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Santa Fe new Mexican. [volume] (Santa Fe, N.M.) 1898-1951, November 12, 1913, Image 1

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NEW
Frj
MEXSCAN
VOL. 50.
3VlJVrl FE NEW MEXICO, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1915.
NO. 233.
j
i
RECENT STORM
WAS RECORD
BREAKER
THE EXTENT OF ITS RAVAGES JUST j
BECOMING KNOWN.-SHIPPING I
ON THE GREAT LAKES DEMOR-j
ALIZED, AND HUNDREDS OF THOU-1
SANDS OF DOLLARS DAMAGE.
THE FULL STORY HAS
NOY BEEN TOLD YET
S Vessels reported lost in recent
storm on Greeat Lakes:
The Regiua, (Freighter).
The Leafield, (Freighter!.
The Nottingham, (Freighter).
The "Plymouth, (Barge).
The James CarrutherB,
(Freighter).
The Charles S. Price, (Freight
er). '
The Argus.
The L. C. Waldo, (Freighter).
The Turret Chief, (Freighter.) X
Lightship No. 82.
Besides many smaller craft
and pleasure boats.
Thirty other vessels are report-
ed aground with only slight dam-
age.
Port Huron, Mich., Nov. 12. As if
to warn other vessels to keep their
distance, Lake Huron today lashed it
self Into a sea so rough it is probable
the country must wait at least another
day before the identity of the over
turned vessel a few miles northeast
of here will be definitely known. The
tug Sport, with a diver aboard, visited
the wreck this afternoon, but the
waves were rolling ten and twelve
feet high and it was impossible for
the diver to get close to the derelict
The revenue cutter Morrill was also
compelled to stand helplessly by. The
diver will be sent out again tomor
row,
The captains of the tug, revenue
ter, and the life saving crew all be
lieve that the wrecked vessel is that
them.
A report from Port Frank this after
noon stated that eight more frozen
bodies were washed ashore there to
day. Message From the Dead.
Buffalo, N. Y., Nov. 12. A message
from the missing lightship No. 82, was
found by searchers among the wreck
age of the craft on the south shore
of Lake Erie today. The message was
written on a piece of wood and read:
"Good-bye, Nellie ship is breaking
up fast. (Signed) Williams."
It Is believed that the message was
written by Captain Hugh M. Williams,
of Manistee, Mich., who was in com
mand of the Bhip.
No bodies have been recovered. -Dead
Bodies and Wreckage.
Goderich, Ont., Nov. 12. Reports
from points along the Canadian shore
of Lake Huron point to a heavy loss
of life and shipping in the recent
storm. Seven bodies from the schoon
er Chas. s. Price have been washed
ashore below Grand Bend. Wreckage
fouund here indicates that the James
Carruthers, the largest Canadian
freighter on the lakes, has beer. lost.
An oar picked up this morning just
outside this harbor . was marked
James Carruthers. Search along the
coast for a mile revealed a rudder
from one of the Caruthere' lifeboats,
part of an oak-finished cabin, pieces
of oak chairs, part of a pilot house
and other portions of the upper works
of a large steamer.
The Carruthers was owned by the
St. Lawrence and Chicago Navigation
company. .
The Chas. S. Price
was a steel I
schooner of 4 901 tons built at Lo-1 "naer which government, tunas ana a constitutionalists not to molest exten- j nor s aay, noiwunsiauamg me gov
ralne, Ohio, and owned by the Mahon- Portion of the reserves of the state as- i sive English and American railroad emors present were not to be honored
ing Steamship company. The bodiefe ! sociations would be deposited. Na- i properties at Tuxpam, which it was re- i from the platform until evening. The
of the crew were washed ashore last I tionally, the central bank would per- j ported one or both factions were ! program for that period called for ad
night , t Grand Bend, which Is on the I form those functions which in indl- j threatening to burn. ! dresses by Covernors Hanna of North
eastern shore of the lake,
Searchers working below Goderich
reported this afternoon the finding of
a life raft and five oars from the
steamer Argus. The boat Is not known
here.
Unidentified Vessel.
Port Huron, Mich., Nov. 12. Al
though many vessel men are firm in
their belief that the steamer which
turned turtle in Lake Huron a few
miles northeast of here during the big
gale is the Regina, of the Merchants'
Transportation company, of Toronto,
others are equally convinced this fore
noon that she is not It is regarded
certain, however, that the Regina
(Continued on Page Four.)
