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Albuquerque evening citizen. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1905-1907, January 12, 1907, Image 1

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ALBUQUERQUE. NEW MEXICO. SATURDAY EVENING. JANUARY 12. 1907.
The Evening Citizen, In Advance, $9 per pm.
MlviriJ by Cirrlera, 0 ctnti per month.
VOL. 21. NO. 11.
POT
ri II II rv I iy
H
E
HIHII
COURTS GIVE
E
Insurance Companies Alust
Pay Their San Fran
cisco Losses.
THIRTEEN CadHG
ORE WORTHJT.OOO.OOO
Chinese Tongs Get Into Fight In
San Francisco With Some
Killed Others Wounded.
San Francisco, Jan. 12. The North
tier-man Insurance company of Ham-
- burg, which has been ordered by
1 the German courts to pay the claims
against It, had risks amounting to
14.600,000 in the big Are last April.
The company denied its liability on
the ground of the earthquake clause
In the po'.icy, and has paid no
claims. It Is understood by Insurance
men here that the suit in the Ger
man courts was to test this particular
clause, and that the decision was
based upon the puncturation and col
lapse of the clause.
RICH SHIPMENT OF ORE
FROM OOLDFIELD MINES
Sacramento, Calif.. Jan. 12. Thir
teen cars loaded with Goldfleld ore,
valued at $7,000,000, arrived here
last night closely guarded. Each car
contained 100,000 pounds of ore enre
fully Backed.
TWO KIMiEl) AND FIVE ARE
WOUNDED IX FIFTY SHOTS
San Francisco, Jan. 12. During a
fight last night In Oakland, between
two "tongs," two Chinamen were
killed and five wounded. About fifty
shots were exchanged.
H ERCULAN EUM S KOOF
HAS BEEN REMOVED.
Home, Jan. 12. The lava cover
ing the ancient city of Herculaneum
has now been removed and .today
the old city stands out in something
like its pristine glory. It'.has' been
' found that the streets of Herculan
eum are practically walls of solid
concrete and the buildings are sealed
with barriers and roofs of concrete,
for the lava mud has become stone
'-.Tvtth thfe lapB rt lime." "IJUCht the
' xcavation work had to be done with
""jrr.l and blast and owing to t'ais sev
eral priceless art treasures were de
stroyed. The American citizen of
Rome at a meeting today decided to
form an underground museum where
all the uncovered art treasures will
he exhibited.
OIL FINDS REltMtTED
ON MAITOULIX ISLANDS.
Vancouver. B. C, Jan. 12. Oil has
been discovered in vast quantities In
the Manitoulln Islands. All the is
lands with the exce-flon of two be
long to Canada and they cover a
range of one hundred and fifty miles
by seventy or eighty wide. It has
been found that tho cost of sinking
wells on the islands is only about one
third of the cost in the oil fields of
Pennsylvania and West Ontario. It
is announced that the Canadian gov
ernment is going to step In and pre
vent the supplies from going Into the
hands of the Standard Oil company,
which at present controls the Ca
nadian oil market.
MISS DOROTIiY PAR
DEE IS MARRIED.
Hazleton, Pa., Jan. 12. The mar
riage took place here today of Miss
Dorothy Pardee, eldest daughter of
Frank Pardee, the coal operator, and
Harold Benjamin Clarge, of New
York. Miss Pardee and Mr. Clarke
are well known in New York society.
The brides grandfather was the
founder of this city and a pioneer
operator in the anthracite fields.
Stelter.
St. LouK Jan. 12. Spelter steady,
S6. 6506.70.
HAD A PEAK AT
BUT ANDREW MADE HIM PROM-1
1SE HE WOULDN'T TELL i
DISPOSAL OF A BILLION.
E. M. BIGELOW.
Special Correspondence.
Pittsburg, Jan. 12. What is An
drew Carnegie going to do with his
fortune of nearly one billion dollars
when he dies?
Edward M. Bigclow knows, but he
won't tell.
Mr. Blgelow recently returned from
a trip to New York, where he had
a heart-to-heart talk with the laird
of Sklbo. Mr. Blgelow, who was for
merly a director of public works of
Pittsburg and who has done more
than any one else in providing the
city beautiful parks, has been close
to Mr. Carnegie for years.
Mr. Carnegie introduced the sub
ject of the disposal of his fortune
after he was gone. He showed Mr.
