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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 11, 1912, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. 7 NO. 8. JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1912. PRICE 10 CENT8.
THE BULGARIANS REJECT MEDIATION
GOV. AND MRS. CLARK
ARRIVE ON JEFFERSON
A goodly number of people. includ-1
ing Secretary Distin. Judge Lyons.
Collector- of Customs Willis. Deputy
.Marshal Mullen. Charles D. Garfield,
and many others congregated on the
dock today to welcome Governor and
Mrs. Walter E. Clark.
Mrs. Clark who was taken ill In
Fairbanks last August, has fully re
covered. Gov. and Mrs. Clark ar
y rived in Seattle on September 6.
where they remained until the sailing
of the Jefferson.
The greater part of the Governor's
time has been occupied in official bus
iness. Ho has compiled his anuual
report and forwarded it to President
Taft. In his report Gov. Clark laid
particular stress on the needs of
transportation to the interior, and
asks for railroads and wagon roads.
The fisheries question received con
siderable attention. He asked for a
more rigid enforcement of the present
laws and some minor changes and
asks for an increased force in the
Fishery Department for Alaska.
Gov. Clark says that he was op
posed to home rule a year ago and
that he has changed his mind on that
subject. However, he Insists that
since Alaska is to bear the burden
and responsibility of self-government
| it is too bad that the organic act
has limited and restricted the legis
lature so much. He says he hopes for
a full measure of home rule.
On being asked what he had to
say about politics, the governor re- j
marked: "What can I say?"
UNKNOWN MAN FALLS
FROM FERRY; DROWNS
An unknown man was drowned
from the ferry boat Teddy on the
last trip from Douglas last night.
There were twenty-eight passengers
aboard. The cabin of the boat was
filled and the entrance was jammed
with passengers trying to get shelter
from the wind.
As the boat rolled in the light sea
that was running, the man was seen
to lurch backward and fall over the
rail into the sea.
Claude Snyder, who was stauding
by the man's side at the time of the
accident, hurried to the wheelhouse
and told Captain States of the dis
aster. , ,v .
'Fhe launch was turned quickly and
headed for the unfortunate who could
be seen struggling and heard calling
loudly. Ed .McDougan, who was at
the wheel, called encouraging words
but just before the launch reached
him he gave three short shrieks and
disappeared. His hat still floated on
the surface and an unsuccessful ef
fort was made to get It.
r - ?" '? ?? 1
Irvin Warren together with Claude
Snyder, sat in the waiting room with
the lost man a few minutes before
the ferry arrived from Juneau.
When the man came down the slip
he stumbled and fell. Getting to his
feet he remarked, "the second time
! today."
The lost man was of Irish descent
so Captain States thinks, and had
traveled across with him several
times. He came here about two
months ago from Dawson or some
point in the interior. He was medium
dark complexioned and under 25;
about five feet seven inches tall and
neighed perhaps 145 pounds. He
./ore a dark hat. a gray suit and car
ried a watch. The first time Captain
States saw the man was two months
ago when he gave him passago to
Douglas where he expected to work
i in the government read camp. For
some time the man has been long
shoring. O. E. Head, the longshore
boss, was unable to identify the miss
ing man but has his name undoubted
jiy
FRIENDS WON'T
BOTHER WILSON
PRINCETON. N. J.. Nov. 11.?Dis
cussing his proposed vacation Presi
dent-Elect Wilson said: "My friends
have considerately agreed not to
look me up. and I am going to be
alone with my family."
McMANIGAL TELLS
Of DYNAMITE PLOTS
INDIANAPOLIS. Nov. 11.?On the
witness stanu in court here Ortie E.
McManigal told in detail the opera
tions of the alleged dynamiters. His
story deeply involves President
Frank M. Ryan and Secretary Hockin.
Frank Webb, of New York, and !
Michael J. Young, of Boston, members
of the executive board of the Interna
tional Structural Ironworkers' Union,
in the dynamite outrages of a few
years ago.
A Texes Sheriff
Kills Two Mexicans
FT. STOCKTON. Tex.. Nov. 11.?A
band of marauding Mexicans near the
international boundary last night dis
armed and shot Countable Scott.
SherifT Baker and a posse appeared
on the scene and killed two Mexicans
and wounded six more.
MAKE APPOINTMENTS.
Mrs. Marie Fox, the San Francisco
portrait artist, will take charge of the
Winter & Pond Co. studio tomorrow.
