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Santa Fe new Mexican. [volume] (Santa Fe, N.M.) 1898-1951, December 31, 1913, Image 4

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SANTA FE I
IEXICAN.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1913.
PAGE FOUM
SPOR
"RUBE" WADDELL, GREATEST LEFT-HANDER BASEBALL EVER KNEW,
WAS THE BILLIKIN AND PETER PAN OF THE GAME; HE MADE
PEOPLE HAPPY AND REFUSED TO GROW UP.
1 TraSSBCTjPByP
Of all the baseball character the
. quaintest was George Edward
("Kube") Waddell, of St. Mary's E1K
county, Pennsylvania, the Billiken and
Peter Pan of the game.
Waddell was a mine of fun for a
sporting page humorist; a horrible
example for the temperance lecturer;
a joy to the fans; a terror to batters,
and a nightmare to the managers who
had him.
A boy who never grew up, the gi
gantic Waddell was baseball's Peter
Pan. At one time he was almost a
WHO WILL BE THE
PITCHING FIND
IN 1914 GAMES
(By E. A. Batchelor.)
1 Who will be the pitching find of
1914?
Just about eight American league
managers would like to know th
answer to this question and each
hopes to discover that the man who
is to wear the title draws salary at
his own particular pay window.
There is almost certain to be one
find for they have been bobbing up
regularly for several seasons and
among the unusually large crop of re
cruits who will be tried out next spring
there surely should be some jewel.
The year 1!U3 produced two hurlers
in the Johnsonian league who would
merit the title "find." These men
were Joe Boehliug, of Washington,
BOMBARDER
Bombardier Wells, English heavy
weight, met Georges Carpentier,
French champion, at the National
Sporting club, London, December 8.
and was knocked out lor the second
time by the marvelous French boy in
less than one round. . The photograph
Bhows Carpentier assisting Wells to
his feet with the referee bending over
him and Wells' seconds climbing
through the ropes.
TiNG
national figure because of his eccen
tricities. Haseball was more joyous because
of him. He was a jester, but his
comedy never harmed anyone and he
was never vulgar. He was a fun-maker
extraordinary. He drove away
gloom like the sun dispersing a fog.
He made everybody happy. Millions
smiled at his antics. He was the billi
ken of the game.
Now Waddell, victim of tuberculo
sis, is paying the price of his years of
night-hawking and revelry, but those
and "Reb" Russell, of Chicago. There
were some good ones besides this pair,
of course, but none of the other young
sters was quite up to the standard of
these young men,
In 1912 Jean Dubuc, of the Tigers,
was distinctly "the" find of the season,
his good work helping the Tigers, who
i otherwise were wabbly, to maintain a
j semblance of strength. The stocky .
1 French-Canadian had a fine winning
percentage in spite of losing Bonn?
tough luck games through his tenden
cy to blow up in the ninth, inning.
He piled up a comfortable string of
consecutive victories in mid-season
only to have it broken by the Yankees
who happened to catch Detroit when
Jennings' club was going particularly
badly.
It was a curious coincidence that
both of the hurling finds of 1913 are
lefthanders. Boehliug, who estab
lished a season's league record for
winning games in succession, had no
professional experience when Clark
WAS KNOCKED OUT
v . -. .- v... a jmm&mms&ae a
NEWS
who know him best say ho will greet
the reaper with a grin and a joke.
Waddell went from one team to an
other between 1S97 and 1900, but in
1901 'found" himself and became a
mighty factor for Jim Hart's Chicago
team. The day Waddell and Mathew
son fought their duel, which the
"Hube" won, he was a Chicago hero.
Waddell loved the lights. He liked
to don a bartender's apron and serve
drinks to a crowd. Once, having
wandered upon the stage of a the
atre where an animal act was on, he
fooled with a lion until the beast
clawed his arm, whereupon Waddell
repaired to a police station and,
w hile his wounds were being dressed,
unraveled a tale of beink held up and
stabbed by highwaymen, whom he had
bested, this story being intended to
keep Mart from fining him next day.
Connie Mack handled Waddell bel
ter than anyone else. Mack's way
was to make him believe the other
fellows regarded him as easy, where
upon "Rube" would shoot them across
so fast they looked like marbles.
