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Santa Fe daily New Mexican. [volume] (Santa Fe, N.M.) 1885-1897, July 22, 1890, Image 1

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NEW
SlEAiCAjN
VOL. 27.
SANTA FE, N. M., TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1890.
JS0.12b
S. SPITZ, :
Gold and Silver
INE FILIGREE JEWELRY
Diamonds, Watches, Clocks anil Silverware.
No Ealse Representation made
u( loiU.
Slorft ami Factor.
Neit door Sec.iail lUrimi I n-ul
Diamonfl Setttni and Watch Bepairini Promptly ani Etttiy Done
ESTABLISHED IN 1859.
AUGUST KIBSCHNER, Prcpr.
DEALER IN ALL KINDB Off
FresS, and Salt ieats anil Sausago of aft Kinds
SAN FRANCISCO ST., SANTA FE, ti. M
JOHN GRAY.
Real Estate Agent
Fire, Life and Accident Insurance.
Collection of Xtent nod Account.
XOl'AUY I'UIiLIC. TVl'IiWllll'Kll.
PROPERTY FOE SALE OR R73iSTT
Rant Side of I'liwa
H. B. CARTWRIGHT,
Sunccmior to CARTWKIGnT; OKISWOI.W,
DEALKK IN
ft SI it Fi! Graemes
We are Manufacturer' Agent Tor the well known
Dbw Drop toil Cannefl Fruit Septals
Also agents In Santa Fo for ratent Improved Flour, the
lincst llour in tlio market.
Wo keep in stock' thn world renowned PEAIJODY CKEAMKKY
BUTTER, Fresh Fruit, Confectionery, Kuts, etc.
No. 4 Bakery in Connection with the Store.
1858 :
: I8m)
IHfOBTKU aVU JOBBIK 0
General
erchandise
SAN FRANCISCO STREET,
Largest and Most Complete Stock of Oeaer.tf U. rtiiandUe
Carried la th Entire South w- m
SA.IrTA. Jra, - JSTIEIW MEX
Telegraphic Tidings
WASHINGTON MATTERS.
THE TARIFF TALK OK AGAIN.
Washington, July 22. The senate has
the tariff bill under discussion.
THE ELECTION BILL.
The Republican members of the senate
committee on privileges and elections
were again in gt ssion yesterday consider
ing the federal elections bill. John I
Havenport, of New York, was closeted
with the members this afternoon. It is
understood that the bill to be reported to
the caucus is practically completed, but
the time for its being given to the caucus
has not vet been nxed.
IIURRVINO Till! WORK.
In order to provide for thespecdy trans
action of claims to be tiled under the de
pendent pension act, 403 additional clerks
wer3 employed in the pension ollico yes
terday, lti3 more in the reward and pen
sion division of the war department and
ten in the second auditor's oflice. For
the payment of these additional clerks
congress has appropriated the sum of
OFFICIAL Kl'MOR.
It is rumored that Minister Lincoln has
finally resolved to retire from the English
mission. Mrs. Lincoln will leave London
for her home in Chicago early next month,
and her husband w ill follow her in No
vember. It is understood that he will not
return to England, but w ill resume the
practice of his profession in Chicago. It
is said that the president's advisers have
suggested to him the name of Chauncey
Depew for the post. The ollice would be
agreeable to Mr. Depew, w ho is a social
favorite in London, whore he is at present,
and it would remove from the political
Held a formidable competitor for the presi
dential nomination. It is hinted that
Lincoln too has presidential aspirations.
CONGR ESSION A L.
SENATE.
Washington, July 22. On motion of
Hoar the select committee on relations
w ith Canada was authorized to continue
their investigations during the coming re
cess until next session.
The house bill to amend the act of June
22, 1874, for the relief of settlers on rail
road lands was reported and placed on
the calendar.
Dawes moved to proceed to considera
tion of the Indian appropriation bill.
Gray asked him to yield to permit the
bill to transfer the revenue marine to
naval establishment to be taken up in
the morning hour.
Morrill informed Dawes that if he did
not proceed with the Indian appropria
tion bill he (Morrill would proceed w ith
the tariff bill.
Gray remarked that the senator from
Vermont could hardly exclude all other
matters that might not have the extent
and magnitude of the tariff bill, as there
was no legislation that could be so order
ed by the senate during the remainder of
the session that could not take some time
for the consideration of the tariff bill, and
be did not think that the senator should
proclaim at the outset that nothing else
shonld be considered.
