were defeated only shows that a large part, and probably
the largest part of the republicans of Bernalillo county,
are thoroughly opposed to the present official county
organization of the party. It C"es not seem to The
Citizen that any other conclusion is possible. Under
other conditions the republican ticket would undoubtedly
have been elected. In the cause of peace ami harmony,
and of future republican success. The CMtizfti is con
vinced that the county republican crganlzataion must be
changed and satisfactorily formed on another basis.
NATIONAL OUTLOOK
At this writing It. is too early to form any correct
Idea of the results In congressional elections. On Mon
day evening, at the close of the campaign. Chairman
Sherman's estimate of republican majority In the
Sixtieth congress was fifty-eight. ,
Most of the lepublloan prophets, says the Globe
Democrat, have been placing the lead at between forty
and fifty. The present majority Is 112, hut this is so
large that no republican expected to see any close
approach to It made in the election of 1906. The re
publicans have been carrying the house ever since 1894,
beginning in that year. In 1894 the republican majority
was J50, but ..that was In the middle of Cleveland's
term, when the panic of' 1893, the split over the silver
Issue, the hauling down of Ihe flag In Hawaii and the
Wilson -Gorman "perfidy and dishonor" tariff all con
verged to overwhelm the .democratic party. ;In the off
.years since the republicans regained the presidency
la 1896 the republican majorities were much smaller
than are predicted for 1900. The republican lead was
twenty in the election of 1898 and thirty In that of 1902.
The Globe-Democrat also says that if Hearst shall
go within 50,000 votes of carrying New Tork he Is likely
to be the national leader of. the democratic party in
1908, otherwise the leadership will revert to Bryan.
THE CAMPAIGN COST
The New Mexican thinks that despite the fact that
netlher party in this territory had much money to ex
pend, the campaign Just closed did not cost less than
$125,000. This estimate is based on the fact that the
legislative anU constitutional candidates in the field
numbered 2ini, while the county candidates numbered
500, giving a total of 700 candidates. This calculation
shows that one voter out of every 100 in the territory
was a candidate for office. Of course, this made local
contests overshadow, in pubuic opinion, both the dele
gate and the statehood question.
One important feature which the New Mexican
finds in the campaign Is that little or nothing was
spent In vote-buying or other illegal purposes. The
effort to Influence the public mind was made through
the press, the rostrum and the mails. KYom Santa Ke
alone the republican central committee sent out. more
than 100,000 pieces of mall matter, and there as here
the major part of the meager funds was spent in the
cause of publicity. This was quite an improvement
on election methods of only a few years ago.
Las Vegas Optic: The campaign has been a warm
one this year. lloth .sides have worked hard and per
haps in the heat of the battle things have been said
and done which calm afterthought would couple with
regrets. But the campaign is over, and on the whole in
San Miguel county it has lieen a decent and honorable
one. The wounds left by political battle do not burn
for long and ever the wars disappear. Ia'I us put away
politics for a time and consider the business and rmn
mercial interests of Ijts Vegas.
The t'ilzeu agrees with the New Mexican that
now is the time to renew statehood work with vigor.
The best plan and the one promising immediate suc
cess, is to hold a constitutional convent ion at Santa Ke
next month, formulate a constitution, submit it to the
legislative assembly foif ratification In January, and then
present it to cougrs to show that the vot cast in
this territory in favor of statehood Is hacked up by a
sentiment that. Is thoroughly in earnest.
New Mexican: The registration for the tall elec
tion has giveu conclusive evidence of the marvelous
growth of Ihe eastern pari of New Mexico and to some
extent of other sections such as tirant county. lu
fact, there is no part of the territory that ha& failed
to give some evidences of growth in populataion since
two years ago. considering that the registration lists
were much more carefully culled of dead names and
the names of tho.M- lm have removed, lhau during
preceding years.
The consumption of sugar in Italy is said to be
six and one-half pounds per head, as against sixty-four
pounds lu tliis country. There are thirty-three beet
sugar factories in Italy aud the beet fields aggregate
100,000 acres. The beet sugar Industry is " that
needs developing right here at Albuquerque.
In nearly all the states public opinion is against
the convention system and in favor of more power in
the people, and through the questioning of candidates
aud publication of replies the people's rule is becoming
a live issue.
We met the enemy and we are hls'u. Hut It Is
better to have fought and failed tnan never to have
fought at all.
