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Santa Fe daily New Mexican. [volume] (Santa Fe, N.M.) 1885-1897, August 14, 1895, Image 2

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The Daily New Mexican
Y NFW MEXIRAI PRIMTINO CO.
Mr-BntBrd as Second CUns matter si 'he
Santa Post Office.
RATES OP SrtiacRIPTIONB.
Daily, per week, by carrier $ 25
faily, per month, by carrier 1 00
Daily, per month, b'v mail 1 00
Daily, three months', by mail 2 50
Daily, six months, by mail 5 00
Daily, one year, hy liiui! 10 00
Weekly, pr month 25
Weekly, perquarter 75
(VfiDicly, per six inonl hs 1 00
Vekly, per ear 2 00
All contracts and hills for advertising pay'
bin monthly.
.ll communication intended for publica
tion nmiit be accompanied by the writer's
oume and address not for publication but
vi evidence of good faith, and should be ad
dressed to The Editor. Letters pertaining to
fcusineas should be iildressed
New Mexican Printing Co.,
Santa Fe, New Mexico.
W"The Nkw Mbxtcan is the oldest news
paper in New Mexico, ft is sent to every
rot Office in, the Territory and has a large
t.id growing circulation among the intelli
gent and progressive people of the sonlh-Wtat.
WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 14.
The long silence of Blood to the Bridles
Waite, of Colorado, gives rise to the awful
Binpioion that he is afflicted with lockjaw.
How serviceable that 150-mile an hour
train, proposed by Westinghouse nnd
Baldwin, would be to McKinley in airing
his presidential boom.
The action of the Las Vegas board of
education in excluding children nnder
seven years of age from the benefits of
the public schools of that city is ns in
just as it is arbitrary. Why not open a
kindergarten?
Why not employ some of those Jack
son Hole newspaper correspondents as
blood detectives at the Holmes "castle"
in Chicago f Clearly men capable of
manufacturing nn Indian war out of one
dead Indian eould make something of
themselves if they had tbe Holmes case
to work on.
Judoino from the fact that 100 or more
delegates representing the soveral states
are talking free coinage and straight De
mocracy in the national capital to-day, it
would .appear that the cause of silver
isn't doing mnoh "dying out" as far as
Democracy is concerned. It is the gold
bugs and the Republicans who insist on
the "dying out" business.
Tnit Republicans of New York didn't
sneer very exteusively at the electoral
vote of "little Colorado" the clay after the
presidential eleotion in 187C, when the
three votes of that state would have given
the presidency to Tilden in spite of the
larceny of the votes of Florida, Louisiana
and South Carolina. The time may come
again when the Republicans will need
Colorado and need it mighty bad.
state, and other properties were put up
by the Pennsylvania Trust company, of
Reading, executor of Joseph C. Wright,
deceased. Scarcely 5 per cent on the face
value of the properties was realiztd.
There were very few bidders. The face
value of the twelve mortgages wns
i,200, and they brought $120. Five
Kansas farms, aggregating 720 acres, were
soid. A few years ago they were valued
at $25,000. The entire lot brought $2,315.
Some of the farms were settled during the
boom, then improved and havesince been
abandoned.
Therefore when we read about wonder
ful yields of this or tha product in the
Arkansas valley or any other valley we
need not go into n furore and try to get
options on nil the farm land in sight be
fore it goes up to some tremendous price,
for it is not going to do anything of the
kind, or if it does you can get it next
year, when the reaotion conies, for a
ridiculously low figure.
It must be understood, of course, that
all this is in referenoe to lands used for
agricultural purposes. Such ns are situ
ated near a city, or are reputed to con
tain oil or mineral, may have a certain
additional speculative value. But no ag
ricultural laud can have a farm value ex
cept snoh as is based on the actual cash
value it yields. To try to give it nny
further value is like trying to invent per
petual motion or a self-propelling ma
chine. It oan not be done.
These remarks, says the Pueblo Chief
tain, are freely offered in the confident
belief that it is directly contrary to the
interests of the people, whether in city
or country, to hae land held nt high
prices. City values are an entirely diff
erent thing. If a man does not want to
pay $100 a front foot let him walk tint
to the suburbs to buy lots it will do him
good. But agricultural land ought to be
kept down to the lowest possible price,
and by the inexorable law of output and
intrinsic worth it is going to be.
PEESS COMMENT.
THE PRICE OF LAND.
Just now there is apparent all over the
western country, a sort of boom in farm
ing lands, such as usually occurs when
manufacturing and other employments
nre depressed. In consequence laud
values have gone up to some extent, but
beyond the actual figures at which they
can be sold there is an indefinable idea of
what is "going to be," just as, in the
cities when they are having the good
times, there is the exhilarating prospect
of what is "going to be."
