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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 25, 1912, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
, VOL. 1. NO. 20. JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, NOVEMBER, 25, 1912. PRICE 10 CENT8.
CENTER OF THE HALIBUT INDUSTRY
GREAT IMPROVEMENTS AT
THE PERSEVERANCE MINE
No adequate conception of the de
velopment work that has been done in
tlte past six months, and under way
at the present time, in the immediate
environs of Juneau, is possible with
out visiting the points of physical ac
tivity.
A journey to the Perseverance mine
brings forth many surprises. Super
intendent George T. Jackson has cer
tainly been doing things in his divis
ion of the Alaska-Gastineau Com
pany's big project. Besides operat
ing the mill while the water and pow
er supply was available a tremendous
amount of development work has been
done.
The East Drift.
The old Alexander tunnel, which
leads to the surface, has been widen
ed four feet with a raise of two feet,
giving a passage of ten by eight fee'.
This work is completed for a distance
of 2.200 feet when the tunnel termin
ates.
At the terminal of this tunnel a
working or hoisting station has been
made. 30x150 and ten feet high.
Prom this station the main shaft runs
to the surface 940 feet. This old
shaft is being widened to bo 5x14
feet in the clear. Two hundred feet
of this work is already done.
Prom this same station another
main shaft of the same dimensions is
being sunk 625 feet to tap the tun
nel now being driven from Sheep
creek. This was but recently start
ed and a depth of 24 feet has been I
reached. Here. too. a footwall or? i
shute 6x12 feet, going into the foot
wall at an angle of 62 degrees for a
distance of 100 feet, is finished.
Main Tunnel.
The main east drift has been wid
ened out to 12x10 feet, for a dis
tance of 400 feet and re-timbered
on the double timber syeiem. " The |
work of enlarfging will continue to;
the end of the old drift. This old;
drift has had a full sized extenslor
of 400 feet added to It making the
tunnel 1.700 feet long. In this tun
nel are the ore shutes now or lately
in use and the stopes above have ap
parentlv hundreds of thousands ol
tons of ore broken down ready for
milling. No stoping is in progress
now, however, on account of the mill
being closed.
More Drills Busy.
The new 8-lnch air pipe has been
laid, having a capacity for 30 ma
chines and the power will be turned
on tomorrow or next day from Sheep
creek furnishing the compressors with
air for 26 machine drills.
Surface Work.
A new carpenter shop, fitting shop
and machine shop have been built.
A service pipe line has been laid for
fire protection to the buildings and
for camp supply. A new surface tram
has been built with elevation to clear
all snow fall.
The men's Quarters have been fixed
up: steam heat and electric light in
each room.. The ground has been
cleared for the men's new club bulla
ing which will be erected as soon as
the lumber arrives.
The Oranlte creek pipe line was
finished two days ago. This will furn
ish water for the mill battery and
other purposes.
The new Chilian mill is on the
ground and will be set up during the
winter and be ready for operation next
summer. It will be used in milling
the oversize that is usually sent back
to the crusher.
There are about 150 men employed
in the camp at the present time, but
the number will be increased when
the mill starts again, which will he
as soon as the Salmon creek power
Is available. The men's Quarters and
camp buildings will have acommoda
tion for 200 men.
Kirmse Funeral
Tuesday Afternoon
The funeral of the late Herman D.
Kirmse will be held tomorrow after
noon at 2:00 o'clock from Elks' hall
under the auspices of the Elks. The
body will arrive from Ketchikan on
the Alki this evening. Interment will
be in Elks' Rest at the Juneau ceme
tery.
PROPHESIED HONOR
TO WOODROW WILSON.
JO MET. UL. Nov. 22.?"Be careful
of this, for when he gets to be presi
dent of the United States you will
prize it."
With this prophetic injunction. Mrs. j
Mary Russel. a cultured and educated
teacher and governess, handed her
younger brother. John ('. Baker, of
.Manhattan. 111., a little fret-saw frame
which Woodrow Wilson designed and
made for her over forty years ago,
when he was a pupil at the Tileston
school at Wilmington. N. C. It was;
fifteen years ago. when she broke up
her home in Manhattan and returned
to her old home in North Carolina,
that she handed the frame to her
brother.