Appointments can be made for sit
tings between the hours of eleven and
two. Those wishing portraits for
Christmas should call at the studio
and arrange for sittings.
WINTER & POND. ???
W. HUNT KILLED
AT SHEEP CREEK
A fatal accident occurred at the
Alaska-Gastineau Company's workings
at Sheep creek yesterday afternoon.
Wm. Hunt was falling a tree when the
top broke off striking against another
tree, came back and crushed him to
the earth. Both legs and one arm
were broken and his chest crushed.
The iujured man was hurried to St.
Ann's hospital and given every at
tention but death ensued this
morning.
Deceased was an Englishman about
45 years of age. An effort is being
made to locate his people. No ar
rangements have been made about
the dsiposal of the body.
? ?? ? ? n r iiiI I IiI IIH I I I I I i
| Marine Notes j
-r-! I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II
The fishing schooner Waif came in
from the banks yesterday with six
boxes of halibut.
The Humboldt sails from Seattle
tonight "for Junejiu.
The Anita Phillips came in frotr
the fishing grounds yesterday bring
ing twenty-five boxes of halibui
which were caught in three days
This is probably a record catch foi
! that period of time.
Many of the fishing fleet are no*
out and due in at any time.
The Alki, of the Northland Steam
ship Company, arrived in Juneau a
7:40 this morning, bringing one hun
' dred tons of freight and one pas
senger.
The fishing boat Dora H., whicl
came in Saturday, leaves for th<
banks tonight.
The Gjoa, Capt. Norman, has beei
delayed waiting for bait, but expecte
to leave this afternoon for the hall
but banks.
The fishing boat Belle expected t
get away for the banks this aftei
| noon.
A GREAT BATTLE WITH
THE TURKS STILL RAGES
PARIS, Nov. 11.?A dispatch to the
Petit Journal from London, says that
all the European powers with the ex
ception of Austria, have presented a
joint note to the Bulgarian govern
ment offering to mediate between Bul
garia and the allies and Turkey, with
a view of ending the war.
The dispatch also states -that the
Bulgarian government had refused to
consider mediation until the great
battle now raging at Tchatalaja has
ended.
LONDON, Nov. 11.-rThc Bulgar
ian attack on Tchatalaja goes on re
lentlessly. It Isr eported that Mon
astir has been captured by the allies,
and also that the Servians have taken
Dlbra, an important town In Albania.
VIENNA, Nov. 11.?The Austrian
government is making desperate ef
forts to learn the truth of rumors that
the massacre of Christians had be
gun In Constantinople.
VIENNA, Nov. 11.?The European
war situation seems to become darker
and more complicated each day. The
success of the Bulgarians and their j
allies against their common enemy,
Turkey, has caused a condition akin
to consternation among* the European
powers and no one known what new
complications may arise dally.
The danger all along has been the
fear of a conflict which may embroil j
practically the whole of Europe in a I
general war, the like of which has
not been known for a century.
There is much excitement in Vien
na and other European capitals over
the possibility of a war between Aus
tria and Russia growing out of the
situation in the Balkan Btates. There
is no doubt that the condition is crit
ical.
. SITUATION NOT HOPELESS.
PARIS, Nov. 11.?"Dangerous, but
not hopeless," Is the political plight
of Europe, as summed up in French
official circles.
The efforts being made to effect
meditation have been postponed be
cause of the controversy which haB
arisen between Austria and Servia
over Servians having obtained access
to the Adriatic.
VICTORS ENTITLED TO FRUITS.
LONDON. Nov. 11. ?Speaking at
Guild Hall today Prime Minister As
quith said that he believed that the
general opinion of Europe was unan
imous that the victors in the Balkan
war should not be robbed of the
fruits of their victory that had cost
so dearly. England, Mr. Asqulth,
added, has no direct interest in the
territorial distribution Involved in the
war.
WARSHIPS AT CONSTANTINOPLE
WASHINGTON, Nov. 11.?Ambas
sador Rockhill has reported that there
are now bIx war vessols in the Bos
porus, and an additional six would
be sent by the European powers to
Constantinople.
CRUISER STRIKES MINE.
' LA VALETTA,, Malta, Nov. 11.?
An unconfirmed report has reached
here to the effect that a British
cruiser, the B&rhnn, has struck a
Turkish mine in the Dardanelles. No
particulars have been received.