Now let us ask whether it is either
probable or desirable that agricultural
lands should go up to any fancy prices.
We have already seen what beoame of the
"going to be" in the cities, and have wit
nessed the bright hopes and sanguine
predictions which have fabulous values
to their suburban lands flattened out like
the shapeless, helpless balloon whose gas
has escaped.
If the idea that any western lan's are
"going to be" worth vast sums per aore,
either in the near or far future, is well
based, it would be logioal to suppose that
in an older country we would find farm
land held at tremendous figures. But a
casual investigation will show that fine
farming land, which does not have to pay
any ditch assessments or to lie limited in
its water Bupply by expansive and non
expansive dividing boxes, can be bought
in northern Missouri for $25 to $10, in
southern Missouri for $15 to $25, and
Becond-olaM land at $5 to $7.50 nn acre.
In south central Ohio, within the rich
belt of the Ohio valley yet away from the
cold lake winds, fair land is offered at
$12.50, and in Kentucky rolling yet fertile
land can be obtained for the same
amount which has under it beds of fine
eoal five feet thiok. In Tennessee mar
velonsly rich land can be had almost for
a song.
In the New York Sun and Philadelphia
Record advertisements have been run
ning for many months offering five-aore
tracts of good, well drained, partly wood
ed farm land in New Jersey for $75, or
, $15 an acre, lying right between the two
largest oities in America.
It is notorious that in New England
hundreds of farms, with good houses Bud
great splendid barns, have for years been
abandoned because they oan neither be
old nor rented. The deer have so in
creased in numbers that last winter a
herd of them trotted through the streets
of a Vermont town.
Going aoross the ocean, official reports
just published in England (how that the
ratable value of all the land in England
and Wales declined from 39,835,000 in
1870 to 83,66i,000 in 1894, a faot due to
agricultural depression. In Germany
agrarian agitation ia what ia poshing bi
metallism. Before leaving tha subject, it may be
noted that in Beading, Pa., a few days
ago twelve mortgagee oa Kansas farm
lands, a lot of 1C0 acre farms in the same
A Just J mice.
Judge Collier will this week hear a case
in which millions are involved, but he is
equal to the responsibility, and will give
an honest decision, and one that will lie
just to the litigants. This distriot is for
tunate in having a judge of unquestioned
probity. Albuquerque Citizen.
Man Juan Kriilts.
Messrs. Darling and Sneed of the Den
ver & Rio Grande railway visited the
Times Saturday last. Their mission to
this county was an important one, that
of computing by personal inspection and
inquiry the probnbleoutput of fruit for the
purpose of considering the question of a
reduotion in rates from Durango to the
large centers snoh as Denver and Pueblo.
The railway men have visited the larger
orchard j, and gained all the information
possible. They assert that the people
should commence the reform movement
at this end. First, they say, that the cost
of hanlnge to Durango is too much; next,
then, the price of the apple box lumber
is too great. We can not expect, so they
say, the railway to stand the loss oc
casioned by the prioe of haulage and
boxes, to ont down their rates so as to
save the ranchmen in these respects.
The railway must be paid a paying prioe
as well as tbe freighters, so they assert.
Farmington Times.
Knights Temnlurs Hates.
August 17 to 22nd, inclusive, "The Bur
lington Route" will sell tickets to Bos
ton at one fare for the round trip, and
give you choice of routes east of St.
Louis or Chicago. Many beautiful water
trips offered. For full information apply
to any coupon agent or G. W. Vallery,
General Agent, 1039 Seventeenth street,
Denver, Colo.
4 A. 1C, Louisville, Ky., Sept. 10-1 1,
195.
For the above occasion the Santa Fe
route will place cn sale tickets to Louis
ville, Ky., and return at one fare for the
round trip to Chicago or St. Louis, added
to 1 cent per mile from those gateways to
Louisville and return. Dates ot sale
September 6 to 8, 1895, good for return
passage until September 25, 1895.
For particulars oall on agents of the
"Santa Fe Route."
H. S. Lutz.
Geo. T. Nioholson.
Items of Interest Hy The WnliaMi
Man.
Bulletin No. 6.
The state of Colorado has at present
about B, 800,000 acres of public lands.
From Kansas City to St. Louis by the
Wabash, the distance is 277 miles, Toledo
G62 miles, New York 1137, Boston 1189
miles.
Of vacant public lands in Colorado
there are 40,851,000 aores.
The Wabash is the popular line east
for its free chair oars, excellent meals at
low price, and its direct connections in
Uainn passenger stations.
The United States national debt is nt
present $915,962,7.12, or $11.02 per
capita. The per capita indebtedness in
France is $116; in England $87; in Dutch
East India 64 cents.