Bigelow his will, which has been
drawn recently, but pledged him not
to reveal any of Its contents until
he Is dead.
That the provisions of the docu
ment are unique and that it pro
vides for the expenditure of many
millions for philanthropic purposes Is
admitted by Mr. Blgelow. Pittsburg,
upon which Mr. Carnegie has already
spent something over I20.000.0UO,
omes in for another big slice.
During the course of the conver
sation Mr. Blgelow uid Mr. Car-
Ill GRAY
WIS
ORDER
L
OF THE POPE
Hope of Any Harmonious Ac
Hon Between the Govern
ment and Catholicism.
IRELAND Will PROBABLY
BE MADE JOT CARDINAL
Report on Russian Terrorists Gives
Them Credit For Appalling Loss
of Life Among Opponents.
Paris, Jan. 12. The encyclical is
sued yesterday by the Pope seeming
ly puts an end to the hopes of the
moderates of all shades of opinion
that the church eventually would
accommodate itself to the new condi
tions In France. There la not the
faintest suggestion that the French
bishops will not obey the orders from
Home.
The consequences are likely to be
deplorable from every point of view.
The majority of the clergy and the
Catholics generally recognixe that
practically there Is no chance for the
church to emerge victorious from
the struggle. On the contrary, the
lot of the church will be harder. Even
Juarez, the socialist leader, refers re
gretfully to the consequences which
the papal encyclical will entail. He
says: "The Pope desires to save dog
ma and hierarchy. In reality he Is
preparing their ruin. Attlla was the
scourge of God; Pius X is the scourge
of the church."
XEW CARDINAL ANNOUNCED
IX)R UNITED STATES
Rome, Jan. 12. It has been an
nminAcil nn Authorttv here todav that
the encyclical or rope iieo against
Americanism was written by C'arat
nal Gibbons, who, thinking it was
Inspired bv Cardinal Rampollo Joined
Iho Aimtrinn and German cardinals in
defeating Ramnollo at the last con
clave. It is also stated on high au
thority that Archbishop Ireland will
be made a cardinal.
OFFICIAL REI'ORT ON
RUSSIAN TERRORISTS
St. Petersburg, Bus., Jan. 12. The
Temps today in Its official Issue pub
lished the fallowing appalling statis
tics respecting the murderous opera
tion of the terrorists from February
1905, to Dec. 31, 1906. During this
period the following persons were
either killed or dangerously injured
by dagger, revolver or bomb, viz.:
Governors general and governors of
towns, 67; prefects of police and oth
er officers of the force, 372; police
men, 34"; officers of the Gendarmle,
47; officers of the army of the Im
perial guard. 124; soldiers, 382; civic
functionaries of various ranks, 215
clergyman, 55; members of commer
clal Institutions, 68; land owners
and manufacturers, 117, and bankers
and merchants, 72. During the same
period the number of ordinary per
sons, peasants workmen and etc.
killed or wounded by the terrorist
reached the enormous total of 32,
706.
NEW YORK INSURANCE
REFORMS IN FORCE,
New York, Jan. 12. The insurance
reforms secured by the Armstrong
committee of the legislature come
Into effect today. For this year and
' hereafter no company will be allow
ed to write more than 1150,000.000
worth of business a year; agents com
missions will be reduced at least one
fourth; every new policy must con
tain the full contract under which
the holder and insurer alike are
bound, and no more deferred divided
policies can be Issued. Besides the
main reforms several other but less
drastic changes go into effect.
Metal Market.
New York, Jan. 12. Copper
lead unchanged.
and
CARNEGIE WILL
E. M. BIGELOW.
negie remarked, "Yes, here I ua will
ing to give more millions to Pitts
burg, but they don't have the brains
to use it." Mr. Blgelow took It that
the eteel king meant that PitUburg
ers do not carry out his plan4 th
way he wants them. "
YCU
POSTPONES
ANOTHER ROW OVER
JTS I
I
CHAIRMAN SHONTS.
SEVENTH ANNUAL AUTO
SHOW OPENED IN
THE SQUARE
Altogether New and Novel
Decorative Scheme Greet
ed Assembled Throngs.