TEN TOWNS DESTROYED offND
SGORFS Klf T FH
U
Lima, Peru, Nov. 12. Ten towns
were destroyed and several hundred
persons killed in an earthquake, which
occurred last Friday in the mountain
ous Peruvian province of Aymarals.
News Kf the disaster reached this city
AGREEMENT NOW IN
SIGHT IN MONEY
MEASURE
SIX DEMOCRATS OF SENATE BANK
ING BILL ASK THE CAUCUS TO
GIVE THEM MORE TIME, AS THEY
HAVE PRACTICALLY REACHED AN
UNDERSTANDING.
HITCHCOCK IS STILL
OUT OF THE FOLD
Washington, D. C, Nov. 12. Mark
I ed progress toward an agreement on
j the administration currency bill by six
of the Democratic members of the sen
jate banking committee resulted in a
request that action by the Democratic
conference called for today be de
layed. The six Democrats, Senator
O'Gorman said, were reaching an
agrement by mutual concessions, and
he said the conference would bo asked
to leave the question to the committee
members In the hope that the bill, in
form approved by the -president, might
be presented to the senate, signed by
the 'six Democratic members at an
eqrly date.
Senator Hitchcock, of Nebraska,
was the only Democratic member of
the committee not in today's confer
ence of committeemen. The other six
Democrats prepared to ask the confer
ence to allow them further time
Senate Democrats in a party caucus
today took up the currency situation
with the p,lan of bringing the adminis
tration bill out of the complex situa
tion which has grown up about it in
the banking committee and putting
the measure on the way to passage in
a form acceptaoie 10 i-resiaeni wu
son. Before the conference met, the
Democrats of the committee confer
red again in an effort to agree on a
report preserving the fundamentals of
the house bill, for which the president
contends, and embodying those recom
mendations agreed on for its perfec
tion.
Senators O'Gorman and Reed went
cut-'Into the committee meeting, but Sen
ator Hitchcock did not attend. A com
promise was effected as between the
" ' inks of the house
voted on by a ma
n committee. The
d to recommend
Bank ownersnip of stock in the re
gional banks was laKen up mit me
administration senators refused to
yield and it was practically agreed jcial purposes.
that the house provision on that point It. was pointed out by some observ
sliould stand. A similar controversy j ers that Mr. Hale's conferences were
arose over control of the banks, but j not necessarily a forerunner of recog
the administration supporters Insisted inition, but might be an important fac
that the house provision be adopted, j tor in determining the future attitude
providing for six directors elected by of the Washington government to
the banks and three appointed by the Ward the constitutionalists.
government. j Mr. Hale probably will report on
Chicago, 111., Nov. 12. Senator New-i the personal characteristics of' Gen
lands of Nevada, raced through Chica-jeral Carranza, whether he has the
go today on his way to Washington. I united support of all constitutionalists
When he left his home state it was I or revolutionists, or whether, if sue
in a desperate endeavor to reach the cessful by arms, he would establish a
national capital in time to attend the provisional government that would
Democratic currency conference to-i
day. Trains did not act right for him
and today he telegraphed Senator
Kern that he had lost the race and
could not be In Washington till to
morrow. In his message to Senator Kern, the j
Nevada statesman asked that the con-!
ference be postponed for a day or
two, "until Democratic senators have j
an opportunity to be present." j
Senator Newlaflds said he was anx-1
ious to present what he called - his
"federal reserve system" an outline of J Rear Admiral Brush ou the battle
whlch he recently telegraphed to Sen j ship Louisiana at Tuxpam reported
ator Owen.
This system calls for a federation
of state and national banks. In each
state as a reserve association, consoli
dating and mobilizing the reserves of
member banks for mutual protection
against bank runs and stringencies. In
addition there would be one federal
reserve bank of which the state re-
serve associations would be members, j
viuuai states wouiu ran on mr kuuo
associations.
METHODIST MISSIONARY
BOARD TO MEET AT BOSTON.