Any truthful ticket agent, lawyer or
newspaper man will tell yon that the
Wabash is the best and cheapest line
east.
Lookout for bulletin No. 7.
C. M. Hampson,
Commercial Agent.
IT
A LADY'S TOILET
Is not complete
without an ideal
POriPLEJllOH
U powoeb. y
pozzois
Combines every element of
beauty and purity. It is beauti
fying, soothing, healing, health
ful, and harmless, and when
rightly used is invisible. A most
delicate and desirable protection
to the face in this climate.
Insist tpea having thi ftnolni.
IT II f M Mil EVERYWHERE,
The
of . .
NEW
ME
Valley
FFERS unequaled advantages to the farmer, frail grower, live stock raiser, dairyman, bee
keener, and to the home-seeker eenerallv.
The soil of the Peoos Valley is of high average fertility, and nnder irrigation produces bountiful crops of
most of the grasses, grains, vegetables, berries and fruits of the temperate and some of those of the semi
tropical zone. In such fruit as the peach, pear, plum, grape, prune, aprioot, neotarine, cherry, quince, etc.,
the Valley will dispute for the pre-eminence with California; while competent authority pronounoes its
upper portions in particular the finest apple country in the world.
Enormous yields of such forage crops as alfalfa, sorghum aud Egyptian oorn make the feeding of oattle
and sheep and the raising and fattening of hogs a very profitable occupation.
The cultivation of oanaigre a tanning material of great value is beooming an important industry in
the Peoos Valley, a home market having been afforded 'for all that oan be raised, at a prioe yielding a
handsome profit.
The climate of the Peoos Valley has no snperior in the United States, being pre-eminently healthful and
health restoring.
Lands with perpetual water-rights are for sale at low prices and on easy terms. The water supply of
the Peoos Valley has no equal in all the arid region for oonstanoy and reliability; and this with the superb
olimate, productive soil and the facilities afforded by the railway whioh extends through "the Valley's en
tire length, will oaue these lands to enjoy a constant, and at times rapid, increase in value.
The recent completion of the Pecos Valley Railway to RoBWell will cause the mire rapid settlement
and development of the upper portions of the Valley, inoluding the rioh Feliz seotion. The company has
recently purchased many of the older improved farms about Roswell, and has now for sale lands to meet
the wants of all raw lands, partially improved lands, as well as farms with houses, orchards and fields of
alfalfa and other orops. In the vicinity of Roswell several pieces of land have been divided iuto five nnd
ton acres traots, suitnble for orohards and traok farms in connection with subnrban homes. Certain of
these traots are being planted to orchards, and will be cultivated and bared for by the company for three
yenrs at the end of which period they will be handed over to the purchasers. Write for pamphlet fully
describing the terms and conditions on which these Beveral olasstB of traots are sold.
FOR FULL INFORMATION REGARDING THE PECOS VALLEY WITH COPIES OF ILLUSTRA
TED PCBLICAT10JS ADDRESS . '
Tbe Pecos Irrigation and Improvement Company,
Eddy, N. M., or Colorado Springs, Colo.
VI60R MEN
Easily, Qulcky, Permanently Restored.
Weakness, Nsrrossne,
Debility, ana an we "ait
01 evils irom eariy errors or
later excesses, the results of
overwork, sickneas, worry.
etc. Dull strengin, devel
opment ana tone given to
overy organ anu nuruuu
of the body. Simple, nat
ural methods. Inimwlr.
te improvement Been.
c.n imnaiiM. ' fmn references. Book.
explanation and proofs mailed (sealed) free.
ERIE MEOIOAL CO., Buffalo, N.Y.
The Short Line
PROF'IONAL CARDS.
Dentist.
Spitz' Jew -, uie.
12 a. in.; 2 to 5 p. m.
BRAPi,
Id Knhn Block, over
Office hours, 9 to
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. -
MAX FR08T,
Attorney at Law, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
VICTORY & POPE,
Attorneys nt law, Santa Fe, N. M. Will
praotioe in all the courts.
GEO. W. ENAEBEL,
Office in Griffin block. Collections and
searching titles a speoialty.
EDWARD L. BARTLETT,
Lawyer, Santa Fe, New Mexioo. Office,
Catron block.
A. A. Fueemin, Elfkoo Baoa
Lnto Asso. Justice N. M. Sup. Court.
FREEMAN & BACA,
Attorneys at Law, Socorro, N. M. Wil
practice in the courts of Socorro. Lin
coin, Chaves and Eddy counties. Also in
the snpreme and U. S. Land courts at
Santa Fe.
E. A. FISKE,
Attorney and oonneelor at law, P. O. Box
"F," Santa Fe, N. M, practices in su
preme nnd nil distriot oonrts of New Mex
ioo.