SHOW IS ONE OF GREAT
SOCIETY EVENTS OF DAY
New York, Jan. 12. An utterly
new precedent for superb decorative
schemes was set today when the
doors of the Madison ivquara Garden
opened for the seventh annual Nation
al Automobile show, which will re
main open until the night of the
19th. Not even at the automobile
salon at Paris, or in any foreign cap!
tal, has there ever been attempted
anything like such an elaborate and
artistic creation for a show. More
than $50,000 has been spent In pre
paring, the setting for the exhibits
with the result that the Interior of
the garden presents a scene of dazzl
4 I.'.. .. .. i .. k rut. i . . i
privileged to' Bee some details of the
preparations were astouned at their
scope even through forewarned by
the general statement about grand
eur and expense, it la almost ua
belleveable that so much elaboration
ever would bo entered upon for an
automobile show; it was more on
the scale of preparations for the
receptions of some national hero
such as that given in this city for
Admiral Dewey on his return from
the Philippines. The motor cars
have attracted their usual following
of the public but apart from them
the scenic surroundings are worth
a long trip to every lover of a gorge
ous spectacle. The coloring Is so varied
and harmoniously distributed as to
elude description In black and white,
but some Idea of the ensemble can be
had by those who can picture a
palatini Swiss garden In the late
fall or early winter. Beneath an
amber sky, spangled with pale sil
very stars blink a good night to the
sinking sun, or the mellow and
flaming glories of autumnel foliage
are playing hide and seek about
rustic arbors, and the coloring Is re
flected upon pure white Btatuary and
in plushing fountains; the green
sward of the garden Is delicately
flecked in white by the first desultory
flakes of ii snow furry sent to tell
that winter Is at hand. In the per
spective, on all sides. Is Alpine scen
ery with hamlets snuggling between
snowy peaks and mountain lakes
gleaming In the lingering, refracted
rays of the sunset hour. Last year
the decorative plan was to represent
an Italian garden In summer time,
with classic cornices about and a
color scheme of white and gold.
That was tine, but very cheap com
pared with todays exhibition. For
todays show more than $0,000 were
expended alone in getting good de
signs and according to Mr. Bell, the
official decorator, who made a tour
through Europe the lutest ideas have
been adopted. Overland, the iron
girders of the big showhouse are
concealed by a canopy of amber hue,
straded with 37,000 silver stars. The
whole floor is covered with a special
ly woven green carpet, with streaks
and dots here and there to carry out
the snow motif. The side walls of
the main floor and platform ore con
cealed by paintings designed to per
fect the illusion of an Alpine per
spective, and at the Fourth avenue
end there is a huge canvass painted
by a well known scenic artist de
picting a mid-winter scene. In front
of the pillars which support the gal
leries there are heroic statues on
pedestals, eight on each side. One
figure represents the "Goddess of the
Show," another Is a winged mercury
designed in Paris. These two figures
are posed alternately along the
sides. At either end of the bund
stand is another heroic figure repre
senting "Triumph." Near the Madi
son avenue entrance Is a great foun
tain, twenty feet across the base and
eight feet in height. It has three
basins and Its several Jets are Illumi
nated by various colored lights. The
spirit of the fountain Is a nympn,
holding a dolphin, and on the rim
of the buttl are sea urchins pouring
lihallons from water vessels held In
their hands. On each side tit the
fountain are allegorical statues of
heroic size having a background of
natural plants and foliage, 'his
fountain Is a piece of work worthy
of permanency for It contains some
of the best thought of the urtlst who
designed It. Stretching down through
the centre of the garden, over the
snow flecked verdure Is a rustic ar
bor made of white birch. It is in
tertwined with autumn foils ith
-' , , -?
THE PANAMA CANAL
CHYIHMAN SHONTS AM) CHIEF
ENGINEER STEVENS (HTAHHEL
OVER AUTHORITY- AM) BOTH
HOT FOOTED IT TO THE WHITE
HOlisE STEVENS USED - HOT
IANtiUAiE TO SHONTS AND
NOW IT'S UP TO ONE OF TUB,
TWO TO REKION ROOSEVELT
TRIED TO SMOOTH IT OVER.
--
, -. , - i
Special Correspondence.
Washington, D. C, Jan. 1 2. There
Is another row on In Panama canal
circles. ;
The rumpus is between the chair
man of the canal commission and the
chief engineer, and It may lead to
the resignation of Chairman Theo.