Mr. Baker has preserved the little
frame and has remembered the pro
phecy. The sister died three yars
ago at LeehcviUe. N.C. However, she
was just as confident of its fufilment
as Mr. Baker is now that it is practi
cally accomplished.
NOTICE TO MASONS.
There will be a regular communi
cation of Mt. Juneau Lodge No. 147.
Monday evening. November 25.
Work in Master Mason's degree. All
sojourning brothers are invited.
W. W. CASEY. W. M. 2t.
ADAM AND EVE.
Adam and Eve had trouble Satur
day night. They started across the
channel but there was something
wrong with Eve?the "g" string
wouldn't work, compelling a return
to the dock. Adam Is the United
States game warden and Eve is the
launch he uses.
Subscribe for The Daily Empire.
HAYES ESTATE
PROPERTY SOLD
The water front property belonging
to the Jack Hayes estate was sold
at auction by the administrator
Jatnes Fitzgerald at 10 o'clock this
morning on the court house steps,
j There were two bidders, John Clark
and Mrs. James Fitzgerald. Clark
i bid $2,350 and Mrs. Fitzgerald offered
$2,400 and accordingly was awarded
the purchase.
N. L. Burton, of Winn & Burton,
acting for the city protested the sale
on the ground that the notice of sale
had not been posted as required by
law. and that Mrs. Fitzgerald's bid
should not be accepted, she being the
wife of the administrator of the es
tate.
The property in question has fifty
feet frontage on Franklin street and
a depth of 147 feet to the water front,
'^adjoins the City dock on the south. 1
.
INHERITED MONET
GETS A PARDON
TACOMA. Nov. 24.?Henry Gable,
serving a sentence in the state peni
tentiary for robbing has been par
doned by Governor Hay under pecul
iar circumstances. Gable's father 1
died a few months ago leaving an es
tate valued at $200,000, of which the
son was given one-third.
<
BISHOP HOFFMAN DEAD. !
PHILADELPHIA. Nov. 24.?Bishop '
Hoffman, of the Reformed Episcopal
Church, is dead at the age of 69.
HOSPITAL NOTES.
Harry Jordan, who was received at
St. Ann's hospital following a paraly- ,
tic stroke. Is getting along nicely. <
A1 Carlson, who was in a critical <
state following an operation, is im- ]
proving and growing stronger. i
Mrs. John Harris was brought to <
St. Ann's today suffering from appen
dicitis.
Mrs. Femmer is getting along nice
ly today.
Mrs. Fred Stackpole. of Wrangel, ,
is resting comfortably at St. Ann's j
NATIONAL PRESS MEETING. j
CHICAGO. Nov. 23.?The next
meeting of the American National
Press Association will be held at Col- (
orado Springs,, June 15, 1913. (
INCREASE
OF WAGES
i
>
? WASHINGTON, Nov. 25. ? Th<
' board of arbitration, sitting in Wash
? Ington. has decided to increase tin
wages of thirty thousand locomotive
' engineers on fifty Eastern railroads
HOLD JUBILEE
OE PRAYER
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 25. ? Five
hundred women, delegates to the
suffrage convention held in this city
yesterday held n prayer jubilee, led
by Bishop Rhlnelander, of the dio
cese of Pennsylvania, in celebration
of the suffrage victories this year in
Arizona. Kansas. Michigan and Ore
gon.
CHINA WINST
A_VICT0RY
CHICAGO, Nov. 25.?A special ca
ble to the Daily News says that the
Chinese Pekin expedition has taken
Uliassui, in Mongoliu, and that the
Russians arc advancing upon Urga.
AN HONOR FOR
STRIKE LEADER
ROME, Nov. 25.?The societies of
this city have nominated as a mem
ber of the chamber of deputies, Ar
turio Giovauaitti, one of the- lahor
leaders in the Lawrence, Mass., tex
tile strike, and now on trial at Salem
in that state, on a charge of being
accessary to the murder of Anna Ix>
pizzo, at Lawrence.
Debs Arrested;
Tampering Charge
GIRARD, Has., Nov. 25. ? A war
rant has been issued by the federal
court for this district for the arrest
of Eugene V. Debs, late candidate for
president of the United tSatcs on he
Socialist ticket.