Morrill said it was not his purpose to
antagonize particularly the bill of the
senator from Delaware, but be did propose
to ask the consideration of the tariff bill
in opposition to any other measure ex
cept appropriation bills.
Gray made a motion to proceed to the
consideration of the house bill to transfer
the revenue marine service from the
treasury to the navy department. Agreed
to, yeas 30, nays 23.
The Republicans who voted yea were
Cameron, Casey, Culloiu, Farwell, Frye,
Inualls, Mitchell, Sawyer, Spooner, Teller
and Washburn. The Democrats who
voted nay were Bate, Cockrell, Gorham
and I'ugh.
The senate proceeded to consideration
of the bill, which having been read, fixes
the date for the appointment of the rev
enue marine officers to be officers of the
navy at January 1, 1801, so that it prac
tically will be of no service in the collec
tion of customs for revenue. The only
object of the bill was to advance the pay
of officers to the extent of $151,000 per
year and to have them entitled to be placed
on the retired list. These officers have
not asked for the measure.
HOUSE.
The committee on public lands report
ed a resolution calling on the secretary
of the interior to inform the house by
what authority, and why he has author
ized and directed the issue of patents to
the Union Pacific Railroad company for
lands granted the company prior to the
payment of the debt due to the United
States from said company; that he also
report to the house the amount of land
patented and certified to each land grant
corporation of the Union Pacific railroad
system up to this date. Adopted.
On motion of Dockery, of Missouri, by
unanimous consent, a vote was ordered
on the original package bill for to-day,
and a vote on the bankruptcy bill Thurs
day morning. Dockery then otlicially
announced the death of Representative
James P. Walker, from congestion the of
brain, at Dexter, Mo., Saturday after
noon, and delivered a brief eulogy. Ap
propriate resolutions were then adopted,
and the house adjourned.
REAGAN ,CALLED DOWN.
He Whacks New Mexico and Gets a Prompt
lcesponse from Senator Teller.
Washington, July 22. The long de
bate in the senate upon the irrigation
question has resulted in a clearer general
knowledge of the subject than was eve
known before at the capital. The result
of the debate is thought to be conclusive
so far as congress is concerned, as it is
now believed that the house, in view of
the light shed upon the topic, will con
sent to the senate amendments to the bill.
Senator Reagan, of Texas, who led the
fight on behalf of Director Powell, was
very unfortunate in charging improper
motives on the part of those who favored
the striking out of the appropriation de
sired by Director Powell. Mr. .Reaean
was called down by Senators Stewart,
Dolph and Teller. The latter said, among
other things :
"There can be, as the senator from Kan
sas (Mr. Plumb) illustrated the other day,
but little opportunity to monopolize land
which has to be irrigated. There is no
inducement for it, and the people who
have been taking this land since 1880,
1881 and 1882, were not taking it for irri
gating and farming purposes, but for cattle
raising purposes, and when the great cattle
industry broke down on the public lands,
as it did a few years since, there was no
inducement to go there, and there is not
a single cattle company that I know of in
that region of my acquaintance, either in
New Mexico, Arizona, Idaho, Colorado or
Montana, that has not lost money on its
investment in land, and there is not to
day any danger under thepresentexisting
laws of monopolies getting hold of the
public lands in any large areaB.
"The land department has ruled on the
desert land act so strictly that there can be
no combinations, and that there never has
been any combination which succeeded I
assert from knowledge of every effort
that has been made. There lias been no
syndicate that has ever succeedinz in se
curing any large body of land under the
desert land act. It has been tried, but
it lias tailed, and it will always lau while
the department maintains its present
ruling, ine senator lroni Texas tells us
of great attempts to gobble all the land
in the Pecos valley. In the Pecos val
ley to which I called attention the other
day, there has been $700,000 expended
and $300,000 more must be expended be
fore it can be made available and valu
able to the people who are building that
canal. In the west the canals are the
carriers of water only, and no canal com
pany in the west, unless it is in New
Mexico, is anything under the law than
a carrier of water, and when New Mex
ico takes hold of the subject, as it w ill
when it becomes a state, it will adopt
the same rule that all the new Btates
have adopted, making the ditch com
panies simply the carriers of water, the
price to be fixed by the municipal au
thorities, the people who are Interested."
SIGHT SEEING IN SANTA FE.
A T.ndy Tourist Who was Charmed 1th
the Illaturc City A Jtcart
able Letter.
PALACE
A TALE OF THREE TOWNS.
A Las Vegas Woman and Children Cruelly
Deserted by One Krennugh.