00XXC)XOCKXKKXXXX)C00(XXXXXXX
WONDERFUL DEMAND FOR
RAILWAY ROLLING STOCK
tX)00(XH(?00000XXXX0X)0000
This table, taken from the Hallway Age. shows the
total orders placed for railway equipment during the
twelve months of onch of the years from 1 fx '2 to 1905,
luring forty-one weeks of Itm.V and during the period
of very nearly thirty-nine weeks of 19o t.t dale:
Freight I'asseimer Loco-
cars ears. motives.
IW2 195.248 3. 459 4,556
l!to: 108.9:t; 2.3 10 .1.283'
1904 13.5li1 2.21:1 2,583
1903 341.315 3.289 ti.265
1905. 41 weeks 19fi,H"2 2,297 4.131
1906, 31 weeks 218.298 1 992 4.323
"Figures such as these speak for themselves, but
stated in words, not only in the aggregate of orders
placed. In nine months of 1905 20,000 cars in excess of
the total for the entire twelve months of any year previ
ous to 1905, but 20,0tio more cars have already been or
dered this year than were ordered In a period In 1905
which was two weeks longer. Last week alone not less
than 44,000 freight cars were ordered, a clrcumseance
which under conditions existing a few years ago would
have been sufficient to cause no end of comment, but
which is now looked upon as but little out of the ordinary
Yet with such an Impetus, there are doubtless those who
will question the prediction that January 1, 1907, will
find the total of orders recorded In 1906 greater than
that of 1905, because of the fact that the roads which
are large annual buyers have placed their orders earlier,
and, whilo contracting in many Instances for fewer cars
than last year, have raised the totals to ti.e point which
is not a true Indication of conditions. A study of the
records at hand, however, shows thata it Is the orders
for cars In lots of from 500 to 2,000 that form the basis
for the total, and with the knowledge that the moral
effect In this time of the year of such orders as hnve
recently been placed has tremendous cumulative results,
the prediction Is made that the close of 1906 will sec
all records for orders for frcieht cars surpassed."
OOOOOOOO 00XXXXXXX3C0XXX)000
MOST WONDERFUL BRIDGE
g WHICH EVER WAS BUILT
OOCX0XKCK?CXXDOXK0XXXXXXXKi
The Royal gorge of the Arkansas river, In Colorado,
one of the scenic wonders of the world, is to have a new
feature to add to the amazement of the traveler.
Nature began the wonder-working by using the
river to cut a gorge seven miles long through the solid
rock, which rises in continuous, semi-perpendicular walls
for hundreds and thousands of feet above the roaring
stream.
Then man resolved to force a way through this gorge
for a railroad, and In so doing worked another wonder.
Where the gorge was too narrow to give room for the
track beside the river the engineers devised the famous
hanging bridge, which has long been regarded as one
of the triumphs of railroad building. It parallels te river
for seventy feet and hangs in tire air from steer roils
spuported from tinisses anchored in the rock walls.
Soon the traveler, gazing upward from the hanging
bridge, will see the towering walls of the gorge spanned
by what will seem to him a cobweb bridge. It will be
a bridge, a bridge of steel, and the traveler may see a
trolley car gliding across his vision half a mile up in
the air.
At the spot, where this bridge will be suspended
across the chasm the walls are 2,62 1 feet high, and the
gorge is fifty feet across at the bottom and . 230 feet
across at the top. Apart from the scenic considerations
the bridgt will be noteworthy as the highest In the world.
Indeed, It Is In a class by Uself, its nearest competitor
being the new Zambezi bridge, 430 feet In the air.
The bridge will be built of steel cables and of flat
steel, and the curved girders that support the structure
will be Anchored In the granite walls, so that nothing
short of a violent earthquake can loosen them. A feature
of the bridge will be a plate-glass floor, which will en
able visitors to gaze down into the gorge without danger,
and steel railings will make It impossible for anyone to
rail off.
The work is being done by the Canyon City, Flor
ence and Royal Gorge Interurbun Electric Railway com
pany, which Is extending a line from Canyon City and
Florence eleven miles to the top of the Royal gorge. The
ascent is 2,800 feet and the summit is 7,900 feet above
sea level. From Ute summit the cars will return to
Canyon City by another route, running fifteen miles
by the force of gravity alone. The bridge will cost
11,000,000 and the track extension another million.