Debs has been indicted on a charge
of tampering with a witness in the
case of the United States against the
Appeal to Reason, a Socialist news
paper published at Glrard.
INDICTED FOR
GIVING REBATES
PUEBLO, Col., Nov. 24?The fed
eral grand Jury in session hero has
returned indictments against the Den
ver & Itio Grande railroad, and the
Colorado Southern railroad on
charges of granting rebates to the
Colorado Fuel Company and fifteen
>ther concerns doing business in this
state. The Colorado Fuel and other
:ompanies have also been indicted for
lcceptlng rebates.
EARTHQUAKE ROCKS
SAN FRANCISCO HOMES.
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 25.?This I
jity was visited by three earthquake
shocks last night at nine o'clock.
Homes were rocked, but no damage
kvns done.
RAILROAD MAN KILLED.
ST. PAUL, Minn., Nov. 25.?Howard
lames Samuel Plechner, vice presi- ,
lent and purchasing agent of the
Croat Northern railway, was killed
lore yesterday, when an automobile
n which he was riding struck an ob
struction and turned turtle. ,
KILLED IN THEATRE PANIC. 1
BALBOA, Spain. Nov. 25.?A fire, i
vhich started here in a moving i
picture theatre yesterday, created a I
panic and caused the death of fifty (
people. (
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. A. Strong were
linner guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. Z. i
Cheney on Sunday evening. i
EUROPE
ARMING
LONDON, Nov. 25.?Russia, Aus
1 trla, Germany and Italy have two mil
" lion soldiers mobilized.
' France has called out her re
> sorvlsts.
Austrian battleships In the Bospor
us have sailed for the Adriatic sea.
The Russians are advancing or
Urga.
The peace plenlpolentaries met to
i day at Tchatalja.
LONDON, Nov. 26.?The beginning
of another week In the history of the
Balkan war but adds to the muddled
situation in Europe, the ond of which,
or the outcome, no one can predict.
Europe Beems to be a seething cal
dron of uncertainty. Half of the ar
mies of Europe aro being secretly
mobilized and prepared for Instant
service, in the general clash,
which is believed to De in
evitable over the division of Turkey.
Like vultures the European powers
are awaiting the final dissolution of
the "sick man of Europe," that thoy
may share in the spoil.
The chief interest of Europe now
ccnterB in the mobilization of armies
by Russia and Austria, the latter na
tion now having four hundred thous
and men under arms, while Russia
continues massing troops along the
frontier, with apparently feverish
haste.
Continental Europe Is honeycombed
with intrigue and the only nation that
seems to view the tangled situation
with equanimity is Great Britain.
GERMAN RESERVISTS
READY FOR FIELD.
LONDON. Nov. 24.?A dispatch to
the Daily Chronicle from Prague,.
Austria, says that Germany has or
dered 130,000 of the reservist troops
to hold themselves In readiness to
take the field.
It is also stated that Austria Is
enforcing a rigid press censorship
ALBANIA DECLARES
HER INDEPENDENCE.
VIENNA, Nov. 24.?A dispatch re
ceived here by the Reichpost, states
that Albania has declared her in
dependence. Albania has been a
province of Turkey for many years,
and has usually been a state ferment,
If not actual revolt.
TURKEY APPOINTS
MORE COMMISSIONERS.
CONSTANTINOPLE. Nov. 24. ?
Notwithstanding the fact that nego
tiations for peace between Turkey and
the Balkan states have been practi
cally broken off and histillties re
newed, Rechad Pasha, minister of
commerce, and Hadl Pasha, chief of
staff of the Turkish army, have been
appointed additional plenipotentiaries
to discuss peace terms with Bulgar
ia.
ITALY IS BOUND TO
STAND BY AUSTRIA.
ROME, Nov. 24.?It is Btated hero
officially that under the convention of
1899, between Italy and Austria, the
former considers herself bound to
stand by Austria in the Balkan sit
uation.
China Active in
War Preparations
SHANGHAI, Nov. 24. ?A dispatch
from Pekin says that the Chinese war
office is being kept open all night and
the greatest military activity is every
where apparent. The prospect of a
war with Russia, over Mongolia,
seems to have fired the new republic
with increased patriotism and fervor.
