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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 22, 1912, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. 1. NO. 18. JUNEAU, ALASKA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22. 1912. PRICE 10 CENT8.
CHINA READY TO ATTACK RUSSIA
THE STATUS Of THE TIDE
LANDS Of THIS TERRITORY
The matter of acquiring tide lands:
in Coast states and their status in1
Maska is clearly set fortli by I? T.
Merry. C. K.. of this city in the fol-i
lowing statement prepared for Thel
Daily Krnpire:
"As regards the acquisition of the ^
tide lands in front of Juneau, perhaps
I am qualified to throw some light up- j
on the subject, having held the posi
tion of State engineer for the survey
of the tide lands of Kitsap County,
Wash..
"Congress gave to all of the states
bordering the Pacific Ocean, includ
ing. of course, all inland navigable
waters flowing to the sea. the land
between high and mean low waters,
and the state, through its legislature,
appointed three commissioners for
each county; also provided for the
appointment, by these commissioners,
of competent engineers to make the
necessary surveys. When the survey
was completed the "commissioners of
appraisement" examined the lands,
fixed their value, and in due time the
sale of the same was advertised. But
the law gave the upland cwner the
r
prior right of purchase at the ap
praised value, giving him six months
to declare his intention. If he failed
to make good, the lands fronting his
property were knocked down to the
highest bidder. Grounds suitable for
the propagation of oysters, were ex
empted; also natural oyster beds, but,
the selection was left with the com
missioners.
"Now, while It would be a great
advantage to Juneau if these lands
could be improved. I do not believe
that while this is a territory, the gov
erning authority would yield these
lands to Juneau for any purpose, since
such a privilege must necessarily
give equal right to all other coast
towns, even without the asking.
There is no doubt but what Congres?
will grant these lands to Alaska when
she becomes a state, but it is hard
ly likely while the affairs are admin
istered by a Secretary of the Interior.
But it would be the part of wisdom
for the territorial legislature to start
the matter going, and keep the sub
ject warm before our solons at Wash
ington."
Alaska's Salmon Pack
Over 3,000,000 Cases
According to Seattle advices the
Alaska salmon pack will be more than
3,000,000 cases for the season, the
largest in ten years, hurry-up orders
from Kastern buyers and a growing
Oriental export trade, the salmon mar
ket is manifesting a firmness which,
it is asserted, spells higher prices on
or about January 1.
The pack this year, it is expected,
will be the largest on record, the
nearest approach being last year,
with 2.S21.317 cases. The pack has
almost steadily increased since 1902,
varying during the last ten years
from 2.500.000 cases up to 2.SOO.OOO
cases.
Reports from the various Alaska
canneries are being compiled as fast
as received, and the actual pack will
be known in a short time. Leading
dealers, however, agree that the pack
will reach 3.000.000 cases of Alaskans
alone. To this will be added more
than 300.000 cases of Puget Sound
salmon, which is regarded as a light
year, and 15.000 cases of Columbia
river fish.
Few of the buyers in the East were
able to anticipate the strong demand
that would arise for the new food
product, and early in the season sal
mon stocks were laid in on the basis
of shipments from Puget Sound sat
mon centers late in December. Dur
ing the last week these orders have
been renewed undr "hurry-up" instruc
tions. and Washington dalers have
been busy getting the orders out.
Foreign Demand Increasing.
In the meantime the overseas de
mand is increasing, with orders com
ing in from all world ports. The visi
ble supplv for the packing season of
1912 already threatens to be ab
sorbed. and the first symptoms of
a stiffness in the market was shown
in Alaska pinks.
Dealers do not contend that there
will be any increase in prices at pres
ent. but in view of the rapid absorp
tion into trade of all salmon in hand,
an advance is likely before January 1.
Heavy shipments of the fish are go
ing to Chicago, where the retail price
is three cans for 25 cents. At these
figures the Alaska and Puget Sound
salman is rapidly taking the place of
meat as food staple.
HALIBUT SHIPMENTS.
The shipments of fresh halibut from
the City dock between Oct. 1 and
Oct. 21. inclusive totaled 274 boxes
The shipment from .^'ov. 4 to Nov. 21.
inclusive, were 394 boxes, or a grand
tc al of 66S boxes.