Decatur, 111., Nov. 12. Boston was
v, ',..'' 'inn opnolline with the plan of keeping foreign
place of the missionary board of the I
Mpthi-f Phh Th. nnnal meet,
Methodist church. The annual meet-
i. i ii. u j ha i0) a 1
the Board of Home Missions will beiCentr?' American and European diplo-j
hM in Ununn a. Ih. .....m Hmrt
Tho ninnilHu n ronorol riletrihll. I
tion of missionary funds devoted the I Mexico City Nov. 12.-The federal saloon.
appropriation among the foreign coun- j prison at the post of Tuxpam, m , Former Governor Malco mn R Pat
tries as follows 8 e a Cruz nas asked the 'terson, of Tennessee, said in part:
Pnotorn Aaia t9Q fifl- m..twn ' war department for reinforcements to I "The Anti-Saloon League and I
Asia $242,392; Africa' $50,269: South
America J100.060: Enrone M69.839.
ft F ATfTHfMTAKF night's dispatches from VeraUame desire to destroy the traffic ii
OI JlVfHAC.Cm quoted Arthur c payne the Uqllor and redeem a nation from it
by courier. ! men. ' There are twenty-six Americans
The number of known dead was 120 jn the town, all of whom were report
when the courier left the devastated ed safe up to yesterday afternoon. The
district, but it was -believed several (Jolted States battleship Louisiana
hundred more bodies would be recov-
ered from the wrecked towns. j
REBEL CABINET
! MEETS WITH
HALE
PRESIDENT WILSON'S REPRESENTA
TIVE MEETS WITH CARRANZA AND
HIS ADVISORS AT NOGALES TO
DAYMAY MEAN RECOGNITION OF
CONSTITUTIONALISTS.
JAPAN ALSO WILL
SEND A BATTLESHIP
Nogales, Sonora, Mex., Nov. 12.
William Bayard Hale, President Wil
son's personal representative, went
into conference here just before noon
today with General Venustiano Car
ranza and the entire Mexican constitu
tionalist cabinet.
The conference was held in the
border customs house in which Car
ranza established his capital ou coin
ing here from liermosillo.
Those who met the American rep
resentative with General Carranza
were General Felipe Angeles, minister
of war; Francisco Escttdero, minister
of foreign relations and the treasury;
Ygnacio Bonillas, minister of fomento
and communications, and Rafael 7m
baran Capmany, of the department of
the interior.
Neither Mr. Hale nor General Car
ranza would give au intimation as to
the topics that might come up for dis
cussion, The conference extended far into
the afternoon.
Washington. D. C, Nov. 12. Con
ferences now being held between Will
iam Bayard Hale and General Venus
tiano Carranza at Nogales are inter -
preted in official circles here as the
first open move by the United States
government to show lis interest in the
constitutionalist movement in Mexico.
No officials commented today on
Mr. Hale's exact status, but on a pre
vious occasion, when he spent three
months in Mexico City, gathering in
formation President Wilson let it be
known that Mr. Hale was there as his
personal friend. Hale transmitted re
ports, and took part in conferences
with John Lind and Rear Admiral
Fletcher.
Little -doubt exists in diplomatic
circles that while Mr. Hale still re
tains the character of unofficial en
voy, he is furnishing the Washington
government with information for offi-
-
guarantee a fair and free election,
There is also a possibility that the I
information he gathers may be useful I
to the state department in its dealings ,
with foreign diplomats here. The dip-
lomatic corps in Mexico City is said
to be at a disadvantage in making re- j
ports on the constitutionalists as its
only source of information there is
the Huerta government. j
There was no indications here today j
as to future steps in the American :
policy. j
to the navy department today there
was no immediate need of protection
to American property In that vicinity.
He has assured Consul Payne that the j
Louisiana will afford asylum for
Americans and other foreigners. For )
the present the Louisiana will remain
at Tuxpam.
Late today Secretary Bryan warned
both the Huerta government and the j
iate touay secretary Brvan went i
Into conference with several diplo-! Former Governor Malcom R. Pat
i matic representatives of South Amer-! terson, of Tennessee, was the prin-
ican nations. No announcement of : cipal speaker at the afternoon ses
j the purposes of the conferences was sion.