A. B. GRAND CAMP
AT NORTH VANCOUVER
SEATTLE, Nov. 11.?Arrangements
have been completed for the holding
of the annual session of the Grand
Camp of the Arctic Brotherhood at
North Vancouver, B. C., which opens
tomorrow. Many delegates left last
night at midnight, on the steamer
Prince Rupert. James C. Gaffney is
the present Grand Arctic Chief and
J. F. A. Strong, of Juneau, is Vice
Grand Arctic Chief, and J. M. Kel
ler, of Skagway, Recorder.
EXPLODES BOMB
INJURES SIX PEOPLE.
NEW YORK. Nov. 11.?Because he
was denied free admittance to a
moving picture show Nunzio Sputa
faro exploded a bomb in an exit of
the theatre and injured six persons.
A panic resulted.
COL. RICHARDSON
GOES TO WASHINGTON
Colonel W. P. Richardson, head of
the Alaska road commission was a
passenger yesterday on the Mariposa.
Col. Richardson is en route to Wash
ington, where he will spend the win
ter. Speaking of the work of the
road commission the past season Col.
Richardson says that it was generally
satisfactory. Of course there is al
ways a scarcity of funds and the de
mand for roads and trails are increas
ing constantly Col. Richardson has
given a number of the best years of
| hiB life to this work. Hex knows Alas
1 ka like a book, and has been close
! ly identified with It since 1897, when
I he did excellent work for the pros
h pector and pilgrim at Circle City, and
other points on the Yukon.
GEORGIA ARRIVES.
( The steamer Georgia arrived at 9
o'clock last night with the following
! passengers: A. Rudpack, T. McKay,
. from Skagway; J. J. Rath from
I Haines; C. A. Dunbar, A. Boerushrin,
. from Berner'8 Bay; Mike Tako, John
c Morrella, from Eagle river; J. G.
Shepard, Jas. Morgan, Frank Man
f dich, Antone Augnolan, M. Tipola,
Chas. Yoki, Nirtor Sandin, E. Louie,
T. Angelia, M. Loon, Mick Jurtzen,
" S. Antone, from Comet.
h GOVERNMENT STENOGRAPHER
RESIGNS.
i
9 Harold M. Brown, stenographer tc
the United States local inspector ol
steam vessels, resigned his positior
" to take effect December 31, 1912. Mr
Brown will leavo Juneau about De
comber 2nd, using his vacation ol
thirty days In traveling homeward
o The young man will assume the du
;? ties of a private stenographer at Cor
nell University, Ithaca, N. Y.
The Ebner Mine
>
to Resume Work
Judge J- R- Winn, who returned a
few days ago from a visit to Eastern
cities on business connected with the
Ebner mine, says that satisfactory
arangements have been concluded
for the reopeuinjr of the minenext
spring- Thus another producer will
be added to the list of mines of this
section.
Judge Winn also talked with a num
ber of the Democratic leaders includ
ing Congressman Sulzer, now Gover
nor-Elect of New York, and the Judge
predicts good results for Alaska under
the incoming administration.
BAILEY RESIGNS,
JONHSON^SUCCEEDS
AUSTIN, Tex., Nov. 11.?Governor
O. B. Colquitt has announced that he
has received the resignation of Jo
seph W. Bailey, as the United States
Senator from Texas, and that H. M;
j Johnson, editor of the Houston Post,
would be appointed to the vacancy. j
AMBASSADOR BRYCE RESIGNS.
WASHINGTON. Nov. 11. ? James
Bryce, the British ambassador, has
tendered his resignation to his gov-1
eminent. He will return to England
and engage in literary work.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 11. ? The
| Post's London correspondent says
that Sir Cecil Arthur Spring Rice will
succeed Ambassador Bryce, at Wash
ington.
PRESIDENT YUAN TO RESIGN.
PEKING, China, Nov. 11. ? Presi
dent Yuan, of the Chinese republic,
lias stated that he will resign as soon
| as he has succeeded in bringing
; Mongolia into the Chinese fold.
JEFFERSON ARRIVES.
The Jefferson arrived at 2:20 and
was scheduled to leave at 4:30 this
ufternoon.
j M. J. O'Conor accompanied' Gover
nor and Mrs. Clark from Douglas to
Juneau.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Foero, of
Haines, were passengers on the Jef
ferson.
Prof. Georgeson and wife arrived
on the Jefferson and took passage on
the Georgia for Sitka.