R. C. Briggs will leave for Hoonah
on the Georgia tomorrow morning.
AN ELECTION CONTEST
IN LOS ANGELES.
LOS ANGELES. Cal.. Nov. 22. ?
The contest over the returns of the
late election in Los Angeles County
will be taken to the appellate court,
on behalf of President-elect Wilson.
Tom Nagei a
Habitual Criminal
The United States marshal's office
this morning received notice frcm
Deputy Schnabel, of Wrangel to the
effect that Tom Nagel was again un
der arrest on the same old charge ot
peddling whiskey to Indians. This
makes five times he has answered to
that complaint.
His third conviction for this offense
occurred over two years ago and he
received a two-years' sentence for the
crime. His attorney took an appeal
to the circuit court of Calofornia and
got a reversal of the verdict of the
lower court on the ground that dis
trict attorney did not prove in the
trial that the persons to whom he
gave the liquor were Indians within
the meaning of the law provided for
such cases. But in the meantime Na
gle served two years in prison pend
ing the decision of the higher court.
His fourth conviction resulted in a
seuteuce of 30 days, presumably be
cause he had just finished serving an
illegal term of two years.
Now he is held the fifth time for
this offense?it is getting to be a
chronic complaint but keeps the dep
uty down there in practice.
JUDGE LYONS TO
GO NEXT WEEK
Judge Thomas R. Lyons, of the
district court, expects to leave for
Valdez on the steamer Yukon, which
is due here from Seattle next Tues
day or Wednesday. The judge will
be accompanied by Mrs. Lyons.
Judge Lyons states that he does
not know how long the term of court,
which he will hold at Valdez, will
last, but it will probably be six weeks
or two months.
Judge Peter D. Overfleld, who will
preside at the term beginning Dec.
9, is expected to arrive on the Mari
posa. due here from Cordova next
Monday.
A GOOD WORD
FOR SITKA SPRINGS.
W. A. Hesse, the well known civil
engineer and United States deputy
mineral land surveyor, returned on
the Georgia this morning from Sitka
Hot Springs. Mr. Hesse reports that
he had a good time while at the
Springs. He says Doctor Goddard is
a companionable host and that he has
provided every comfort for guests of
the place. The place is not crowded
at present.
Mr. Hesse will remain here for sev
eral days, but contemplates going
South soon.
Hot chill beans all the time at
Lockie McKinnon's Mayflower. tf.
E. A. Quan, C. O. Quan and S. A.
Quan are a trio of brothers from
Treadwell embarked on the south
bound Princess May this morning.
Subscribe for The Daily Empire.
DEATH OF
A. NADEAU
A. W. Nadeau received u telegram
todny stating that his brother Alex.
Nadeau died at Providence hospital,
Seattle, last night. The body will bo
shipped to Juneau on the Humboldt,
sailing from Seattle tomorrow night.
The immediate cause of M.r Nadeau's
death was heart failure. He left
here about two weeks ago for treat
ment at the Seattle hospital. H's
wife and thtee children reside here.
Mr, Nadeau was foreman ut tho
Perseverance mine and had resided
here since 1896. and he had many
friends in Southeastern Alaska. He
was 46 years old.
Servians Mind
Is Made Up
?
PARIS, Nov. 22. ? The Belgrade.;
Servia, correspondent of the Daily1
Matin says that the state of mind of
the Servian people Is this: "We'
want ports on the Adriatic, and wo
will go to war with Austria if it is
necessary to get them."
i
DIGGS ACQUITTED
AT CORDOVA
CORDOVA. Nov. 23?The jury in
the case of the United States against i
Joseph F. Diggs, 011 trial here before 1
Judge Overfield today returned a ver- 1
diet of not guilty. When the verdict '
was announced there was a big dent- 1
onstration in the court room, which t
was crowded with interested specta
tors among them many friendsof the 1
defendant, who were enthusiastic
over Diggs' acquittal.
Diggs was the first postmaster of
Cordo/a, and he was placed under 1
arrest about a year ago. after an in- <
vestigation of the postoillce inspect- '
ors. 1
Shortage in the funds was charged,
but Diggs' friends claimed that hrt 1
was not guilty. He was released 011 ?
bail and recently returned to Cordova
to undergo trial.