! made, but It was understood to be in Twice elected governor of Tennes-
nations advise d of developments of
he Pollc' of tl,e United States to-
,r " . . .. """" " t
waru Mexico, ijiice conrerence wun
""H,B "AVK uceu uem-
Cannot Help Tuxpam.
defend th city against the attack, be-1
,ns mane oy a strong iorce or reDets ,
The !
jcomumuueu uy v auuiuo Aguuar,
; garrison numbers only 250 men. The
w-ar department replied that the rein
forcements were unavailable.
American consul at Tuxpam as esti
mating the attacking force at l.nnn
(Continued on (age five).
A CABINET OFFICER
TELLS MINERS'
SECRETS
W. B.WILSON, SECRETARY OF LABOR,
IN ADDRESSING FELLOW UNION
ISTS AT SEATTLE, TELLS OF IM
MENSE PROFITS MADE BY CAL
UMET GPERATORS.
$121,000,000 DIVIDENDS
ON CAPITAL OF It 250 .000
- t -J f
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 12. Secretary
of Labor William B. Wilson, address
ing the American Federation of Labor,
bitterly condemned the attitude of the
Michigan Copper Mining companies
and warned tliem that a new concep
tion of titles to property was in prog
ress of formation. He declared he
would make public not only the wages
paid to the miners, but hours they
worked and the labor conditions, but
the enormous profits of the mine own
ers. Secretary Wilson, who addressed
the delegates as ''Fellow unionists"
said:
"The department of labor as now
organized and directed will be utilized
to cooperate with the great trade
union movement in its effort to ele
vate the standard of human society.
One of the general duties imposed
upon the department under Its organ
ic law is the duty of promoting the
welfare of wage workers.
"The one great specific duty impos
ed upon the department is the duty
to act as a mediator in trade dis
putes, to appoint commissioner of con
ciliation in trades disputes.
"There can be no mediation, there
1 can be no conciliation between
em
plovers and employe that does not
presuppose collective bargaining, and
there cannot be collective bargaining
that does not presuppose trade union
ism." Of the situation at. Calumet, the
secretary said It had heretofore been
the custom to Investigate wages,
hours and kinds of labor, and report
these to the public. "This time," he
said, "it had been determined to go a
step farther, and Investigate the earn
ing of the corporations Involved.
"And the little bit of confidence that,
I am going to glrtf-youf" he added, "is
an advance statement of one of the
items in that situation that the larg
est corporation engaged in the produc
tion of copper in the Michigan dis
trict, was organized in 1870 under the
laws of the state of Michigan, that
the face value of its capital stock Ib
$2,500,000. The shares are $25 each.
They were purchased at $12 each, so
that the actual investment is $1,250,
000. From that time until one year
ago, the last fiscal report that we
had, a period of forty years, that cor
poration declared in dividends $121,
000,000 on an investment of $1,250,000 ;
and made reinvestments out of its
earnings of $75,000,000. Nearly $200,
000,000 of actual net profits in a per
iod of 42 J'ears on an investment of
$1,250,000, and then not only protest
against meeting committees of their
workmen, but refuse to accept the
good offices of the department of la-
jbor in negotiating tne nimcuities.
I
CHANGES FROM "WET"
WORKS FOR ANTIS
FORMER GOVERNOR PATTERSON OF
TENNESSEE TRAVELS IN SPECIAL CAR
TO ANTI SALOON LEAGUE MEETING
IN COLUMBUS, TO TELL THEM OF
HIS CHANGE OF HEART.
Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 12 Today's
session of the Anti-Saloon National
convention was to be known as gover-
uinoia, auu nuugea, ui naiiws.
see as a "wet," Patterson came to Co-
ilumbus in a special car accompanied
i by Governor Ben W, Hooper, who sue-
ceeded him as Tennessee's chief
cutive, to give his endorsement to a.
IlBUOII - Wlue lllBl wuum Ut.,c
for iis aim the elimination of the
have not always been friends,
The
pains we iraveleu were
wide
apart.
They seemed so parallel that it look-
ed incredible that they should ever
meet. But we now find ourselves in
the same road and actuated by the
in
curse.
"I am aware that to have suddenly
changed the views of mature woman
hood which I once asserted and pro
claimed from one end of Tennessee to
the other, has excited surprise and
provoked comment. But , this is a
world ot change. I am neither asham
j STRIKER HELD
FOR ASSAULT i
TO MURDER ,
HEARING OF LOUIS KING SET FOR j
TO DAY BUT CONTINUED-NO j
CLASH BETWEEN CIVIL AND MIL!-!