James F. Hogan, a well known
Alaskan, was a passenger on the Jef
ferson for Skagway. He was ac
i companied by C. Cain, of Oakland,
r j Cal.
1 I
Judge Folsom received a wire from
- District Attorney Rustgard stating
f i that the latter would leave for Juneati
. tonight on the Humboldt.
-1 Joe Souzi, the federal prisoner ta
? ? ken to St. Ann's for a minor opera
| tion is back in his cell.
VALDEZ MEN
BOND CLAIMS
Valdcz business men have again
demonstrated their faith in the fu
ture of their hining district by bond
ing the group of claims in the Teikel
district known as "Terias"-Pontus
property. The price paid was $5,000
cash and balance of $4,500 payable in
three years. A. Y. Tuttle and Chas.
Crawford were the promoter of the
deal. This property Ib recognized as
one of the richest In that section, and
was brought to prominence last spring
at the time of the famous Teikel '
stampede when Valdez business men
subscribed $30,000 in two days to
bond the Ross-Garwood property.
Juneau Deal in
Real Estate
Jas. Fitzgerald today sold the lot
adjoining W. R. Will's store on Frank
lin street, to Judge Thos. R. Lyons,
Ralph Robertson and John Mullen.
The pirce paid is $5,500, which is an
increase of over 100 per cent in the
cost price to Mr. Fitzgerald.
The purchasers regard their buy
as an investment and it it their in
tention to erect a building on the plot
of ground early next spring.
GEORGIA'S OUTGOING LIST.
The Georgiawas scheduled to sail
for Sitka at 4 p. ra. today, with the
following passengers: Thos. Fisher,
Mr. and Mrs. H. Van Erman, Jean
Kenson, D. McLaud, Peter Martin, A.
Kunkle, Henry Moses, for Tenakee;
H. Scott, Mike McGuinn, P. Regan,
VVm. Alkcns, for Sitka.
A big lot of machinery for the
Alaska-Gastineau Company, includ
ing parts for the Salmon creek pow
er station, arrived on the Alki this
morning.
Alfred LundBtrom has accepted the
position of assistant to the new city
wharfinger, L. C. Cherry.
SPOKANE DEPARTURES.
/
The Spokane came in from the
North at 9:30 yesterday morning and
departed for the South at noon. The
following is the passenger list from
Juneau: A. Godman, Herb. Kittesley,
Mrs. C. Clark and son, R. H. Pollard,
J. A. Moore, Daisy Parker, Mae Wil
liams, M. Mayer and wife, Neil Ward
Alex and John Kaivealla, Ed Jacob
son, Hector McLean and wife, Henrj
States, John Nelson, V. A. Petersor
and wife, J. Nelson, C. Brennan, B. M
Davitt, B. H. McDonald, Albert Clin
i kinbeard, Pat Sheohan, Tommy John
: son, Sally and Ruby Waltor.
I
Mr. Kohlhepp, of B. M. Behrends
? who underwent an operation at SI
? Ann's hospital for appendicitis, is rc
ported to be in a critical state.
TEN MILLION DOLLARS
AS A PENSION FUND
CHICAGO, Nov. 11. ? Elaborate
plana are In course of preparation by
the Bell Telephone Company, the
Western Union Telepraph Company, >
and the Western Electric Company :
whereby, it Is announced, that the
Bum of $10,000,000 will bo appropriat
ed by these corporations on Jan. 1
next as a permanent pension fund for
their employes, numbering 175,000.
TAFT WILL PUSH
TRUST PROSECUTIONS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1L?It is an-;
nounced by the Department of Jus- j I
tico that the administration will at11
once push all pending trust prosecu- <
tions to an immediate Ibsuo.
President Taft is anxious that all
:hese cases shall be disposed of or at
least passed on to the courts to de
cide, before he retires from office on
March 4 noxt.
N. Y. WOMEN SUFFRAGISTS
HAVE BIG PARADE
NI5W YORK, Nov. 10.?New York ,
was all agog today to witness the suf- !
fragc parade to celebrate the addition i
of four states to the suffrage flag?
the states of Kansas, Arizona. Michi
gan and Oregon.
A score of brass bands and 1G,000
women, with banners waving and
flags flying, walked or rode in car
riages, many prominent woman suf
fragists being in the parade, includ
ing Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont and Anna
II. Shaw and Harlet Stanton Bl&tch.
BANK BOOKKEEPER
ARRESTED; SUICIDES
SEATTLE, Nov. 10.?Arrested on
a charge of embezzling $400 from the
Dexter Horton National Bank, Allen I
P. Eld red, a bookkeeper of the bank
suicided today by taking poison. El
dred was a young man and was un
married. ' 1
WILSON'S DUTY TO STATE.