MARRIED IN
HASTE; REPENTS j
1
CHICAGO. Nov. 22.?Mrs. Robert '
S. Givens, a divorced society womai 1
and a former Detroit beauty, recent
ly eloped to Indiana and married u 1
man who had represented himself '
as Edward B. Kirkman, son of Mar- '
shall Kirkman, a former president of (
the Chicago & Northwestern Rail
road.
But Mrs. Givens' illusion has been
dispelled. Instead of her husband be
ing the son of a millionaire he turns I
out to be William Boehm, Edward :
B. Kirwman's chaffeur. Mrs. Givens- 1
Boehm will again seek the divorce 1
court. i
INDICTED TRUST I
OFFICIAL IS DE/ O. .
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 22. ?Theo- <
dore Zurburgg, head of the watch case
trust, who was indicted a short time 1
ago is dead of heart failure.
I
MEXICAN REBELS
CAPTURE A TOWN 1
EL PASO, Tex.. Nov. 22.?News re
ceived here from Palomas a border 1
town of Mexico, states that the reb
els have captured the town and loot
ed some of the stores and other build
ings.
CHINA IS SURELY
PREPARING FOR V>?R.
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 22. ? Ca
blegrams from China received here
by prominent Chinese announce that
China is rapidly preparing for a war
with Russia.
A. Arnstadt, a well knokn mining
man of Sum Dum, arrived in Juneau ,
hhvlng traveled up in his launch.
W. R. Nichols will leave for Gyp- i
sum on the Georgia tomorrow. i
DRIVE BULGARIANS BACK
FOR FOUR MILES
1)
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 22. ?
Bulgarian forces retreated yesterday
a distance of four miles, to the
trenches outside of the Tchatalja for
tifications.
Terms Were Impossible.
LONDON. Nov. 22. ? The TurkiBh
Grand Vizor in an interview with the
Constantinople correspondent of the
Daily Mail, said:
"The peace terms offered by the
allies were simply impossible. The
Bulgarians asked for the surrender of
Adriauople, Scutari, Janina and the
Tchatalja line of forts."
Turkish Cruiser Blown-Up.
SOFIA, Bulgaria, Nov. 22?A Bul
garian torpedo boat is reported to
have blown up the Turkish cruiser
liamidleh, at Yarnn in the Black sea.
Many Turks are said to have perished
in the explosion.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 22. ?
Nazim Pasha, commander-in-chief of
the Turkish army telegraphs the war
office as follows: "The Bulgarian
army has fallen back to certain points
four ami a half miles distant.. Many
deud have been found In the Bulgar
ian trenches.
American Cruisers at Gibraltar.
GIBRALTAR, Nov. 22.?The Uniteu
States criusers Montana und Tennes
see have arrived here, en route to
Constantinople.
Both Sides Claim Victory.
CONSTANTINOPLE. Nov. 22. ?
The battle along the whole length of
the Tchatalja lines has been resumed,
failing the negotiations to bring
about an armistice.
Both the Bulgarians and the Turku
claim the victory in the naval en
gagement off Varna, on the Black
sea.
The Greel: forces have occupied
Fioreica and have cut off thirty thous
and Turks who were retreating from
Monastir.
ROOT APPEALS TO
PEOPLE OE NATION
NEW YORK, Nov. 22? United
States Senator Ellhu Root in a
speech at a banquet here lntst night
made a fervent appeal to the nation
to keep faith with Great Britain in
the matter of Panama canal tolls,
hie urged that the subject be sumltted
to arbitration.
CONFESSED MURDER
OF HIS STEPFATHER.
PORTLAND, Or., Nov. 22. ? Glen
Llalt, a boy nineteen years old, to
lay surrendered to the police stating
that he had murdered his stepfather,
D. M. Leltzell, and buried the body.
DISREGARD THE
CABINET MAKERS;
HAMILTON. Bermuda. Nov. 22?In
in interview here yesterday, I'resi
lent-elect Wilson said, with reference
to the work of cabinet-makers in the
United States: "All the statements
nade about my selections for my cab
inet may be disregarded until I make
the announcement myself."
Governor Wilson is chiefly resting
lore, and taking in the numerous
ilaces of interest on the island. He
ins made no announcement as to the
luration of his stay.
THE KIRMSE FUNERAL.
The funeral of the late Herman D.