Shonts or of Engineer John F. Ste
vens. At present the two are work
ing together under a truce patched
up by President Rooserelt.
Matters did not come to on open
rupture until Immediately after j
President Roosevelt's departure from j
the strip. It will be recalled that the
president's visit was followed by
some reforms In the way of a reor
ganisation of some of the depart
ments and a straightening out of
several questions of - Jurisdiction.
Briefly stated .what the president did
was to divide all the canal adminis
tration Into seven executive depart
ments, and to order that all these de
partments report directly to Mr.
Shonts, who. In addition, was given
the authority to hire or fire in them.
The effect of this was to reduce the
chief engineer, from being second in
xuthorlty to the chairman, to a plane
with seven other department chiefs.
He had formerly been in supreme
control of all canal work matters In
the absence of Chairman Shonts, and
when the latter was on the strip was
his chief lieutenant. The new order
stripped him of all these extraordi
nary powers.
In company with six other officials
he was presented on the day of the
president's departure with a general
order from the chairman defining
Just what his authority would in the
future be.
The story of whnt occurred has
Just reached Washington. There was
an Interview between Stevens and
Shonts which recalls the historic In
terview between Taft and Wallace.
The chief difference was that Stevens
used the strong language.
"Damned Incompetents was a
term applied to Borne of Mr. Shonts'
assistants and staff. ' As for taking
orders from them and having to
have his work subjected - to them,
Mr. Stevens would havu none of it.
and said so plainly. . . - '
Mr. Shonts and Mr. Stevens trav
eled Immediately to the states. But
they traveled by different boats. Mr.
Shonts had the president's ear first
Then Stevens had an Interview.
Just what occurred at the White
House is not known. It Is under
stood thnt Mr. Stevens tendered his
resignation, telling the president
that he did not propose to be respon
Bible for work whicli he did not have
a. free hnnd to perform. It Is said
that Mr. Stevens recalled to Presl
dent Roosevelt certain promises which
' the latter had made to him when he
'took the position as successor to Wal-
lace, promises that he should not be
hampered by unnecessary rea tape,
and that he should have all tne au
' thorlty needed to carry on the work
with energy and expedition.
All that is known as to the presl
lint's talk Is the result. Mr. Ste
vens nromised to go back to the Isth
mus and give the new system a trial.
All the same Mr. Stevens Is known
to be in a resignation mood, and his
relations with his nominal chief.
Chairman Shonts, are not cordial. At
this distance it looks as If one or otn
er would have to go.
REPORT ON DAIRY PRO
DUCTS !' WASHINGTON
Olvmola. Jan. 12 State Dairy
and Food Inspector L. Davies In his
report published today states that an
uggregate value of $5,000,000 was the
output of the dairy industries of the
state for the past year but this does
not include the output of 155 cream
eries for 1906 the re ports from which
have not yet been received. Butter
manufactured In the state during the
past year aggregated 8,000,000
pounds,, an increaso of about 400,000
pounds over the previous year, but
reports from creameries have yet to
come and Inspector Davies calculates
that the total will amount to 9,500,
000 pounds. In the last two years
condensed milk valued at $1,000,000
was shipped from Puget Sound and
$600,000 worth from Alaska, but as
yet the industry is only In its infancy.
vari-colored electric bulbs sclnlilallng
among it. The sturways from the
floor to the elevated platform are
also of rustic work and several car
loads of white birch were brought
from the Adrondacks and the Maine
forests for the work. Tho central
rustic tower is a masterpiece, in that
It combines the maximum of attrac
tiveness with the minimum exac
tions upon the valuable floor spate.
The arbor has a sloping roof that Is
supported solely by pillars rising to
the peak and at the ground the pil
lars are the stanchions of rustic
seats. The general picture Is not
marred by any visible railings as
those on the elevated platform are
concealed by artx noveau paintings.
Introduced so as not to have too
much mountain scenery. In all 36,
000 yards of draperies are used The
exhibits outnumber those at any pre
vious exhibition of the kind In the
world. All the known makers are
represented. Society has turned out
and fashionable New Vorlc in assist
ing In making the ."how u success
Among tlie foreign exhibits are the
winning Darracq Fiat, De Dietrich,
Hotchkiss and Clement Bayard The
American Automobile company exhi
bit Tracy's car. u Thomas Haynes,
Pope. Toledo and Oldsmobile. All
kinds of fittings, oil, appurtenances
and clothing neceary for onrs of
autoa are on view.