While with the Athletics Waddell
pitched the first game of a double
header winning after 14 innings, and
then refused to leave the box, winning
a nine inning game. He won a 20-in-ning
contest from Boston, against Cy
Young, and a 17-inning game from
Bill. Dlnneen. He offered to pitch a
four-game series against the White
Sox; and won the first two games, but
was' knocked out of the box in the
third. '
Waddell tried football at ButlerPa.,
and when he walked upon the field
with a keg of nails balanced on each
hand, (lie opposing team left the field.
In the winter of 1903-4, Waddell
starred in "The Stain of Guilt." His
act consisted of foiling the villains,
but he put so much realism into his
acting that new villains were neces
sary every week or so. 1
Many of the tales told of Waddell
were exaggerated. He left a delight
ful memory, free from strings. A phy
sical marvel, with few equals as a fun
maker or a pitcher, irrespressable and
devil may care, he sowed fun broad
cast. He was everyone's friend an3
his own worst enemy, and the world
is better because "Rube" Waddell
lived on it.
Griffith took hold of him, being discov
ered by a Washington newspaper man
in Richmond, Va., where he played
with the Battle Ax club, a semi-professional
aggregation. When Griff
flrst grabbed lilin Joseph had all t lie
wildness usually accompanying sinis
ter pitching talent, but the Nationals
took hold of him and tamed him so
thoroughly that control was his strong
point last season.
Husseii came to the White Sox from
Texas, where his baseball experience
had been very limited. With the Fort )
Worth club, of the Texas league, he j
did not achieve any particular distinc
tion,' but he certainly blossomed out
when he struck big league society.
He has the nerve of a porch climb
er as a foundation for his success,
harboring the conviction that no bat
ter living has any right to face him.
The first time he faced Ty Cobb, Joe
Jackson and Eddie Collins he didn't ;
even know who those great hitters
were, nor did lie seem to care upon be-
IN A ROUND.
Ml
ing informed that they made a special
ty of massacring young and ambi-1
tious hurlers. In addition to his oth
er accomplishments, he proved him
self an "iron man," taking the place
that Walsh formerly held as the every
day worker for Callahan.
It is entirely possible that the Tig-
era will be lucky enough to grab off
the 1914 find, in which case they ought
to be seen in the first division, provid
ing the older pitchers do not slump. j
One youngster as good as Boehlins or j
Russell would be a mighty big help to j
Jennings, especially if he could work)
often. There certainly is no lack of ;
quantity on the Detroit hurling, staff
and if the kids can only produce some
real quality, local fans will have jnany
causes to rejoice before next fall.
BOB FITZSIMMON CANNOT
RE-ENTER RING IN NEW YORK. '
New York, Dec. 31. That Bob Fitz- j
Simmons, once heavyweight champion j
of the world, cannot re-enter the prize j
ring in New York, was the decision
formerly reached yesterday by the
New York State Athletic commission.
I'Fitzsimnions said he was "feeling I
! stronger" than ever, but the commis :
. sion held that he no longer possessed
! the stamina to stand a fast bout. Fltz
! Simmons recently challenged any
j member of the white hope class to
'engage him in a ten-round bout.
FEDERAL ROUT IS
PREDICTED BY OJINAGA
(Continued From Page One.) i
ences were expected to be held today. !
preliminary to the anticipated opera ,
tions against Guaymas.
Agree on Ransom. :
Chihuahua, Mux.. Dec. 31. Two I
hundred and fifty thousand dollars goH
has been agreed upon by General ;
Villa, as the ransom he will accept fo: i
Hip rplpiiup nf I.niH TopraMo tirn i-.i '
the rich Mexican land owner, who hs:s
been imprisoned here for five weeks
on the charge that he had supported
Huerta.
The money is to be paid by Luis
Terrazas, Sr., who has been negoti it
ing at El Paso for the release of his
son. The prisoner is to be brought to
the border, under safe conduct. The
women members of the Terrazas fam
ily already have gone to the border.
When the federal army evacuated
Chihuahua, Terrazas, Sr., went with
them but the son remained behind to
look after the estate. He was arrested
by Villa, on the entrance of the rebels.
General Choa, a rebel chief, is to be
come governor of Chihuahua state as
soon as General Villa leaves for his
campaign southward.
Mercado Denounced.
Vera Cruz, Dec. 31 The United
States gunboat Dolphin from Santiago,
Cuba, arrived here this morning, as
did also the British' vessel Alabama,
which brought stxty'Tefugees. mostly
Spaniards from Chihuahua. The refu
gees were thirty-four, days on the way
to the coast, Many, of them bitterly
denounced the federal general Merca
do for abandoning Chihuahua.