Ledvillb, Colo., July 22. A sad case
of desertion came to light in this city the
other day. The family of J. 1. Brenaugh
was found in a cabin on the north side,
just outside the city limits, in a destitute
and half starving condition. The discov
ery was made by Peter Merch, a pros
pector, who owns the cabin, and who,
seeing smoke coming from the chimney,
went to investigate. He found Mrs. Bre
naugh engaged in getting dinner from a
few articles of food someone had evidently
given her. The children, fourin number,
the eldest being 11, w ere but poorly clad,
and one of them was quite ill. Mrs. lire
naugh said her husband had deserted her
two weeks ago, leaving her without a
cent. By begging the children had man
aged to get enough to eat. Her husband
came from Pueblo, she said, four weeks
ago and had taken them to that cabin.
He was trying to get work.
The case coming to it; attention of
neighbors through Mr. Mtnli's efforts, a
purse was raised and the family will be
sent to Las Vegas, N. M., where Mrs.
Brenaugh says she has relatives who w ill
take care of her.
It is not known where Brenaugh went.
Mrs. Brenaugh is rather at an attractive
woman, 35 yeurs of age, and says her
relatives in New Mexico are quite
wealthy.
Hraneh of the Santa Fe.
New York, July 22. The stockholders
of the St. Louis and San Francisco rail
road, at a special meeting to-day voted
on a proposition to increase the capital
stock $10,000,000. It is not intended to
issue the stock at once but to prepare the
way for the issue of bonds in case the
company sees lit to build certain content
teuplatcd extensions.
Demand Iteform.
Hartford, July 21. Five hundred
members ot the Brotherhood of Railroad
Firemen held a meeting here yesterday.
Resolutions were adopted favoring the
passage of a bill pending in congress re
quiring railroad companies to use auto
matic brakes and couplings on freight
trains. A resolution was also adopted
which pledges the members to do all in
their power to prevent trainmen from
working on Sundays.
Kot Vet Fighting.
Paris, July 22. The Guatemalan min
ister here, referring to reports from Mex
ico that war has broken out between
Guatemala and San Salvador, says the
telegrams from Mexico are incorrect, as
war has not been declared. He says no
Guatemala troops have crossed the fron
tier of San Salvador. Its minister is of
the opinion that the fight referred to in
the dispatches must have occurred in the
interior of San Salvador, between factions
in that country.
The Charaa Placers.
The last shipment of placer mining ma
chinery for the Pittsburg Mining com
pany left Espanola Thursday last for the
Chama placers, accompanied by Supt.
J. H. Bascomb, who has personally at
tended to the loading and shipping of the
machinery. It is a splendid plant and
will be washing gold in a few weeks.
The Kendall Mining company expects
to begin washing this week.
Mrs. Jay T. Adams, 'wife of the Denver
and San Antonio, Texas, real estate deni
er, recently in Santa Fe, writes aa follows
to the San Antonio Times :
"Santa Fe is a beautiful place to simply
rest in, though enough places of interest
can be found to occupy many years.
Every nook and corner has either a beau
tiful orchard and garden an old church
tilled with rolics or some historical asso'
ciation ; as every one knows it i the old
est town m the United States, as the
Spaniards who came here in 1."S2 found
an Indian village already established. It
has not yet been incorporated. Its alti
tude is over 7,000 feet and its population
neany iu,wu.
The old San Miguel church founded in
1550, is we!' preserved and the oldest
house in the I nited States stands oppo
site; this was found occupied in 1540 by
the Spaniards and it is not known how
much older it is; families rre still living
in it. The museum attached to the ca-
j thedral contains some rare pa ufings and
suk tapestries several hundred years old,
also some line pieces of old carvings in
brass, silver, ivory and wood these are
all of a sacred elmracter.
One of the most interesting places is
"Gold's Old Q'Kosity Shop." This is a
large room, literally packed with reiics of
the Spaniards and Indians, as well as the
present work of those people. There is
everything, from the little bows and ar
rows and beads and pottery to old waons,
huge brass tubs and the "famous Navajo
blankets. The workshop whero the
filigree jewolry is made by Mexi
cans and Indians is of great interest.
Although the town is so tilled with old
relics it is by no means behind in modern
improvements. There have been $1,510,
000 spent here in the last few years iu
public buildings. The territorial capital
is a magnificent structure built of a beau
tiful brown stone which is quarried near
here. There are public schools, two In-i
dian schools, several Catholic schools, I
court house, federul building, peniten
tiary, cathedral and hotels, all of which
are fine large buildings. There is also a
military post of two companies, including
a fine baud, which entertains the people
about the plaza every night in the
week. There are a number of large mon
uments erected here to the memory of the
men who have fallen in defenso of the
city in conflicts with Indians and Span
iards.