Pfe ,
Hi.., II
CHIEF ENGINEER STEVENS.
RECLAMATION MATTERS
BROUGHT BEFORE
CONGRESS
President . AsKs S2.000.000
to Turn Back Colorado
River to Channel.
NOMINATIONS FOR THE
PUEBLO LAND OFFICE
Special to The Evening CUIsien.
Washington, V). C, Jan. 12. H. B,
Holt, prominent politician of south
ern New Mexico, and who Is a candi
date for the speakership of the next
New Mexican legislative house, Is In
the city. He and Delegate Andrew:
visited tho different departments to
day. The diversion dam of the Ele
phant Butte project and other mat
ters of the reclamation service wercj
before the house today.
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE ON
COIiORAlM) RIVER BREAK
Washington, Jan. 12., The presl
dent today sent to the senate a me
sage urging some action by congress
towards remedying the situation
caused by the break in the Colorado
river four miles below the interna
tlonal line ' In Mexico, and which
threatens property interests tu the
Imperial valley of California. The
message contains a long review of
the situation and says that prompt
action must be taken, otherwise con
dltlons will become so extreme as to
bo impracticable of remedy. He es
timntes that for $2,000,000 the rlvc
can be restored to Its former than
nel. The question of whut sum, I
any, should be paid by the Souther:
Pacific for work done since Novein
ber 4th Is one for future consldera
tion. Referring to the California
Development company, he said th
United States should acquire Its right
and its Irrigation project should bo
carried out by the reclamation serv
Ice.
S M I : I'ltl sSI DENTIAL
NOMINATIONS ARE MADI
Washington, Jan. 12. The presl
clent today sent to the senate the fol
lowing nominations:
Assistant secretary of the treasury
Arthur r . Stater, of Washington.
Register of the land office
Pueblo, Colo., Samuel Abbey.
Receiver of public moneys at Pu
eblo, Colo., John J. Lambert.
CITY DIRECTORY IS
JADLY NEEEDED
THE EVEMXO CITIZEN WILL
MMN filVK THE CITY A FIRST
CLASS DIRECTORY.
trrttun ttt
The Evening Citizen will, In a
very short time, start canvaas-
ers out to secure names for a 4
new city directory, which Is bad- 4
ly needed, as the last one pub- Y
lished by an outfit not familiar '
with the city, was the poorest
excuse of a city directory ever t
Issued In Albuquerque, und many
names of prominent citizens f
were omitted altogether.
It Is the intention of The
Evening Citizen to make the if
next city directory, the very best t
ever published, and when com- t
pleted it will prove one of the f
best advertisements for the city f
Imaginable. 4'
The book will contain Ulus-
trated, write-ups of the city, t
railroad shops, lumber mills, 4
churches, university, schools and 4
all other important enterprises, 4
besides advertisements and a 4
complete directory of names 4
from A to 2. 4
A section of the book will also
lie devoted to u directory of Old 4
Albuquerque, and the many
points of interest of the "old
berg" will be Illustrated with up- 4
propriate half-tone cuts. 4
The Evening Citizen, with the 4
exception of the year 1905, when 4
an impostor by the name of 4
Ives stepped in and got out a 4
poor excuse of a city directory,
has published every directory 4
tliiH city has ever had, and they
have been credits both to this
office and the canvassers em- 4
ployed in gathering names and 4
(J itcs for write-ups. 4
Proper b)anks will be printed e
in a few days, and canvassers
Mill no doubt be set to work on 4
February 1, possibly sooner 4
n i r 1 1 r i 1 1 1 t v t t
BIDS
ARE OPENED
AT
Greatest Enterprise of All
Modern Times. Says
Shontz.
DEMOCRATS FAVOR CHAMP
CLRRK ASJHEIR LEADER
Revenue Commissioner Yerkes
Denies He Is Unfavorable to De
natured Alcohol Production.
Washington, D. C, Jan. 12. The
Isthmian Canal commission today
will open , bids of private contractors
for the completion of the Panama
canal. In the opinion, of Chairman
Shonts, It is the greatest task of mod
ern times and is in the highest degree
exceptional in the magnitude and
complexity of the enterprise. The
basis on which the contract will be
awarded Is the per centage of cost
for completing the work.