CONSTANTINOPLE. Nov. 25.?Ac
cording to the Turkish newspaper, Ik
lam, Turkey and the Balkan States
have agreed to a week's armistice.
Tho situation in Constantinople js
unchanged The ravages of cholera
continue almost unchanged, and food
Is becoming scarcer each day, many
cf the sources of supply having been
cut off by the Bulgarians.
The Daily Empire delivered in Ju
leau, Douglas and Treadwell for $1.00
i month.
AMAZING
1 FIGURES
WASHINGTON, Nov. 25.? Estimat
ing on a basis of ton months of the
present year the export and import
trade for 1912 will exceed four bil
w lion dollars, the greatest in the his
tory of the United States.
' VILLAGES RAZED
IN MEXICO
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 25.?A special
dispatch to the Mexican Herald, states
that twenty-five villages in the state
of Oaxaca have been destroyed by
federal troops as a means of stamping
out the revolution.
STRIKE LEADERS
ADDRESS COURT
SALEM, Mass., Nov. 24?Jacob J.
Ettor and Arturio Glvannltti, the lend
ers of the l^awrence, Mass., textile
strike last winter, and who have been
on trial here for many weeks, yester
day addressed the court in behalf
themselves and their comrade Caru
so, also on trial.
These men were Jointly indicted as
being accessories to the murder of
Anna Lopizzo, who was shot and
killed last spring In the streets of
Lawrence. In their address to the
court Ettor and Giovannitte said:
"If you think us guilty of murder
ing our sister, (Anna Lopizzo) give
us death. History will record our
end. We will go to a higher Judg
ment seat and millions of workers will
take up our flag of labor where we
dropped It In the ditch."
KNEELING IN PRAYER,
STARVED TO DEATH
CHICAGO, Nov. 24. ? Mtb. Julius
Miller, a widow, died of starvation in
a house on Halstcad street, in this (
city today. When found she was
kneeling as If In prnyer, with a babe
a few weeks old In her arms.
Erects Tablet to
Memory Mrs. Strauss
NEW YORK, Nov. 25.?A tablet to
the memory of Mrs. Isadore Straus ,
was unveiled here yesterday, by her ,
daughter, Mrs. Jacobs. The tablet |
bears testimony to the devotion of ,
Mrs. Straus in dying with her lius- i
bund. ,
On the night of April 14, last, when (
the ill-fated steamer Titanic was sink- j
ing, Mrs. Straus refused to leave her .
husband, and perished with him.
TWENTY-THREE INJURED \
IN TRAIN COLLISION.
1
SEATTLE. Nov. 24.?Twenty-three ,
persons were Injured yesterday when j
an Interurban train collided with a ;
passenger train on the Puget Sound
electric railroad.
HARVARD 20; YALE 0.
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Nov. 24.?In
the football game here on Saturday
afternoon between Harvard and Yale
the latter scored a disastrous defeaL (
the score being: Harvard, 20; Yale, 1
?. c
HUMBOLDT IS DUE
TOMORROW AFTERNOON. 1
SEATTLE, Nov. 24.?Steamer Hum- '
boldt sailed for Juneau Saturday aft
ernoon at one o'clock for Juneau.
Among her Juneau pasengers are 1
Robert W. Jennings, wife and daugh- v
ter; George E. James, Charles Nel- r
mee, H. Donnell and Isaac Burand,
and the body of the late Alexander I
Nadeau. Among the passengers for
Douglas are James Daniels and
James Davidson.
DR. SHAW RE-ELECTED.
I
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 25. ? Dr. t
Anna H. Shaw has been re-elected t
president of the National Equal Suf- I
frage League. t
IMPORTANCE Of THE
HALIBUT FISHING INDUSTRY
The businessmen of Juneau are be
ginning to express more interest in
the welfare of the fishing industry.
They are realizing that aside from
the fact that the town is the supply
point of many canneries that another
branch of the fishing business of con
siderable imporance has grown to
such prominence that the time has
come when some decided steps must
be taken to care for it or this entire
branch of the fishing indusry will be
transferred to other parts.