The American Inventor for October states that the
spanning of this fearful chasm is 'one of the most ditti
cult and dangerous projects yet attempted by engineers.'
and says that the bridging of the Royal gorge hitherto
has been deemed rriosterous from un engineering view
point; indeed, the possibilities of overcoming the ensiin
eertng difficulties in building a road on ether side of
this gorge have been gravely questioned until lately
The building of this new bridge, therefore, shows
several interesting things: That , the American people
will go in crowds to see a wonderful natural view; that
the science of railroad engineering Is making progress
and that there Is no limit, to the enterprise of the Amer
ican in filling what he conceives to be a real want. Chi
cago Inter-Ocean.
xxxxxxxxoxxxxoxxxxoxxooo
GOOD REASONS AGAINST
8 MPANESE IN SCHOOLS
xxcooxxxcxxxxxcckoooxx
The Japanese consul at San Francisco is complain
ing t hat under a local law Japanese children are exclud
ed from the public schools and relegated to the oriental
schools," with Chinese, Indians and negroes. This evi
dence of ambition on the part of the Japs is not unusual
They seem determined to force a higher standard than Is
accorded to other oriental races, and they are bavin
some success.
It is singular that while this demand for admission
to the public schools is being made in California, the
report of the fommissiouer of labor on Hawaii states
that exactly the opposite trours is being taken by the
Japanese there. I hey avoid the public schools there and
maintain separate schools of their own, wherever prac
tic-able. The eviiU-nt reason of this is that the popula
tion of Hawaii is much mixed, and the Batlves aud Chi
nese often mil number the Americans in a school district
to a very large extent. Indeed, the commissioner of labor
says the American families have not only taken their
children out of the public schools, but have aetuually
moved out of the neighborhoods hi the islands where i lie
excess of orientals was very large. The reason give
fur this is stated:
The American pupil brought up among children of
ail races and attending school In a district where a ma
jority of ills schoolmates are Japanese never acquires
a perfect mastery of his own language and speaks
"pigeon English," often with a foreign accent. His pro
gress In all studies has to be regulated by the progress
of classes composed in great part of young people whose
knowledge of English is imperfect, and where linguistic
training necessarily supersedes instruction In the es
sentials of the science or other subject taught. In ottier
than purely pedagogic ways he is at a disadvantage. In
personal habits and customs and social and ethical Ideas
he is apt to grow like those with whom be is associated
in sclosil life.
It is evident that these race mixtures produce prob
lems not contemplated by those who have assumed that
the process of amalgamation would go on everywhere
as it lias usually done in t. I'nited States. They have
ovei looked the difference made by the overwhelming su
perior numbers of American at home. In Hawaii, how
ever, the commissioner of labor says: "It Is an open
question whether the final result in the scaools will be
the Americanizing of the oriental or the orientalizing of
the schools." Indianapolis Star.
THE JAFFA
Grocery Comp'y.
"Good Things to Eat"
USEmmm
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOPOOOOOOOOO
Our Clothing Is Union Made i
O O
Meadow
Gold
Butter
Ferndell
Coffee
for breakfast
starts the day
. right ....
Jaffa Grocery Co.
"Good Things to Eat"
MAIL ORDERS FILLED THE SAME DAY '
THEY AVE RECEIVED.
0
1 WW
o
o
o
O SHOES
O
that5ma"e!:nl0n ,,"C!",S il '8 ,be best Cm""1'-'
Our garments are made by well pf,,i kiirill TTn,
Siemp,oyed by Manufacturers wi'th liJffi.S.f "ft
It is made under snnltary conditions In dpan -. .,
lated work rooms. ' l" e" '
Look for the Union Label
On Our Garments!
We ask no more for our clean, well made cio'hlng th-.n
other stores ask for "Sweat Shop" work.
TROUSERS... $1.75, $2.00, $2.50, $3.50 to $5.50 '
SUITS $10, $12, $15, $18 to $25
OVERCOATS. .$10, $15, $18, $20, to $25
tZl' HalS' Kl,n,,S"in etc. Union
You will further your own Interest, Mr. Union Man in
wearing our Union Made Clothing. ' '
6VJ. kWANDEEJL
Clothing, Furnishings
OOOOOQOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOQQQQQ
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
c
o
o
o
o
o
Rugs, Crockery, Glassware, Furniture
ARIZONA CLAIMS DE
FEAT OF JOINT STATEHOOD
Phoenix, Arizona, Nov. 6. The
weather is Ideal and a heavy vote Is
expected. The great Interest is the
statehood matter here and through
out the territory. There Is no doubt
of the defeat of Jointure,
1 V5rr jj;a.v-
Cjixu't-"
Do You Know
about our sales of furniture
on the installment plan?
