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Albuquerque citizen. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1907-1909, October 02, 1908, Image 2

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rAOK TWO.
ALnTJQTJBTtQTTB CITTZTOT.
Si
THE ALBUQUERQUE CUUEN
Beautiful Youn English Actress
Forsakes Footlights tor Title
PUBLISHED DAILY AND WEEKLY
M. IVioofe Realty Co.
1
By the Citizen Publishing Company of Albuquerque, New Mexico.
ESTABLISHED 1886
W . STKILKLbK
iSIDENT
WILLIAM F. BROGAN
lone
219 West Gold Are.
MANAGING EDITOR
: ,
. , it
I f t innn
- .
srasciumox iiates.
year by mall In advance $5.00
vtonth by nia!
tmmut ttj carrier wMliln city limit eo
anwrd m necntMl-rlaMs matter at the mntoffle of Albuquerque. N. M.,
ui lAmfresa 01 Mirni 8, 1H7V.
ttm only lllnstratrd dally neuiaMr In New Mexico and the bn ad-
auniing metuum of uie Southwest.
nu i4rgi-KiigrE itizkn is:
t bm leading Ciulli-nn lnll.r and weekly newicr of IIn Southwest.
Tfto atlvocste of lt-pulllcau principle ami Ote "Hjuare Ileal."
AXiHrQlT.IQI E CITIZEN HAS:
Tte fliieMt equipped Job department In New Mexico.
The latent report hj Axmrlated lre and Auxiliary Newn Serrlce,
"WE GET THE NEWS FIltST."
STATEHOOD FOR NFW MEXICO"
W ravor the immediate adml.ion of the territories of New Mexico ana
nit) a separate states In the Union. Republican National Platform.
3fie guarantee SFcCfy
One of the strongest aidumcnts apnlnnt the puirnnt'e of lhank deposit
which Air. Bryan has Ijein bo asaiiliously advocating, appears In a recent
Issue of the Denver Republican.
The proposition Ices Its political significance and becomes purely a
question of business, when Its results are shown as plainly as the Itepub
Ifcan'B editorial ruts them. The editorial is as follows:
The more the proposition to guarantee bank deposits U studied the
more clearly appears Its folly and the tpernlclous results which would flow
from Its adoption. '
In a recent address delivered In Bennington, Vermont, Congressman E.
J. Hill of Connecticut presented certain figures showing the burden which
would be csst upon the banks of Connecticut and Vermont If the proposed
law should be enacted and enforced. In the course of his remarks he said:
"By concurrent reports the total deposits In all banks In the United
States were 1 3,74 2.374,1 81.
"The assessment of 1-8 of one per cent would make $17,177,967, or
somewhat In excess of the $15 000.000 guarantee fund.
"The amount which Connecticut would be required to pay would be
418,547. dfvlded as follows: National banks, $72 323; state banks, $10,
193; trust companies, $24,967: tavlngs banks, $320,465.
"That would Connecticut get In return for this great sum of $428,547.
Ehe would have the entire amount of losses to depositors in her failed
banks last year made good to them. How much was that? Not one cent.
How much the year before? Nothing. How much for the past ton years?
Nothing for natUnal banks nothing for state banks, nothing for trust
companies, and only $31,387 70-100 for saving banks; so. that, if this
nr!, , . r. n plan had been In effect for the past ti n years, assuming
i"- ge 0f deposits as last year, Connecticut banks would have
5,547 and their depositors would have gotten back 131
e would, however, have had the privilege of helping to make
to the depositors of the speculative banks and stock gam-
panles of Wall street, and numerous other similar lnstltu-
jarts of the country.
vould have paid Into "".e pool last year $90,351, and received
i luve been able nlnce . ave been here to go back but four
.. i t lning her los-es t 'epositors. For that period It was noth
ing. . The j. unt you woufd a ive paid meanwhile, would have been
141 404."
'T'.ir fai't if at In forty years the losses to depositors In National banks
United States have amounted to only 1-26 of one per cent
ice of the necillessneas of the proposed guarantee so far as
tind are concerned, and yet would have to ipay Into the
1-8 of one iper cent per annum of their deposits. At a
oe seen what a heavy and unjust burden would thus be
m, compared with any benefit their depositors would re-
' '-1 i . '
giO'l ti. :
'blin? tru.-i t
lion. III Olti'.