TARY AUTHORITIES NEWSPAPER f
DDIUTCn mn MftMV nCTHIIO I
j
'COLORADO MILITIA CAN
tiA- AW VIIPIH mn
NUI lit I I Htm rAT
Trinidad, Colo., Nov. U. Civil and
military authorities appeared this
morning in justice court when the
case of Louis King, a striker charged
with assault to murder, came up for a
hearing. An expected clash between
the judicial department of the Colo
rado national guard and the oiilcers of
the district attorney over precedence
failed to materialize when by agree
ment the case was continued and
King's bond was increased from ?700
to $l(MO. King has not furnish bond
and is being held at the county jail.
Relations between General t.'haso
and the district attorney, threatened
to become strained Monday when four
military prisoners were released by
the civil authorities. Later they were
rearrested by uenerat cnase. Y ester-
uny a iimiwuy pauui searaiea lor
King but did not locate him.
King is charged with having fired
shots during an attack by strikers up
on Tabasco, which wounded the two
children of Frank Wootton, a ma
chinist. He was apprehended by the
civil authorities before martial law
had been declared. Captain Danks,
who represented the military authori
ties at the hearing made it clear that
General Chase would exercise his full
power in expediting the trial of all
criminal issues growing out of the
strike situation. A general movement
of strikers between Ludlow and
Agutiar last nignt, precipitated no
elastics as was learned by the military
authorities.
Extra forces were dispatched to the
district prepared to meet any einer-
gency that might arise. Military and
civil authorities report that quiet pre -
vailed throughout the strike zone last
night. General Chase visited Ludlow
this morning and received a small
quantity of weapons recently conns-
cated by the troops.
Printed Too Much.
Pueblo, Colo., Nov. 12 The princi -
pal business this morning before the
grand jury Investigating the coal "Some persons think that we op
strike was the appearance of repre-j pose giving. Far from it; we do not
sentatives of an evening paper who j oppose giving, but we advocate Intel
were questioned concerning the jligent giving giving that iB done
sources' of Information of stories print-! with the Christmas spirit of goodwill
ed in relation to the doings of the jury, las distinguished from giving that is
Members of the jury and those in ! compulsory, from fear or with the
charge of the investigation object to
the printing of any news concerning
the investigation.
Court Order Needed.
Denver, Colo., Nov. 12. Deputy
State Auditor Ballou nt noon today
notified Governor Amnions and Attor
npv flenerfil Farrnr thnt he bad re
ceived telegraphic instructions from i
Auriitnr wnnon nm in swt.io nnt i
to Issue certificates of Indetedness toa
cover the expenses of maintaining the
national guard In the Colorado coal
strike zone without a court order.
I Governor Amnions stated that a
j mandamus suit to compel the is
suance of the certlficaes would be in
stituted immediately In the state su
preme court.
rueiAUiM AMBCCr
THE DBY IN CQNGKfcOO !
Senate.
Not in session; meets Thursday. I
rinninf rata mot in rnnfprpncp, nnd i
discussed currency bill.
House.
Met nt noon and adjourned at 12:35
p m. until noon Thursday.
AMERICAN TARS
CALL ON THE POPE
Rome, Nov. 12. A large party of
American blue-jackets was received
this morning in private audience by
the Pope. The men were conducted to
the Vatican by Captain William J.
Maxwell, of the battleship Florida and
were presented to his holiness by Mon-
sigiior Thomas F. Kennedy, rector of
the American college in Rome.
exe-.NEW battleship to Bt
COMMISSIONED CHRISTMAS
Washington, D. C, Nov. 12 Theth
new battleship Texas, which lately i
naa ner acceptance u.ai, u i.uw f of whlch 44 officers and men repre
cent completed, according to an offl- j sentmg the 8ix companies were pres-
ciai Biaiemem, uy iu iiu uepainurm
today. The vessel probably will go
into commission about Christmas.
ed to stand before this great audience
and acknowledge the wrong, when I
once advocated policies which would
have made legal a trade which I have j
come to look on as having no rightful ;
place in the scheme and economy of ,
Christian civilization." j
Commenting on one of his messages
to the Tennessee legislature in which
he opposed further legislation to regu
late the liquor traffic Mr. Patterson re
Iterated that at that time those were
his honest convictions based on a mis
taken Judgment.