PRINCETON, N. J., Nov. 11.?
Governor Wilson considers that his
attention to tne affairs of New Jersey
is hiB immediate duty, and he has
announced that he will devote all thiB
week to the state's business.
FRIENDLY RELATIONS
ARE IMPROVING.
LONDON, Nov. 10. ? Winston
Churchill, first lord of the admiralty,
speaking at Guild Hall, on the ques
tion of German's naval preparations,
said that the relations between that
country and Great Britain were im
proving with every evidence of this
country's determination to maintain
naval supremacy. He added that the
best way to end rivalry was "to go
right on and prove that we cannot
be overtaken."
MARIPOSA'S LAST TRIP.
The Mariposa arrived in Juneau
from the westward at 2:30 p. m. yes
terday and departed at 3:30 south
bound. This is the last trip of the
season on the Inside run. The fol
lowing took passage front Juneau:
E. J. Jaeger, G. O. Bradley, G. A.
Forsyth and S. G. Hamlin.
JUNEAU PEOPLE SPEND
EVENING IN DOUGLAS.
A large crowd of Juneau young
young people went to Douglas last
night some taking in the perform
ance at the new Orpheum and many
went to Brown & Armstrong's rink
and skated the evening away.
HALIBUT SHIPMENTS.
Longshore Boss 0. E. Head had a
gangB towing fresh halibut on the
Spokane yesterday, 75 cases In all.
There were 25 cases on the City dock
, to be sent on tu? Alkl today.
Denny Orfanos, the hustling shoe
? maker of Douglas, was in Juneau
' this morning.
' Capt Guptill, a well known Alaska
1 mariner, now in command of the Al
? ki, was in town today and made a
? pleasant call at The Empire oflice.
Jack McDonald, a well known
Douglas business man was in town
today. x
Mr. Johnson, of the Johnson-Erick
. son Mining Company, of Valdcz, was
h a pascengcr on the Mariposa, bound
for the East.
3LACK JACK JOHNSON
GROWS LOQUACIOUS
CHICAGO, Nov. 11.?Jack Johnson,
rho is In Jail here In default of |30,
00 bail on an indictment charging
.bite slavery, said at breakfast this
uorning that he would marry the
:araeron girl If he had to Berve forty
ears first. After he had breakfast he
end the Bible and later sent for a
Life of Napoleon."
OBJECTS TO JACK.
CHICAGO, Nov. 10. ? The white
>risoners in the Cook County Jail
iave protested against the presence
if Jack Johnson and ask that he be
emoved to the negro section of the
ail. Johnson has a murderer as a
:ellmate. His attorneys will appeal
othe United States Supreme court
n an effort to secure Johnson's re
ease on ball.
fOUNG JUNEAU
COUPLE MARRIED.
SEATTLE, Nov. 11. ? Frederick
fohn Wettrlck and Miss Mary Ma
ony, both of Juneau, were married on
Saturday evening at the New Wash
ngton hotel, by Rev. H. H. Gowen, of
rrinity Episcopal church. Bishop
ilowe, who was to have performed
he ceremony arrived too late. Mr.
ind Mrs. Wettrlck will upend their
loneymoon in California.
WILSON MEMORIAL SERVICES.
SEATTLE, Nov. 11.?Memorial ser
vices were held in this city yester
day in houor of the late Senator
John L. Wilson, whose funeral took
place at Crawfordsville, Ind., his old
home.
HAINES MILL BURNED.
HAINES, Nov. 10.?The Combs
Lumber Company's sawmill burned
at 12 o'clock last night entailing a
heavy loss.
Oiliccrs aboard the Spokane arrived
in Juneau Sunday morning reported
seeing the blaze, but could not de
termine the exact location of it.
REVOLUTIONISTS STILL ACTIVE
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 11.?A now
revolutionary manifesto has been Is
sued here suggesting the retirement
of President Madero and the election
of Gen. Gevonimo Trevino as presi
dent.
VICE PRESIDENT CORRAL DEAD.
NOGALES, N. M., Nov. 11.?A telo
gram has been received hero an
nouncing the death of P.amon Cor
ral, vice president of Meklco, under
President Diaz. Senor Corral died in
Paris.

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