"Wrrr.ort
f.;v :,.hvj, .
in ''...-..V-r cv'i
1tk: , ! t i
Ma--! o;
c t
s additional expense, they would have to raise their Inter
' te ipeople doing business with them would have to pay this
iwers from conservative banks weuld have to pay this
I '' :harge solely because of the losses occurring In banks not
sx cuirei.m,...y and prudently managed. The wrong and Injustice of this
must be evident t every one: and the Injurious effect upon business in
terests and investments would be unavoidable.
tfruti Versus Bunccmfte
The Democratic declaration In favor of Independent for the Philip
pine Islands Is so qualified by the condition "as soon as a stable govern
ment can be established" as to be without any binding erect upon the
party or Its representatives, and this was probably the purpose V so wording-
the plank In question. The population of the Philippines Is made up
of different and discordant races. Even the Spaniards, who held title to
the islands for more than three hundred years, wgre far from being mas
ters of all the territory nominally subjeet to their control, and they never
succeeded In establishing "a stable government" In the four years which
William H. Taft devoted to the. Philippines he did lmmeasurably"more for
olv4llEation than the Spaniard had accomplish, In nearly that number
of oenttries. lie wan successful in his greast task because he labored to
kelp the Filipinos, not to exploit them, a reversal of their experience of
agea Undoubtedly, if the Filipinos were rreparej for independenc, Wil
liam H. Taft would be first to welcoaie them to the family of nations, but
they are not. and the Bryanlte demand for letting them go "as son as a
staple government can be e-tabllshed" Is simply the vols of the Shallow
demagogue, seeking to carry an aud'ence with hlai by recklessly crying for
ua-iethlng that, be thinks, win catch the fancy of his hearers, and at the
aaaue time invoKe no responsibility for himself.
Mr. Taft placed the Philippine problem in its true light when he said
to a committee of Congress: "We are in lh Philippine to discharge the
highest duty that one nation can owe j another people. Self
government does not come by nature t mut be taught even to tie edu
cated who are used to a different wywem. It seems to us that tfte self-re-tralnt
and sense of rf sponslbllity necessary t. carry out successfully the
principle of free civil government can be learned by the educated as well
as the lenorant. by the practice of It in soelatin witH Americans who
understand ilie self-restraint neces-wry before self-government U possible."
Whew! Tekegi'apJiie dn-patches from'tbe ever changing scene of the
(political warfare dwlaue that Mr. Hryan Is "arinlnf up" as the campaign
advances, it h4 n t been noticed to any extent tiiat lw has been at all
c'W evnr since the campaign Btarted but if he ha been and 1 only warm
ing 114 now, he will certa.rfly b sizzling some by the time the campaign
tn 4a1n
Hfce jesent rampa'-gn will g; down In history probably as Wing fam-
ous, fur its 'rer'He." from ene prominent political personage ti another.
The sta;e has been reached now where a rei'ly t a rt-i".y has scarcely had
time to ooel off before it is replied to. o sw f:ly are the replies following
arh other than tt's hard work to determine whUh reply Is th,e reply to the
one that ralle 1 forth a reply.
$3,000
bargain.
Fr ' rWiV u zzzz
S I $6,000
j4 "V Ar rr- II a
nflililili$Ms jvl 2m
II nr -7" t . :a' a, .. T . W Wl w J. t t eJ I mB
c
Butineit property. Brick buildings. Rent for $60 per oontM
1 & percent o investment. Good location for rapid increase mvalu
Suburban Prtroertv.
r J wv- wb A Will m Fsi a vfaw vasvs a sVW
acreage lots with shade and choice fruit trees. Fine garden land.
$900 00 frf RESIDNCE L0TS in besl Iocal'n. in, Corner, ?ast
$5,000
$5,200
A Corner Business Lot. Will sell ;for twice the price inside of tyo
years.