SPUG SEASON NOW
OPEN -ARE YOU
A SPUG?
THE NEW SOCIETY STARTS ON ITS
SECOND YEAR UNDER MOST AU
SPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES-MRS.
J. BORDEN HARRIMAN TELLS OF
THEIR OBJECTS.
WOULD ELIMINATE i
ALL USELESS GIVING
Xew York, Nov. 12. A country-wide
appeal for the abolition of the useless
Christmas gift and a plea for intelli
gent and thoughtful giving instead
were voiced tonight' by Mrs. August
Belmont, President of the Spugs, at
the opening meeting of the 1913 cam
paign to be waged by that organiza
tion against insincerity, compulsion
and waste in Christmas giving.
At this meeting the
membership
rolls of the Spugs the Society Pn- thel
Prevention of Useless divine -were I
thrown op"ti to all residents of ,heVtliem in the courteous office in X
United States who might want ' j en-i
roll against the foolish Christmas
gift. Having grown from a handful
to more than 5,000 wilhm a fe- weeks
.liirina the last ChristmK? season ihel
. .. . . , , . J , ,
national e.-i'iinalgn and hone to estab-
.. . .,, , ,..
.,,,,,,,
Mrs. ,1. Borden Harrlnian presided
at tonight's meeting. District Attor
ney Whitman, newly enrolled as a
member, and Francis Crowninshleld,
delivered addresses. Mrs. Belmont
was the orator of the evening. The
lormimil nurnose of the societ she
0i,i ,,. ,.0m,t nnm,-.Wn Mv.
Ing by girls in stores and factories to
their employers, the custom of collec
tive giving which the girls felt they
jcould not afford, but which they could
jnot avoju without embarrassment, and
(possible loss of their positions. This
i wa8 ol)H cf the chief objects of the
society,
she added, but not, the only
one. Another prime attainment
uniulit nlip Haifl wns n creneral cnlti-
vation, by all classes of givers, of more
thoughtl'ulness and expression of per-
sonality in making Christmas gifts,
' "We do nofr disapprove of collective
I giving when It is done on the spur of
j the moment," she said, "or for some
'particular Muse, because then It
j means that you have collected a sense
0f human fellowship .of which the
money collected Is but an expression.
!we do approve of it when it is for
jthe man lower down instead of for the
' man higher up.
hope of obtaining reward whether I
that reward be the favor of the man
hlgher up or advancement. The world j
at large should put more of the Christ-
mas spirit into giving. Christmas i
should be a time for every person to
dc his or her share.
"Some folks say to us, 'Of course,
you want to promote useful giving.'
The word useful has many changes of
meaning. Usually when one thinks of
useful present, it is a present decid-,
edly middle-class or commonplace. So
we do not attempt to promote useful
giving, in the commonly accepted
definition of that word. The thing we
are really cut to do Is to abolish some
thing. We feel that when we have
done that there will follow good sense
in giving and that everybody will be
profited thereby.
"We propose to decrease the cost of
the gift and increase the good will; to
make the heart of Father Christmas
rejoice by little 'acts of kindness, un-
selfishness, by putting thought into
the gift we sent our dear ones. Give
generously; but from your heart, with
all your thought. Don't make a busi
ness of giving, make it an art. Don't
waste what should be a season of
goodwill freely given."
IMPORTANT RULING
.REGARDING MILITIA PAY,
Washington. D. C, Nov. 12
The i
secretary of war has no authority to j
dictate the number of officers and
men of the militia necessary to con- j
stitute a rifle camp of instruction j
wimsp nfflcerR and men shall be paid ,
under the militia account. Comptrol
ler of the Treasurer Downey, final ar-
'lil.iK .i,n, nunallnna Hantrlorl an tlV
!
q the au(mor for I
Hpnnrtment ruled that a re-1
. .mnn,nt . irlm militia, i
ent, was not an encampment recogniz
ed by the war department.
PUEBLO SCHOOL BOY IS FATALLY
INJURED BY HAZING OF COMRADES
Pueblo, Colo., Nov. 12. Standish ,
Hamilton, age 14, is perhaps fatally
hurt as the result of a grammar
school "haiing'' late yesterday after
noon.