The orchards are a marvel ! Such fruit
never grew anywhere else! It grows in
such abundance that part of it has to be
shaken off before it reaches maturity, to
prevent tfie trees lrom breaking down.
Cherry trees are so full of fruit tl.at there
is no room for foliage. Apples, pears,
peaches, quinces, etc., are not ripe yet.
Small fruit grows in abundance; black
berry, raspberry and currant bushes are
a solid mass of fruit of a large sweet va
riety. The ground is red with strawber
ries, lliese only require a little care to
make them perfect. One gentleman who
owns but one acre, has a little of every
thing in it, thoroughly cultivated. He
has more than enough fruit to supply his
lamily of seven the year round, and sev
eral hundreds of quarts of fruit are put
up every year. All this is accomplished
with the little attention he can give it
morning aud evening.
The mines here aro very rich ; one
which was assayed last week returned
$1,750 per ton. Another one sold recently
for $2,01)0,000. There are only two tur
quois veins in the world, and one of them
is here. To men took out of it last week
$1,000 worth of these stones. There
is an unlimited amount of both hard and
soft coal of fine quality. With all theae
resources from agriculture ami mining,
property is very cheap. A good business
corner can be had fur $(iU0. Kino acre
property for from $50 up. There are
plenty of bargains to be picked up, al
though a few who appreciate the advant
ages of the place ure holding land quite
high. In the ecstacy over the other
things, climate is almost forgotten, but it
is in keeping with everything else. The
days, as well as the nights, are delight
fully cool, and with the numerous moun
tain resort? with their trout fishing and
mineral springs, one could live here a life
time with plenty of changes of scenery
and occupation and never go far from
home.
First
Class.
Santa Fe,
:otbl
RUMSEY
BURNHAM.
New Mexico
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Miss A. Mugler,
Millinery and-
Fancf Goods,
GRIFFIN BLOCK,
Southeast Cor. Washington Av.
SANTA FE, N. M.
J. W. OLINGER.
H-and-i-E
Cor. Water aud Hon Coar Sts.,
S.A.ICTT'.A. -F.TIErW MEX
PEDRO PEREA, - President
T. B. CATRON, Vice President
R. J. PALE!., - Cashier
The Second National Bank
OF NEW MEXICO.
OJ-rPIOTTLJL JPIE UP - - $150,000
Doe, a general banking bmlaesi and lollelti patronage of the public.
L. SPIEGELBEBft, Pres.
W. Q. SIMMONS. Caahle
W. N. EMMERT,
vtuuw mm a uv u uuuiioo
e .J
San Fraiioisco St., S. W. Cor. Plaza, SANTA FE, N. N.
SOL. LOWITZKI & SON.
ESTABLISHED 1878.
Livery and Feed Stables
Best Stock of Horses and Carriages in town.
HACKS PKOMPTLY FUimSlIED.
Don't fall to vlalt TESITQCE I!niAX VILLAGE; three hour on the round
trip. Special attention to ouiUtiing traveler over the country. Careful driver
furnished on application.
Lower San Francisco St., SANTA FE, N. M
The Ph. Zang Brewing Co.
Proprietor of th y
ROCKY MOUNTAIN BREWERY,
DINVKR, COI.O.
With a Capacity of 150,000 Barrels per Annum.
ADOLPH J. ZANC, Cen'l Mangr.
CELEBRATED PILSENER BOTTLED BEER a Specialty
Local Agent, B. IIA'LEY.
A SUMMER RESOM!
Q-O TO
THE PICTURESQUE PECOS VALLEY.
I hare opened a Comfortable Hontelrle on the Upper I'eoo. near Oeoper'a
where tourl.t and the eltlien of New Meiloo will have ererr eoeomodatloa
while enjoying an outing in thlt delightful pou
Dally Stage to and from Glorleta on the A., T. A 1.
J?. POWERS,
GLOKIETA, X. M.
HEW MEXICO THE COONEXHGr
The Mesilla Valle its Garden Spot!
'TEN
E3ITOXJC3-E3:.
79
,..,, irrigated Land Unproved I ..InM e.. lHurH.-iUrl, ,ii,r. for tale o long tinc Urn L.tereM. . WAUKAKTY DEEDS GIVE. Write lor lll.mtratetl folder, giving fall particular.
j K LIVINGSTON
' Cenera I Agent.
RIO CRAWDE LAWD COMPANY. Las Cruces. W. (ft

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