You can just have your
home if you want it. A
dollar or two a week and
its done.
THEN AGAIN IT'S BETTER TO BUY
FROM A PLACE WHERE YOU CAN
GET EVERYTHING FROM THE SAME
STORE, AND SAVE RUNNING SEVER
AL ACCOUNTS. TRY IT.
House Furnishe s
O. W. STRONG'S SONS
House Furnishers
THE HIGHLAND LIVERY
BAMBROOK BROB., Prop.
LIVERY AND BOARDING 8TABLE
8ADDLE HORSES SPECIALTY.
The "Sadie" for mountain parties and
at special, rates on week days.
Auto Phone 604. No. 112 John St.
PIONEER BAKERY
SIMON BALLING, Proprietor
(Successor to Balling Bros.)
WEDDING CAKES A SPECIALTY.
We desire patronage and we guar
antee first class baking.
207 South First Street. Albuquerque.
Rico Hotel and Bar
No. 111 North First Street.
DINELLI & LENCIONI, Proprietors.
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
Meals From 10 Cents Up. Lunches
Put Up for "Travelers.
Rooms By Day, Week or Month.
Thos. F. Keleher
Headquarters for Low Prices
on Leather, Paints, Varnishes,
Brushes and Jap-a-lac
408 W. Railroad Avanua
ELKS' OPERA HOUSE
One Night Only
WEDNESDAY NOV. !4
Richard Carle's Merry Musi
cal Extravaganza
The Maid and the Mummy
With a cast of unusual merit and
FRKI) WARREN as the Mum
my. (lorgeous Costumes, Scen
ery ami Klectilcal Effects.
Prices, 50c, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50
Seats on sale at MATSON'S
Monday, Sow 12 at 9 o'clock.
MR. REYNOLDS WILL SING
"DEARIE" AND "SLUMBER LAND"
BY REQUEST, AT THE ROLER
RINK THIS EVENING. DON'T MISS
HEARING THESE FAVORITES.
Ask for JAFFA'S KRACK KREAM
BREAD snd taks no other.
WILLIAM MclNTOSH, President
SOLOMON LUNA, Vice-President
For the
Best Line of
T. C. NEAD, Tressurer aid Mssijer
in Albuquerque
See Ours
HI) k'iH'ia
flclNTOSH HARDWARE CO.
e
n
C. H. CARNES, O. D.
Scientific Optician
THE BEST IN TOWN
Per Gallon - - - $J.50
Special Price on Large Orders
Delivered to any part of the city
LOUDON'S JERSEY FARM
Phone Colo. Red 92.
EYES TESTED FREE
CORRECT FIT GUARANTEED
114 Railroad Ave., Albuquerque, N. M.
B.K.ADAMS We Keep It Up
COAL
BEST CLARKVILLE LUMP
PER TON $6.50
BEST AMERICAN BLOCK
PER TON $6.50
WOOD
BIG LOAD OF MILL WOOD
FOR $225 AND $2.75
Funeral Director and Licensed Embalmer
Phnn Automatic - tat
i r nones coioraoo, am 100
Cornar Fifth tod Railroad Avanua
R.R.
TICKETS BOUGHT. SOLO
AND EXCHAN6E0
Association Off lea
Transactions
Cuarantaad
Johll S. BeaVenfiOSENFIElO'S, 118 W, R.R.Ave.
502 SOUTH FIRST STREET.
HAIR WORK.
KEEP OUT THE COLD WINDS.i
SEE 'HUDSON FOR WINDOW '
GLASS, I
Mrs. Ku.herfora, at home to anyone
wanting hair work done, every Wed
nesday, at 517 South Broadway.
We keep the quality of our bread
up to the highest. This is possible
by using;
The Best Flour,
The Best Labor,
The Best Methods,
not only in mixing- and baking, but
also in taking- care of and selling
the bread. If you want the best
you'll have to use Balling's Bread.
PIONEER BAKERY,
OT SOUTH riRBT BTRKET.
THE ELITE ROOMING HOUSE
NEAR POSTOFFICC AND DEPOT
No. 113 West Silver Avenue.
D. E. GALLOWAY, Manager.
FEE'S HOT CHOCOLATE, fvVAL.
TON'S DRUG STORE,

xml | txt