T. F. CONWAY,
Attorney and Connselor at Law, Sliver
City, New Mexioo. Prompt attention
given to all business intrusted to his oare.
Fr tice in nil the courts in tne territory
A. B. RENEHAN,
Attornoy Bt Law. Practices in all terri
torial courts. Commissioner court of
claims. Collections and title searching,
Office with E. A.Fiskc, Spiegelberg block
Santa Fo.
ARE THE BEST
CIGARETTE SMOKERS
who care to pay a little more than the cos;
Of ordinary trade cigarettes will find the
PET CIGARETTES
SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS
- Made from the highest cost Gold Leal
grown in Virginia, and are
ABSOLUTELY PURE
L
lei
To all Points
East, North,
South and
West,
THROUGH PULLMAN SERVICE.
Fine line of equipment, dining and chair cars on all train
between Kansas City and Chicago. &sk agents below
for time cards.
E. COPELAND,
General Agent, El Paso, Tex.
E. S. LUTZ, m
Agent, Santa Fe, N. M.
pttaWalwi MM
THE NEW MEXICAN PRINTING COMPANY
PRINTERS AND BINDERS.
PUBLISHER!! OF
DAILY NEW MEXICAN
WEEKLY NEW MEXICAN
NUEVO MEXICANO.
Sola owners as maanfaotmrara for Vow Koarlnoaf tha TOT"
rATBvr njLX ' oravnra . bxjuvx oof
' All kinds of JOB WOBX dona wit aoatnsM u4 )tMPtafc
Write for Estimates ca VVcrk.
. The Best Equipped OBca ii Seaflraei.
mum
THE MAXWELL
Farm Lands!
UNDER IRRIGATING DITCHES.
s!
old Eiline
Choice Mountain and Valley Lands near the foot 1,1k
TOE SJXjE.
For the Irrigation of ta Tralries and YaUoys between Raton and
Springer On Hun4i4 mils of large Irrigating Canals have
boen built These laads with perpetual waist rights are sold cheap and
on the easy tanas of tea annual psanaieata, With 7 par oent Interest.
In addition to tha abere there as 1,400,000 asres of land for aale, cob
elating mainly of Agricultural, Coal and Timber Lands. Tha
olimate Is unsurpassed, aad alfalfa, grata and fruit of all Muds grow to
perfection and in abun&aaso.
Those vianins to view t&e icaw oaa sos a aaosiai rates en tne rail
roads, and will kavo a MbaAo alas a Mm sasmo, at tke;
aores or i
tkef should buy 160
The famous Cold Mining Camps near Elizabethtown and Baldy
are thrown open to prospectors on more favorable terms than locations
on Government land. Mining regulations sent on application.
Daily, four-horse, covered coaches leave Springer at 7 a. m., except
Sundays, for Cimarron, Baldy and Elizabethtown, and leave these points
every morning, Sundays excepted, for Springer.
The A., T. & S. l and U. P. D. & G. railroads cross this property.
WARRANTY DEEDS GIVEN. For full particulars apply to
THE MAXWELL LAND GRANT CO.
Raton, New Mexico.
Henry Hinges.
Make Direct Connect ions With
X3. & Ii. Or. TRAIN'S
Botli Ways.
Frank Stites.
Q Q Miles Shortest
Stage Line to Camps.
ANTONITO AND LA BELLE
-:0Yerland Stage and Express Company:-
UCJ IVTnil RUN. DAILY BETWEEN LA BELLE AND ANTON
. O. ilLctll. ITO, CONNECTING WITH TRI-WEEKLY STAGE
AND MAIL AT COSTILLA.
Best of Service tnirk Time.
Arrive at I.a Belle Daily 7 p.
3?" Just the Route for Ashing and prospecting parties.
J. G. SCHUMANN,
Boots, Shoes cV
Leather Findings,
Sole Agent for tha Ourt 4V Paokard Ohoet .
Santa Fa,
tow Mexico.
JOTTKRIFI HCHOBEH. President.
THE SANTAFE BREWING CO,
BBEWKB8 AND BOTTLIBB OI .
Santa Fe Lager Beer.
HANUVJLOTUaKBS Of
SODA MINEP4L & CABBONATED VATERS.
PATRONIZE THIO HOME INDUSTRY.
Palace Avenue, - - Santa Fe N. 'M.
COAL & TRANSFER,
LUC1DGR AND FGGD
All kinds of Bong tat Vtaisnoi Xuaakr Texas flooring at
tho Lowest Karket Mao; Windows nnd Boon. 4Jm earryoaa
gsaeral Transfer Business an deal in Hay ana ante.
DUDBOV Ct DAVID, Props.

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