Bidders are required to accompany
their proposals with a certified check
of 1200,000, and the successful bidder
Is required to give bond in the sum
of $2,000,000 to protect the govern
ment from losses. The government
expressly reserves to itself the con
trol of sanitation, of engineering and
of the department of subsistence and
quarters, as they are directly con
nected with the henlth and well be
ing of the canal employes. The right
of rigid supervision Is also retained.
"In no event, said Shonts, "enn
any contractor be allowed to make
these departments an Independent
source of profit."
Only Four Bids Made.
W. J. Oliver of Nashville, Tenn.,
and Anson M. Bangs of New York,
associated together, were the lowest
bidders for the construction of the
canal. Proposed work for 6.75 per
centum upon estimated cost. Four
proposals only were received. The
others bids were 7.19 per centum by
George Pierce & Co,; 12.5 per centum
by the Macrthur Gillespie company,
28 ner cel'itum bv the North Ameri
can Dredging Company. Oliver &
Bangs, the lowest bidders, have had
much experience In contracting work.
Oliver la one of the largest railroad
contractors in America and at pres
ent Is engaged In tunneling Lookout
Mountain and other extensive works.
Bangs was contractor for the Soo
Canal locks.
CHAMP CLARK WILL TAKE
LEADERSHIP FROM WILLIAMS
Chicago, Jan. 12. A dispatch to
the Tribune from Washington, says:
There Is to be a great revolution
in the democratic political campaign.
Pledges have been given which insure
the election of Champ Clark of Mis
souri as democratic leader In the
house and the party candidate for
speaker in the place of John Sharp
Williams of Mississippi, the present
leader.
The friends of Williams do not yet
give up the fight but there Is every
reason to believe that pledges for
Clark now constitute a clear majority
of the caucus. The change Is of lm
portance because It involves a great
deal In the way of presidential poll
tics, as a democratic leader Is not to
be chosen until next December, or the
beginning of the campnlgn for noml
nation to the next presidential con
ventlon.
YEltKES SAY'S HE IS NOT
AOANST CHEAP ALCOHOL
Superior, Wis., Jan. 12. The Tele
gram today prints a report by Com
mlssloner of Internal Revenue Terk-
m , . 1 I .
es, made Dy request oi i resiueui
Roosevelt, as a result of allegations
that newspaper had made against
the Yerkes department. The pnper
charged that Yerkes opposed the en
actment of the law permitting the dls
tilling of denatured alcohol and that
the law was Impracticable because it
compelled the distiller to produce at
least 500 gallons a day. In his re
Dort to the president, Yerkes contra
dieted both assertions. He declared
that a still may produce live gallons
or live mousanu anu uemes inning
attempted to head-off the legislation
in question.
CITRl'S CROP EXPECTED
TO BE RECORD BREAKER.
San Francisco, Jan. 12. The actual
shipments of oranges for the past
season from Southern California were
22.175 cars, and 3,788 cars of lemons.
This season the lemon crop promises
to be larger than last year, but re
ports from the orange groves are
rather conflicting but it is safe to
state that all round the crop will
show a falling off of fifteen per cent.
RECORD IMMIGRATION
TO BOSTON PORT.
Boston. Mass., Jan. 12. No less
than 12,859 Immigrants landed at this
port during the past year. The fig
ures relate exclusively to aliens ar
riving from trans-Atlantic ports and
show that Italians lead all others
with a total of 17.049. Scandanavians
follow with 1 1.476, and Irish with
9,280. Only 12 Chinese and 9 Japa
nese came here seeking homes.
TYPHOID F.PEDEMIC
IX PENNSYLVANIA
Scranton, Pa., Jan. 12. There are
now 80(1 cases of typhoid fever here.
The death only number ten. Mayor
Dimick has made a personal inspec
tion of the poorer quarters where)
the epedemic exixts and states
that
he found a deplorable condition in
certain densely occupied places. All
steps are being taken by the authori
ties to Mlamp out the disease which
is said to have originate. 1 fr.mi the
uv of Impure water
CAPITAL
TILLMAN ON
BROWNSVILLE
NEGRO RIOT
South Carolina Senator Makes
Characteristic Speech to
Crowded Senate.
CHARGES PRESIDENT WITH
BAD CONDITION OF RACES
Announces Race War Imminent
and Gives His Slogan For
Whiteman's Country.