Warned Against Move.
London, Dec. 31. Miguel Covarru
bias, ex-minister of Mexico to Russia.,
and now confidential apeiit In London
of the Mexican constitutionalists, to
day issued a Warning against the pro
posed Bclieme for the payment of in
terest on the Mexican National rail
ways. ,
"The transaction will not be recog
nized by the constitutionalist govern
ment of Mexico," Senor Covarrubias
said. "Therefore the securities of
fered in lieu of cash .will never be ne
gotiable." Civil War In Guaymas.
Hermosillo, Dec. 31. The federals
of tne Guaymas garrison begau ii.ct
ing today among themselves, accord
ing to a report sent to military head
quarters here by General Alvardo in
charge of the insurgent outpost above
Kmpalme.
It. was said that late this morning
a heavy fire was heard from the out
skirts of the California gulf city and
there had been no insurgent attack
nor any insurgent forces within range
of the federal position.
Desertions to the constitutionalist
side have been occurring for several
days.
ANTI-TRUST SUIT IS
THREATENED BY FEDERALS.
Indianapolis, lnd., Dec. 31 That
organized baseball will be attacked
as a trust under the Sherman anti
trust law and as maintaining a black
list, in case any injunctions are sought
to restrain players under the reserve
clause from playing with the Federal
league, was indicated by a statement
yesterday by Edwin E. Gates of this
city, counsel for the Federal league.
"Any baseball club that attempts to
obtain an injunction," said Mr. Gates,
"to restrain a player from playing
in the Federal league, must come in
to court with clean hands.
"The National commission, if it
goes into court, will immediately be
confronted with two very serious
propositions, namely, is the commiS'
sion a trust within the meaning of the
Sherman anti trust act, and is not, iu
fact, a blacklist maintained?"
Mr. Gates declared the Federal
league has been consistent in Its pol
icy not to enter into negotiations with
a player who has signed a contract to
play the season of 1914 with any of
its rival clubs in either of the Nation
al, American or any of the minor
leagues.
"We maintain, however," said Mr.
Gates, "that the reserve clause is Il
legal and not binding upon players,
lacks mutuality and is against public
policy."
For quick results,
little "WANT."
a
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jring results, Try it
always
j THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC AMONG
1 INDIANS DISCUSSED.
(Continued From Page One.)
mem, the government continues limit
ed authority by reason of provisions
of treaties or agreements, or through
special acts of congress. This serv
ices commenced in 1907 with an appro
priation of $25,000; since that time the
beneficial effect of this work has be
come so apparent that $100,000 was
appropriated for the last fiscal year.
"The liquor evil is recognized as
one of the greatest confronting the In
dian today, not only because of its de
moralizing influence, but for the fur
ther and very important reason that
it makes him dn easy 'jirey to the un
scrupulous. There art' many instan
ces where, w hen' under the influence ol
liquor, the Indian has been induced to
ronvey his property without consider
ation. My coiptug to Denver for this
inference is that we nay more per-'
.ectly organize and systematize this
work, for it is my firm purpose, with
lh use of good judgment, to aggres
sively undertake to carry out in good
I'-itlt our treaty relationships in this
respect, and so effectively use the
f inds appropriated by congress as to
i sure the best results obtainable. It
if iiiy desire to co-operate with the
stale and local authorities. I am
sure that the evil resultB of the liquor
tralfic among the Indians is a matter
of grave concern to the white citizens
of the country, both for the reason
that they are properly interested in
the uplift of the red men, and for the
further reason that the impoverish
ment of the Indian means that he will
ultimately become a charge upon the
taxpayers of the several states."
Mr. Sells stated that he will leave
tomorrow for Muskogee where he has
arranged a conference with tribal at
torneys, probate attorneys, field clerks
and county judges to consider probate
matters affecting the minors of the
five civilized tribes. Of conditions af
fecting the Indians in Oklahoma he
said:
"I have recently discovered that it
costs about 3 per cent to settle a
white child's estate and that it costs
more than 30 per cent to settle the
estate of an Indian boy or girl. It is
my determined intention to reform
this indefensible practice. To this
end I have recently appointed a num
ber of probate attorneys who will give
their whole time to this work. I am
now submitting a number of cases to
the grand juries in Oklahoma looking
towards the indictment and criminal
.
WITT f
p. -fan &iL W'
ft I
i
I
3ra
9fi
'A
prosecution of those who have em-
bezzled their funds."