The boy
recently was withdrawn
from a private school and enrolled In I
NO DANGER OF
LOSING THE
SCHOOL
SUCH IS IMPRESSION GIVEN "ARCH
AEOLOGISTS" AT MEETING LAST
NIGHT, FOLLOWING READING OF
TELEGRAM OF FRANK SPRINGER,
ENDING OFT REPEATED SMI
RESOLUTIONS LAUD
HEWETT TO THE SKIES
BEHOLD THE "SCIENTISTS"
WHO SELECT HEWETT!
"The school Is absolutely con-
trolled by the managing commit-
tee of 30. They are people chosen V
for their fitness to serve on such
a board. These are the U
A People who direct the affairs of
School or American Archaeo- X
You can find a list of
the 1'alaco of the Governors. .
"Rnt 1he committee will cer-
taln'y flllml i,s scientific obliga-X
tions which are as sacred as a
Mason's oath or a nun's vow X
ill everything that concerns the
work of the school in its obliga- SS
g tion to science and to education." S6
(Statement of C. F. Lummis read St
' last night). X
Here is the classification of the S
V committee of 31 (not 36, as Mr. $
' Lummis states) who direct the af-
X fairs of the Archaeological 5S
X Scool of the committee with X
"scientific obligations": X
Competent men engaged In Am- X
X erican Archaeology 3 X
Semitic, Egyptian and classl- X
X cal professors competent and X
X incompetent 6 X
X Zoologists 2 X
X Politicians 2 X
X Lawyers 3 X
X Clergymen IX
i' '""
Diplomats : IX
Business men and nondescripts 7 X
1 scientist X
jX and 1 school, teacher) 4 X
iX Squaw belt litterateurs IX
X
.Rl X
X X
Total ..
XXX
X V X X X
The reading of a telegram or ex
tracts of a telelgram from Hon. Frank (
Springer now in Washington that
there is no occasion for Santa Fe to
worry about the School of American
Archaeology being taken away from
Santa Fe; the passing of resolutions
praising Mr. Edgar L. Hewett to tho
skies and denouncing the "attacks"
made by famoiiB scientists on him in
the New Mexican; the Impression giv
en certain persons that the resolu-
tions attacked the New Mexican It-
self for alleged "bias" and the chal-
lenge offered Dr. J. A. Rolls to show
uuy copies of the New Mexican con-
tabling statements against Mr. Hew-
ett that can be successfully contro
verted; the vigorous denunciation of
Prof. AKred M. Tozzer of Harvard, by
former Governor W. T. Thornton who
declared Tozzer Is but an instructor;
the reading of a lengthy letter from
Charles F. Lummis, Bquaw belted lit-
terateur of Los Angeles, making the
same statement; the bombshell ex
ploded by Mr. Paul A. F. Walter in his
own "camp" by announcing that Mr.
Tozzer is indeed a real, living assist
ant professor at Harvard and not an
instructor, the disgust depicted on cer
tain faces of some of Mr. Hewett's
supporters as Lummis's letter, filled
with personalities, was read; the clev
er way portions of the letter were
omitted by Mr. . Walter and finally
the question asked by Mr. Cutting why
the summer school has been dwindling
in attendance which question remain
ed unanswered these were some of
the features of the meeting of the
Archaeological Society last night. .
As some one expressed it today; "It
was a meeting full of action."
Rolls Reads Resolutions.
Judge John R. McFie presided and
occasionally put on the soft pedal
when the "discords" Vegan to grow
too loud. Paul A. F. Walter was sec-
retary.
There were about 36 people present,
ladies outnumbering the men two to
one.
Dr. J. A. Rolls, chairman of the
resolutions committee, arose and read
lengthy resolutions with many a
whereas ana suD-statements tell
ing that the society considers attacks
ma(Je 0JJ Mr Hewett UIlfair in manner
and biased in motive, and that if these
attacks were not controverted they
might result in luob of the school to
Santa Fe; moreover, that the commit-
(Continued on page four).
the Bessemer public school. As he
was riding home on his bicycle yester
day, he was attacked by boys, dragged
from his wheel and beaten and kick
ed. He sustained a fractured skull,
several broken ribs and other Injuries.
He says the assailants told him they
were "initiating" him,
V
.!.-'

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