\irinse will be held here following the
irrlval of the body. The obsequies
will be under the direction of the
Benevolent and Protective Order of
Elks of which Mr. Kirmse was a
cherished member. Other orders
that will likely participate are the
Arctic Brotherhood and the Fratern
al Order of Eagles, in both of which
deceased was an esteemed member
A great many people will come from
Skagway to attend the funeral. It
is expected that they will arrive on
the Spokane. Interment will be In
the Elks' plot of ground, overlooking
the channel.
Ladles furs for Holiday .trade. W.
H. Case. tf
THE SALE CONTINUES.
The Ladies' Altar Society Sale has
Ijeen a success and quite n sum has
been realized, but there remain manv
choice articles of fancy work and
some potted plants, so a "left over"
sale will continue until Saturday eve
ning. Mrs. Berry won the doll that
was raffled last night.
COAL STEALING CASE
HAS BEEN CONTINUED.
Red Lewis who was arrested for
stealing coaland brought for trial be
fore Judge Winn of the commission
pr's court, has had his case contin
ued and !b out on hiB own recogniz
ance.
Schranck Is Now
In Insane Asylum
MILWAUKEE, Nov. 22. ? John
Schrnnk, who shot Colonel Theodore
Roosevelt In this city on the night of
Oct. 14, was committed to the Insane
asylum at Oshkosh today. A com
mission of Ave alienists nad prev
iously pronounced Sschrank insane.
TO CARRY MATERIAL
IN FOREIGN VESSELS.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 22?To pre
vent delay in the completion of the
Panama canal the Interstate Com
merce Commission has modified its
ruling so as to permit foreign vessels
to deliver material for canal con
struction.
MADERO BLAMES
NEWSPAPERS
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 22.?At a ban
quet given here last night President
Francisco I. Madero In a speech that
bristled with bitterness declared that
tho newspaper press were largely re
sponsible for the ills that have been
brought upon Mexico. He declared,
however, that the nation would sur
vive, and that rebellion was virtual
ly extinct.
B. 'Stewart, of the Alaska-Juneau.
was in town for a few hours this
morning and returned to the mine this
afternoon.
Typewriters for rent. W. H.
Case. tf
Fred Garner and wife left on the
Princess May this morning for a four
weeks' stay in Sound cities. Mr. Gar
ner lias had trouble with his eyeB and
is going out for treatment.
Alex Sutherland took passage on
the Princess May.
THE VALENTINE BUILDING.
In connection with the story that
he contemplated improving his prop
erty on Front and Seward streets,
Mr. Valentine says: "The plans have
been drawn, but not the specifica
tions. It is probablo that the build
ing will cost considerably more than
$12,000. I expect to build by day la
bor under competent architectural su
pervision. The construction will be
gin as soon as the frost is out of the
ground and will be rushed to comple
tion. I have had many applications
from prospective tenants and know
it will pay from the start.
WILL LIVE IN JUNEAU.
Mr. Harry Morton, of Douglas, who
was married to Miss lone. Elizabeth
McDonald of the same place last
Tuesday was in Juneau this morn
ing looking for apartments.
It is the intention of Mr. and Mrs.
Morton to make their home in Ju
neau.
CHINESE TROOPS READY TO
MARCH AGAINST RUSSIA
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 22?Sixty
thousand Chinese troops have been
mobilized in Pokin and are in readi
ness to inarch to Mongolia and re
establish Chinese rule in that coun
try, and drive out the Russians.
This statement Is contained in a
cablegram received hero by Yow
Gook, private secretary to Fung Chi
You, secretary of state in President
Yuan's cabinet. General Wong Hing
is in command of the mobilized
troops.
A special from Pckin to the Chi
nese Kdce Press confirms the cable
gram, and adds further that the gov
ernment has already dispatched fifty
thousand troops to Mongolia to pro
tect the people who have opposed the
ratification of the convention between
Russia and Mongolia.
LONDON, Nov. 22.?The Daily Tel
egraph's Ppkin correspondent tele
graphs that the Chinese Mongolian
expedition will advance in three
widely-separated columns which will
ultimately converge at Urga.
HUNDREDS Of LIVES SNUFFED
OUT IN JAMAICA HURRICANE
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Nov. 22.?The
i
details of the hurricane and tidal;
wave which destroyed two towns and
wrecked another last Tuesday, are
now heinp received, and the loss of
life, and damage to property at the
northern end of the inland are much
greater than was first reported.