LI
160 acres of fine land near the Universitv. Valuable imnrovuM
ments on the property with plenty of water, .hade and fruit ti'ji '
ncf InratSnn for SanitAi iiima anifokl I... f ..ti & i. . l. V' .
- s ""'; 'ay uii in small trecis or in ioiv v
an aaauion to me city.
A corner lot with two story building First floor bu iness. Second
story rooming house, 18 rooms. Half cash. .
LADY FOULETT.
London, Oct. 2. Actresses continue
to marry Into the nobility, dlv dint,
honors with the daughters of multi
millionaire Americans in this respeci.
Within the last few months slxte. n
beautiful young women from the
London theaters have .secured peers 01
wealthy young men of the exclusive
cl:i.--s as husbands.
The latest mutch Is that betwec n
Miss Sylvia Storey of the Oayety the
ater to Karl Poulett. The bride Is tile
granddaughter of O. H. Storey, it. A.,
an aetor of distinction and a. ho a
prominent p:rnter In oIN.
The till' il husband has had an ad
ventur oik c .truer. Among cither thinss
he Ini l tile lion r oT being "rustlcnt
ed" from Dxford. During hi.s ml
norlty hi' was threatened with the loss
of his title and estates, to which
cla'm was bild by an organ grinder.
JAPANPREPARES
BIG WELCOME
Among the various unfleasant things In the atmoph. re the days Is
tie odor of moth balls. But they bespeak of oil standbys tn the clothing
line which cme in mighty liandy even if th y do n ;t flt fashion's latent
decree.
In addition to the irrigation congrss. an Indnstiial exhibit a Terri
torial fair and some thousanlg of visitors, AlWu'iuercjUe ho has Mr. Hearst.
Wonder If Willy Hearst has sny bonif) shells to explode down this
FOR REET
American Sailors Will be
Treated In F na S vie When
They Reach Yokohoma.
Yokohama, Oct. 2. Although the
dat Bet for the arrival of the Am
erican fleet is still mure than two
weeks distant, the preparations for
the glorious half-mill on dollar cele
bration In honor of the Yankee tars
are about completed. Manufactur-
i of flags and bunting have been
working overtime for the past few
weeks to supply the demand for Am
erican flags, which will be displayed
ide by side with the banner of the
mikado during the stay of the fleet.
The circumstances surrounding the
original dispatch of the American
warships to the raclflc ocean give to
the Japanese visit an especial po
litical significance In the popular eye.
The difficulty In California over the
exclusion of Japanese children from
the schools, the former predominance
of the Japanese fleet In Asiatic wat
ers ahd the unprotected tate of the
western coast all gave color to the
general convlctUn that the fleet was
sent to restore the balance of power
between the two countries, and to
offset tha rapid naval and military
growth of Japan. The extreme cor
diality of the reception In Australia
was generally recognised as due to
the feeling In that country that tho
two English spcoklng races In the Pa
cific, had a common political and
economic cause aeninst the aegres
slve and commercial and Industrial
policy of the new eastern power.
The overcrowding of old Japan and
the tendency of Its citizens to tml
grate to English-speaking countries
where the wages are higher, together
with the unwillingness of those coun
tries to let In labor with a lower
standard if living has made an acute
question which remains to be set
tled. The character of the protec
torate, moreover, which Japan has
maintained over Korea has not tend
ed to conciliate American and Aus
tralian shipping and commercial In
terests. In the fne" V,thls situation the
Japanese have seMittle. smiled much,
as Is their 'Cusio,, and -calmly pre
pared for an entertainment of the
fleet which will coat over $500,000,
and will doubtless furnis.i mora
novelties and surprises than any thwig
to which the men have yet been treat
ed. Every ofneer and man of the
visiting Americans will receive a sil
ver souvenir. Viscount Ita said: "The
coming of the great American fleet
to Japan will be one of the most
striking events In our history. We
must extend to it our most sincere
welcome. It will undoubtedly tend
to bring the nations closer to each
other, and It will likewise prove of
the greateft benefit to both the Jap
anese and American navies. The com
ing of the American fleet Is at our
Invitation, and although It is Im
possible to receive It with the entire
Japanese navy, as many vessels as are
available, should be assembled to pay
our rt'Bpects to the visitors."
