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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 08, 1912, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1912-11-08/ed-1/seq-3/

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SOME REASONS FOR
SOARING FOOD PRICES
The food consumed by New York
City costs, at the railroad and
steamer terminals. 350 millions of
dollars a year. The New York State
Food Investigating Commission has
made a study of the food supply of
tho biggest city, and reaches this con
clusion. among others, says the'
World's Work.
The high cost of food in a large
city is beyond doubt due in very
large part to the chaotic and uneco
nomical system of handling which it
undergoes. The New York Comrais- ,
sion, after careful investigation, :
charged this increase of 45 per cent j
inthe cost of New York's food to j
waste and not to excessive profits.
It proposes reformed methods of food
distribution, which it believes would
save at least 60 millions a year. Every
city is a problem by itself, and the
New York Commission's recommeu
dations might be of small value to
other places. But there can be no
doubt that the local distribution of
food, almost everywhere stupidity j
indirect and wasteful, is a factor of
expensive living that well deserves
looking into everywhere.
Of general interest, however, are,
many of the Commission's observa
tions respecting the habits, prefer
ences, und idiosyncrasies of the peo
ple in relation to the cost of their
food. Every body knows, of course,
that the people who buy by telephone
pay the highest price and get the
least for their money, but this investi
gation has brought out the fact that
the telephone has generally in
creased prices because it has mul
tiplied deliveries. The housekeeper
who used to make out one dally list
now seizes the phone and sends in
an order every time she thinks of
anything she wants. She always
wants immediate delivery. The de
livery system now adds from five
per cent (in the case of the big
store) to 15 per cent (in the case of
the corner grocery) to the cost of
the article. The sensible proposal is
made that enterprising grocers and
butchers give a coupon, redeemable
in goods, for every purchase taken
away personally.
The New York Commission believes
that the extraordinary price now
charged for steaks and chops is
traceable to the increase of small
apartments, without cellars or pan
try room, and to the gas-stove. City
people living thus soon forget that
there are such things as roasts and
stew-meat
They forgot, too, that food can bo
bought in bulk instead of in caus. Of
canned goods the Commission hus a
good deal to say. I^ast year the
canned goods trade of Now York
City was almost 150 millions of dol
lars. Canned goods are expensive.
They sometimes run 10 or 12 ounces
to the pound. Package goods average
40 per cent more in cost than the
same goods in bulk. The trading* j
stamp adds three per cent. It is, of
course, an unmitigated nuisance and
an expensive folly, but many peo
ple in this world like to think they
are getting something for nothing.
More foresight in buying goods in
bulk personally instead of by tele
phone will save money for the house
holder. A co-operative marketing as- '
sociatlon with the neighbors would
save more. Fewer deliveries and
fewer commercial frills like trading J
stamps will save money for the re- '
tall buyers. Behind all this, in New <
York and in most other cities, com- J
prehensive facilities for ellicient food <
distribution are wofully needed. <
i
.
INVENTOR EIFFEL STUDYING
PROBLEMS OE THE AIR
While the French Airmen Vedrines
and Garros an- trying by practical
work to find a way to insure stability
in aeroplanes and safer landing fa
cilities. a well known engineer. M. !
Eiffel, the builder of the famous Eif
fel Tower, of Paris, is carrying out
elaborate experiments in wind pres
sure by means of which he hopes to
solve theoretically the problems of
aviation. At Auteuil he has estab
lished an enormous aerodynamic lab
oratory which contains among other
elaborate aparatus a system of fans
capable of producing wind currents of:
all speeds up to 45 yards a second.
By an ingenious contrivance of bal
ance he is able to test the pressure
on a plane surface at different angles
and In different positions, thus ob
taining statistics most useful to
French airmen. He is also giving
attention to the question of wind
pressure on the walls of an airship
shelter, also the force of different
kinds of propellors used on air
craft.
After preparations of the most
elaborate kind the Fourth Interna
tional Exhibition of Aerial Locozm.
tion has just been opened to the
public following an official visit by i
the French President. Airmen from :
all parts of the world and represen- ;
tatives of foreign governments, are j
in Paris, to study the latest aerial
inventions. From parachutes to en
gines. everything pertaining to aer
ial navigation is exhibited and one
section is devoted to motorboats.
Work of the
Road Commission i
Lieutenant H. C. Edgington, engln- '
eer for the Alaska Road Commission ?
was among the southbound passen- <
gers on the Alameda, from Valdez. i
Lieut. Edgington says that the road >
and trail work this year has been as ?
successful as could be expected, when ?
the limited amount of money appro- ?
printed for the work and the great ?
demands made upon the commission !
are considered. j
The trail between Seward and Idit- ?
arod has been completed, under the
direction of R. S. Oiddings, one of the
most competent employes of the com
mission.