Washington. Jan. U. The
nouncement that Senator Tillman
to speak on the Brownsville affair,
today, early crowded the galleries
and corridors of the senate. It wmm
nearly 1 o'clock when the senate fin
ally finished the morning business an
the matter was taken up. Many mem
bers of the house were In the cham
ber and every possible space was oc
cupied when Tillman made hla ad
dress. Sicecli Wae Characteristic,
Senator Tillman spoke upon the
Brownsville Incident In the senate
today. He characterized the pre -detnt's
action In the matter aa "noth
ing more nor less than lynching-.
He challenged any one to produce
in either army regulations or the ar
ticles of war any foundation for the
chmrge of conspiracy of silence, mu
tiny and treason as made against the
soldiers, although he declared there
was no doubt that the soldiers were
responsible for the "outrage at
Brownsville." Tillman held that ft
Is contrary to the fundamental prin
ciples of liberty of the English and
American law that the Innocent
should suffer because of the slna of
the guilty. He also declared that '
every man shall be considered Inno
cent until proven guilty. , .
"In this case," he said, "167 men
have been punished, while not more
than twenty have been charged with
participation In crime." He main
tained that the negro troops should"
not have been sent to Texas.
Holds President Responsible.
After condemning Major' Penrose
and Captain Macklln for alleged grosn
negligence and Incompetence, Ttlftran
declared that the race question til ct
the bottom of the whole trouble., II
Insisted that the president Is primar
ily more responsible than any other
man for the position the negroes of
the south have taken on the question
of negro rights. He gave recognition '
to Booker T. Washington in a social
way. He did It, knowing he was
(lying In the face of caste feeling
among 17,000.000 of southern white
and against the same feeling of two
thirds or three-fourths of the north
ern people. He understands neither
negro nor the deep and vital charac
ter of the Issue Involved.
The attitude of the administration
In this social question has been the
cause of a great and notable chanr
In the demeanor of the negros
throughout the south and the great -r
question of relationship between the
races cannot much longer be kipt
down.
Announce His Slogan.
Tillman predicted In the near fu
ture a race conflict. In the sou'h
and In Cuba the question Is whether
the whites or the negroes shall pre
vail. On the Pacific coast the rela
tionship between Mongolian and
high time that something shall b
high time 'that somethang shall be
done to have this great and vital
question brought before the country
In some sensible way. For himself,
he was ready to go to battle under
the slogan of "Amerioto for Ameri
cans, and this Is n white man's coun
try, and the white man must govern
It."
tlO.OCMt.OOO ADDITIONAL
FAMILIES HEOI'IHED.
Washington, Jan. 12. Statistics
published by the board of agricul
ture today show that there are ap
proximately 600,000.000 acres of pub
lic land yet to be tenanted and the
board" has proclaimed its judgment
that with rapid farming five acres of
the fertile unoccupied land are suffi
cient to support an average sized
family. This would mean homes for
60,000,000 more families than there
are now lit the country or about 240.-
000,000 individuals which would
swell the population to three times Its
present extent.
TEXAS HOI SE HOLDS i K.III'
HOl'lt DERATE ON B All. FY
Austin, Texas, Jun. 12. At ll
o'clock today the lower house of leg
islation stalled upon an eight-hour
discussion whether Senator Bailey
should be Investigated by the com
mittee or the house In a body, as to
his alleged connection with the Wu-ters-Iierce
oil company. The two
factions agreed that each side should
have four hours' time, ami at the ex-
j piratlon of that tiifle the vole should
ue laseii. Adjournment will prooaoiy
occur before the debate is concluded.
Till
BRAZILIAN tori I I :
CROP I N'CREASl N.
New Yoik. Jan 12. Figures pub
lished today tiiou that the recent
valorization Miieme Is gradually In
creasing coffee shipments from Brasil
to this country. Ill November lld.-
3H6.2UK pouml cre imported, the
value being f 1 iM 1 2 tili"
The l big
baiikinK
houses ill this city hicii
noweo iiien
confidence in I'r.iiil-t
scheme for c oft , v al u nation b
advancing the I'Mii of IJ.oart.Oiia !
tile KoVerilinelll ot tile .-lite of M
I'aulo today state, tliaf no public oi -feting
of the loan wiU he mJ.

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