The dead will number hundreds,
many of them having been killed in
the hurricane that swept over Monte
go bay, and there has been also a
great loss to shipping.
EARTHQUAKE WRECKS MEXICAN TOWN
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 22.?Acambay I
a town in northern Mexico is in ruins,
due to an earthquake last Tuesday,
which demolished the entire town, J
the exception of a very few building*, i
Sixty dead bodies have been rccov.
ered and removed to a church. Many
more are still in the wreckaKe, and
many hundreds of men, women and
children were injured.
URGES EFFECTIVE NAVAL FORCE
OTTAWA, Ont., Nov. 22?The Ca
nadian parliament was opened here
today with great ceremony by th?
Duke of Connaught, the governor
general. In his speech to parliament
the duke urged that Canada should
aid in the upbuilding of the lmpcriul
navy, saying that "conditions have
been disclosed which in my opinion
and in the opinion of my advisers,
render it imperative that the navai
forces of the empire should be effec
tively strengthened without delay."
WANTS PENSIONS FOR EX-PRESIDENTS
NEW YORK. Nov. 22.?The trus
tees of the Carnegie Foundation a'
their recent meeting here made pro
vision for an annual pension of of
?25,000 for future cxpresidents and
their widows, so long as they remain
unmarried. It is claimed that there
was much discussion In the board be
fore the provision was agreed to, It
being urged that to create such a pen
sion fund might cause unmerited
criticism, and provoke unfavorable
comment.
DINE WITH THE
FRIEND Of WILSON'
SAVANAH, Ga., Nov. 22.?William
Jennings Bryan and William P. Mo
Combs, chairman of the Democratic
national committee, who is here re
cuperating his health, dined Inst
night at the home of Gen. Pleasant
A. Stovall, a life-long friend of Pres
ident-elect Wilson.
I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I fr
f Marine Notes i;
... i . f.i i n i i i i i | | | | | | | | | | | |*
The cableship Burnnidc raised an
chor and departed during the night.
All the llshing craft in the harbor
are hugging the moorings today.
The Princess May arrived from
Skagway nt 3 o'clock this morning
an dleft an hour later.
The lighthouse tenuer Columbine
left for Eidred Rock last night.
The Spokane is due from Skagway
late tonight or early tomorrow morn
ing.
The Yukon is due to arrive in Ju
ueau from the South on November 26.
The Alki is due early next week.
The Humboldt will arive on Novem
ber 27.
Many fishing boats are out and ex
pected in any minute.
The Georgia is due tonight from
SkagwaV and will leave at 8 a. m. to
morrow for Sitka. She will stop at
Tyee and Baranoflf on this trip.
SPECIAL at Goldstein's tomor
row?Bananas 25 and 30 cents a doz.
L. J. Reedy, of the Alaska-Gastin
eau labor bureau, returned last night
from a trip to Perseverance.
SEAL OF SILENCE
PUT ON RUSSIANS
ST. PETERSBURG, Nov. 22.?That
Russia is making active military prep
arations so as to be ready when the
expected European war conflagara
tlon breaks out lias been apparent
for some time. The Russian press
has been warned not to make com
ment upon these war preparations, and
strict injunctions have been issued by
I the Czar to all Russian otiicers against
[ talking about the work of mobiliza
| tion or anything else of a military
j character.
EARTHQUAKE SHOCKS
FELT AT VANCOUVER.
VANCOUVER, B. C., Nov. 22.?Two
distinct shocks of an eailhquake were
felt here last night at five o'clock,
creating not a little excitement for
some minutes afterwards.
THE MOOSE CALL.
Tonight, at the call of the Moose, a
large crowd will congregate in Moose
hall for a good time socially. There
will be music songs and dancing.
The short business session is called
for 7:30 sharp?no initiation?social
begins at 9 o'clock.
TRIAL OF WOMAN MURDERER.
AUGUSTA, Mo.. Nov. 21.?The trial
of Mrs. Elsie Hobbs Raymond,
charged with the murder of Miss Mat
tie Hackett, in 1905, was begun here
today.
Beer made in a church, .at Lockie
McKinnon's tf.

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