Lieut. Edgington will remain in the |
South for three months, returning theu ;
to Valdez.
I
FAIRBANKS NOT
AT ALL ACTIVE
Dundas Yager arrived in Juneau
from Fairbanks on the last trip of the
City of Seattle.
Things generally looked pretty blue
for Fairbanks, according to- Mr. Ya
ger.
The country has never really re
covered from the failure of the Wash
ington-Alaska bank. Money is tight
and properties are idle because no
funds are available on development
work and operating expenses.
The Rhodes mine and mill is the
only one he says that is paying divi
dends among the quartz operators.
But this does not mean that the val
ues are not there.
Placer operations under the drift
ing methods are nearly at an end and
even in this branch of the mining in
dustry, it is almost impossible to
get cash advanced for running ex
penses.
No. 2 Ester was taking care of
itself and the rich tributary, Eva,
had developed some surprises.
SENT TO HOSPITAL.
Joe Souza, a prisoner of the feder
al Jail, serving three months for
hootch peddling, was. sent to St.
Anne's hospital this morning by the
marshal's office to undergo a minor
operation. Dr. Mahone is in attend
ance.
STEAMER GEORGIA
FROM THE WESTWARD.
The Georgia arrived from Sitka and
way ports at 5 o'clock this morning
with the following passengers: From
Sitka?Victor Johnson, Knute Knute
son. A. Goodman, Martin Lynch and
wife: from Tenakee?V. Cunnane, R.
Blanchard, J. Melody, Ed Com. L.
Marku, John and Alex Kivalo; from
Gypsum?T. W. Albertson. Chas.
Twoney, A. Brown and N. A. Erick
son.
The Brute.
Mrs. Knagg ? Henry Knagg, if
you're not in before 10 I'll never
speak to you again.
Mr. Knagg?Fine! I'll be back at
1L
WE WANT THE NEWS.
When you have a little Item, sen!
it in?
There is no time like the present to
begin:
We'll appreciate it too
Just like we always do?
If you'll promptly send your litt e
item in.
When you hear that something's hap
pened, mail it in?
It will only take two pennies' worth
of tin;
You'll feel better every day
Along life's rugged way,
If you'll think about the printer,
so begin.
If you know of any news note, phone
it in?
It will make us smile from forehead
down to chin;
It will drive away the blues
when your neighbor reads
the news
So phone your local paper?phone it in.
When you hear of some occurrence,
step right in?
We will greet you with a "howdy"
and a grin;
For we like to print the news
And 'twill save our only shoes
If we do not have to chase the items
in.?Douglas News.
THE BALKAN PEOPLE
Stefan. Prince Nemanjich-Dushan
jich, in a communication to the New
York Times has something to say
about the people of the various coun
tries of the Balkan peninsula which,
if literally true, would indicate that
the rest of the world has important
lessons to learn from tho people of
that part of the world. He takes
up a quotation from a previous com
munication by one Dr. Johnson, in
which the statement is made: "The
Balkan people are not like those of
any other part of the world," and
adds: "They are not. There is not
a poorhouse nor a pauper: not a beg
gar nor an illegitimate child; not an
insane asylum or insanity; not a mur
derer or a thief to be found in the en
tire length of the country." The rest
of the world might be prepared to
part with a portion of Its advance
ment and higher civilization to insure
such results, if it were possible to do
so.
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION.
Case No. 940-A.
In the District Court for the District
of Alaska, Division No. 1, at
Juneau.
First National Bank of Juneau, Plain- 4
tiff, vs.
Ellen G. Bach, Frank Bach, North
west Rubber Company, Schwabach
er Bros. & Co., Inc., defendants.
To the NORTHWEST RUBBER
COMPANY and SCHWABACHER
BROS. & CO., Inc., defendants,
GREETING:
In the name of the United States of
America and pursuant to an order of
the above entitled Court In the above
entitled cause made on the 5th day
of November, 1912, you aud each of
you are hereby commanded to be and
appear in the above entitled court
| holden at Juneau, in said Division, In
said Territory, and answer the com
plaint filed against you in the above
entitled action within thirty days
from the date of the last publication,
hereof; and if you fail so to appear
and answer for want thereof the
plaintiff will apply to the Court for
and the Court will grant the relief <
demanded in said complaint, to-wit: '
Judgment on a promissory note ]
against Frank Bach, in the 3um of <
one thousand dollars ($1,000.00), *
with interest thereon at the rate of. J
twelve per cent (12 per cent) per .
annum, from the 24th day of May, <
1909; one hundred dollars ($100.00) ]
attorney's fees: together with its ,
costs and disbursements herein in- ?
curred; further for a decree foreclos- ]
ing a certain mortgage upon certain ,
property situate in Douglas, Alaska, '
against all the defendants herein. '
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have .
hereunto set my hand and afllxed the <
seal of the above entitled court this '
5th day of November, 1912. ,
E. W. PETTIT, Clerk. <
First publication, November 5, 1912. J
Last publication December 17, 1912. ,
, i
SPECIAL TERM OF COURT.