The report that the American sail
ors had objected to visiting Japan,
and that they had contemplated
measures to resist orders to that ef
fect has not been confirmed, and is
not generally believed In Japan.
As the American battleships, 16 in
number and headed by the flagship
Connecticut, near the coast of Japan
they will be met by the ves-els of
Japan deployed in such wise that one
Japanese warship will escort each of
le visiting ships. Then, for the first
time, will the best that Uncle Sam's
navy can boast have a chance to
compare visually and at close range
the fleet of its one and only rival In
the Pacific. Put In this case the
rivalry will be one of good offices and
kindly greetings, an art for which the
Japanese are now world famous.
it Chapped Skin.
Chapped skin whether on the hands
or face may be cured in one night
by applying Chamberlain's Salve. It
3 also unequaled for sore nipples,
burns and scalds. For sale by all
druggists.
sss4s44
F. H. Strong
Funeral - Director and Embalmer
Private Ambulance
Ldy
Attendant
Supt. Falrvtew
Santa Barbara
Cemeteries
and
Office Strtnf Block 2nd nd
Copptr Avttue. Telt phoBeti
Oflice 7S, Rfiidtnrt 106.
Curios, Novelties, Souvenirs
Oriental Goods
We carry a splendid line of Indian Curios, Mexi
can Drawnwork, Souvenirs of Albuquerque, and
Chin se and Japanese Art Goods.
And our prices are reasonable
"Ask Your Meighbor."
Near Postofficc SAM KEE 215 s Second
0
ne
Million-
People
Will Soon Call New Mexico "Home"
1 hat w ill mean IOO.cOo for Albuquerque. These
two facts go together; and they are facts.
lots in the Terrace Additioa
will pay Two to Tour Hundred rer cent profit in-.-ide
of five years, at present price;. I am not
trying to sell out this entire addition; don't you
think it.
ECONOMY IN LUMBER
It makes no difference to us whether jour bill of ma
terial be for a chicken coop or the largest building in
the country, we are prepared to furnish the same at
lowest prices. Our lumKer is well seasoned, which
makes it worth 15 per cent more to the building 'than
the lumber you have been buy'ng. Try us.
SUPERIOR LUMBER AND MILL COMPANY
FIRST STREET, South of Viaduct, ALBUQUERQUE, V. M.
Thoroughly
Appetizing i
QUK LUNCII-COUXTER satis
nfies the most critical because
it is 6et with neatness and are
and because we offer a menu
which is thoroughly appetizing.
White Honse Restaurant
ZOO S. Fir it Strut
Here you find the best accom
modations. Drop in and see for
yourself.
s
MONmilfilA TRUST CO.
MLBUQUCRQUm
Mg-ytf MEXICO
Capital (ind surplus, stoo.ooo
IMERES1 ALLOWED ON SAVINGS DEPOSITS
)sassnasXDOsOM
DR. CHAS. A. FRANK
Physician and Surgeon
ROOMS 4 AND 5 HARNETT 11LJX3.
Hours 9 to 1 1 A. M. 2 to 5 P. M. 7 to 8 P, M.
TELEPHONE 1079.
KKJOOsKO000m0C
a "..D RKUIAEL" ESTABLISH T.D
'it', t.
L. B. PUTNEY
THE WHOLESALE GROCER
FLOUR, GRAIN AM PROVISIONS
Csrrlei ths largnst tu1 ntcit
;lv, StiH'W
of H:aii i)riffrlM la
FARM AND FUETOHT WAGONS
RlI KOAl) AVKNLfc.
iLiTtrERgvi.
Ten or Fifteen Thousand Dollars More in Sales and You Will be Do
ing the Talking. I Won't.
M. P. STMMM
CORNER
3rd and Cold
LH. COXi mePJumbto
PLUMBING. HEATING, GAS AND STEAMF1TTIXG
Climax Garden lf'e, guaranteed the most durable,
l.at-est things in I'.nanii l Huthroom Fixtures. . . .
Fhcne 1020 401 West Central Ave.
V
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