I Mr. Sells expressed interest in the
i proposed Indian pageant in Denver in
11915.
TO SEARCH MINE FOR
FUGITIVE MOUNTAINEERS.
Pineville, Ky, Dec. 31. Adjutant
General Ellis received word this
morning from Governor McCreery to
spend no more time in the siege in
attempting to capture "Happy Jack"
Hendrickson and his clan of moun
taineers who are hiding in the mine
between here and Elys. The adju
tant general was ordered this morn
ing to take men and enter the mine.
He prepared to act accordingly some
time this afternoon. Twenty search
lights have been obtained and these
will be used by as many men, while
twenty other men will follow heavily
armed.. - -
TO INVESTIGATE LONG
ISLAND POISONING.
Ainityville, L. I., Dec. 31. Heroic
treatment was being administered this
afternoon to Mrs. Charles Wingate,
daughter inl-aw of General Geo. W.
Wingate, chief counsel for the Long
Island railroad, in an effort to save
her life from the effects of a slow
poison which she took last night.
General Wingate said hi" was sure
the poison had been taken by mistake
but the case was nevertheless referred
to the disrtict attorney's oftice for in
vestigation. MONA LIZA IS AGAIN
ON EXHIBITION IN PARIS.
Paris, Dec. 31. The return today of
Da Vinci's Mona Liza, to Paris, after
an absence of two years and four
months was made a ceremonious oc
casion by the French government.
The picture, after traveling from
Florence to Rome and thence to Milan
under careful guardianship was com
mitted to the care of the representa
tive of the French government, Henry
Marcel, conservator of the French na
tional museums, who arrived here, with
a staff of assistants this afternoon In
a private compartment of the express
train from Italy.
REPUBLICANS BUCK AT
CONFIRMING PINDELL
Washington, Dec. 31. Republicans
of the senate foreign relations com
mittee have made it known that they
will not agree to final action on the
appointment of Henry M. Pindell,- of
Peoria, 111., as ambassador to Russia,
until they have an opportunity to ex
it
m
a
m
.
v J
CARBON
PAPER
The copies made are clean, neat-appearing and distinct The inks (black, blue,
purple, green and red) do not rub or blur. Ml'LTiKopv is clean to handle and
wonderfully long-lived. Made in six varieties: The following list names the varieties
and gives manifulding power of each :
REGULAR FINISH HARD FINISH
MulliKopr, U-Wu, 20; Medium,; Billing, 6 MuhiKopy. LtWt. 16; Medium, 6; Biffin. 4
Write for Free Sample
urp ft for 100 lettrrs. Mention your name, firm's name (or school) and
dealer's nauii- in writing for sample. , f
Star BrsSid Typewriter Ribbons "KSJJi -TJE
"e" without cloecioK the type so as to show on the paper.
NEW MEXICAN PRINTING CO.,
SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO.
amine certain correspondence be
tween Mr. Pindell and Representative
Stone, said to bear on activities of
postmasters in Illinois. Letters have
been sent to Mr. Pindell urging him
to lay the correspondence before tli9
committee.
CANADA TO STAMP
OUT POTATO DISEASE
Ottawa, Out., Dec. 31. The Cana
dian government has decided to take
drastic measures to stamp out the
potato disease in the raaritine prov
inces and to this end Prof. John
Adams, of the Royal College of
Science, Dublin, is to have charge of
the investigation of the subject. A
conference of experts will, be beld in
the near future at Woodstock. N. 11,
in view of the Washington embargo
against Canadian Potatoes.
EIGHT DIE IN NEW
YORK TENEMENT FIRE
New York, Dec. 31. Eight persons,
five men and three women, were kil
led in a tenement house fire at 96
Monroe street, in the crowded east
side district today. Fifteen persons
were injured, four seriously, by jump
ing from fire escapes.
The fire started on the ground floor,
cutting off escape by the stairway.
It is supposed to have been of incen
diary origin.
New Mexican Want Ads. always
Vine results. Try It.
'."'-"Juurru Lnruwrmju iru tru,
A Happy,
Healthful
NewYear,
With a
Plentiful Share
of its
Choicest
Pleasures and
I A Great Big- Chunk
of its
Prosperity!
Is the sincere wish of
m mry
COMPANY
ikn ' n ruinj uuvn. nnjrnnnnjrjxrinji vn
piooe
Y IWVC Aj'j'l
filing system?, good
typewriters, good paper
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lie fortified against any
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AGENTS,
15

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