In the District Court for the District
of Alaska, Division No. 1,
At Juneau.
In the Matter of Calling a Special
December, 1912, Term of Court at
Juneau.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an order of the Honorable
Thomas R. Lyons, District Judge for
the District of Alaska, Division No.
1, made on the 4th day of November,
1912, at Juneau. Alaska, a SPECIAL
TERM of the DISTRICT COURT will
be holden at the United States Court
House at Juneau. Alaska, beginning
on Monday, the NINTH DAY OF DE
CEMBER, 1912, at the hour of ten
o'clock In the forenon of said day.
E. W. PETTIT.
Clerk of the District Court for
the District of Alaska, Division
No. 1.
Dated and published at Juneau,
Alaska, this 5th day of November, A.
[D. 1912.
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS 515,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. P. KENNEDY. Pres.
JOHN RECK, Vlco-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
P. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. P. MILLER
T. P. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
THE BEST LOAF OF
f bread
% In Alaska o
? is sold At
> San Francisco Bakery ij
I G. MESSERSCHMIDT, Prop.
? ?
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW '
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sltka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakoe, Killtsnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m.. Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5. 11, 17. 23, 29, Jan. 4. 10,
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jun. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyeo, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle Rlvor, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9. 15. 21, 27, Doc. 3,
9. J5. 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8. 14. 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER |
M I I 1 I I II I I 1 18 I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I H
DRINK JUNEAU BEERi
; It is the quality that counts. Made from choicest Wis- ;;
; consin malt, imported Bohemian hops and the famous ;;
; Alaska Water. ;;
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY
; 5. ZYNDA, Prop. EAGLE BREWING CO. j'
H HI I I I I I I I I ? I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I 1
* ? ??????? ? " iTi l i i n i n n n
I 3 I |j I I I I I I I I I I I I y I n ? i m ?
r WHEN YOU NEED ;;
; Furniture, Mattresses, Stoves, Ranges:;
Cooking Utensils or Crockery
; and vou want full value for your money go to ;;
: JOHN P. BENSON, the Furniture Dealer::
Cor. Third and Seward Streets, Juneau
? Tons upon tons of new and up-to-date goods arrive at our store every week ..
a >i i ni 111111111111111111111111111111 n i a 11111
?i
I
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER"
FOR SALE AT ALL FIRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
,1i iI I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I 11111 111 11H 111 11 I I CI 11 11 I 11111J
:: THE LATEST AMERICAN INVENTION |j
MAZDA LAMPS
:: AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF ; ;
ELECTRIC LIGHTING GOODS
| J Can be obtained from the . .
ALASKA ELECTRIC LIGHT & POWER CO.
!! Third and Franklin Strceta Juneau ? |
->?; 1111111111; n 111111! 11111111111111111111111111II111
? 1 I l11 1111 I III HI I III 111 I I H 1 1 11 I 1 I II
j WM. BRITT, PL G.
DRUGWSTANDCHEMI^
" JUNEAU, ALASKA SKAGWAY, ALASKA jj
A complete line of drugs and chemicals, druggist sundries, pat- ..
ont medicines, rubber goods, toilet articles, stationery, cigars and
? ? candles. !!
]] A complete line of standardized drugs for proscriptions, which ..
are filled with utmost care and absolute acuracy.
?H-H-l-H-H-l-l-l-l-i-l-l-HH-l 'M I 1 11111 IM-l-l-M ?! 11 1 i-M 11 i H H-I -H ?
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Kogal Gas Engine
AT ASK A MF.AT flOMPANV John Reck, M^~
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Arc
Home-Smoked
"Autjica's Finest Flousikc Mills"
Plant and Product
one and inseparable
? f Pronounced by experts "America's Finest Flouring
/ Mills," the plant of the Fisher Flouring Mills
/ Company, was designed and constructed to produce
America's Most Efficient Breadstuff,
Fisher s Blend Flour
Separate machinery is provided for grinding hard and soft
wheat. Every grain is washed in the famously pure Cedar
River water and thoroughly dried before being ground.
It is no ulle Doast to say mat ini*
product is the cleanest, roost scien
tifically blended, most economical
flour offered for sale today. Combin
ing as it docs Eastern Hard Wheat
and Western Soft Wheat, it gives to
public and private bakeries a ma
terial which has all the advantages
of both hard and soft wheat flours,
is better than either, and decidedly
superior to any other blend hereto
fore produced.
One price at all dealers
Fisher's BLEND
^^^FLOUR^
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
ST A PLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
(???????flkt immmmmmmmmBmmmmmmmtmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmmaammm
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
I

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