One business man who takes an ac
tlce interest said: "We are shipping
a tremendous lot of halibut, and as
The Empire has pointed out our fish
ermen are suffering great loss through
the culling system. This loss must
bo stopped. In my opinion it is up
to Juneau to build a cold storage
plant. If we haven't the money, then i
let the Commercial Club take up the j
matter and Interest outside capital.
"I have been collecting data," ho
continued, "and I find that we shipped
from the City dock from Oct 1 to
Nov, 21, 668 boxes of fresh halibut;
from the Juneau Fish & Ice Company
for the same period, I find that 490
boxes were shipped, making a grand
total of 1,158 boxes, or 579,000 pounds.
This is not so bad for seven weeks.
It seems to me this subject should
interest every business man in Ju
neau."
It is said that efforts are being
made to interest capital in the build
ing of a cold storage plant at Hoon
ah or Tenakee, and that if it suc
ceeds the fishing fleet will desert Ju
neau and take to the point that offers
the greatest advantages. Sitka too, it
is said, is bidding for a similar en
terprise with a fair chance of favor
able consideration.
TOLD TO BURN LOS ANGELES, CAL.
INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 25.?Ortlo K.
McManigal, on resuming his testi
mony in the dynamite conspiracy
cases, today testified that John J.
McNamara told him to burn I .ok An
geles off the map.
"Make it like San Francisco after
the earthquake," he said to McMan
igal, according to the latter's story.
CASE GOES
_TO JURY
SALEM, Mass., Nov. 25. ? Judge
Quinn today instructed the jury in
the Ettor-GfovanittI trial that the
only verdict that could be returned
against the defendants, If the Jury
found that they were guilty wai-njur
der in the second degree. Caruao,
the third defendant might be convict
ed in either the first or second degree.
ALASKA THE REAL
HOME OF MINERALS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 25.?A bulle
tin just issued by the United States
GeologlcalSurvey, prepared by Dr. Al
fred H. Hrooks, states that there arc
520 different kinds of ' minerals in
Alaska.
Mrs. Belmont Bolts
Suffrage Convention
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 24. ? The ]
National Woman's Suffrage conven- ?
tion, which has been in session here, I
:ias had a real sensation, and Mrs.
Oliver H. P. Belmont is a bolter.
When the question of women taking
i partisan attitude in politics came up
'or discussion Mrs. Belmont vigorous- \
y opposed it. Contending that worn
in suffragists should not ally them
selves with a political party. Jane'
Vddams, the noted Chicago settle
nent worker, led the opposition to j
Mrs. Belmont and won. Then Mrs. J
Uelmont walked out of the conven- i
ion. Miss Addams was active in thei
Progressive cause in the late cam
>algn.
rributes to the
Late Vice-President
NEW YORK, Nov. 25. ? Memorial j
jxerclses were held yesterday at the
Republican club in honor of the mem
iry of the late Vice President James
?. Sherman. In a letter to the club
^resident Taft said: "It is difficult
o mention the public life of a man
nore universally loved and who had
enderer and more steadfast friends.
D. J. Kinzie, manager of the la
lor department or the Alaska Tread
veil Company, was in town this aft
trnoon.
\LS0 PLANNED TO
BLOWUP CANAL
INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 25.?Contin
ling his testimony this afternoon in
he dynamite cases Ortt McManlgal
entitled that the McNamaras had
danned to dynamite the Panama
:anal.
ADAMS WILL GO
BACK TO "PEN"
SEATTLE, Nov. 24.?George E. Ad
ams, the paroled United States assay
ofllce thief, has been indicted by the
federal grand jury, on two counts
charging conspiracy to counterfeit.
After his parole from the peniten
tiary lost spring Adams became book
keeper for a motor car compuuy and
a few months later he was arrested
j In the shack of a notorious counter
feiter,, near Kent, Wash. Incriminat
ing letters were found in his posses
sion.
Will Select Site
for New Building
NEW YORK, Nov. 25.?The New
York state commissioners, who will
select a site for the New York build
in- at the Panama and Pacific inter
national Exposition, to be held in
191o, left for San Francisco yester
day. The commission Is headed by
Norman E. Mack, proprietor of the
Buffalo Times and former chairman
of the Democratic National Commit
tee.
HOCKINS' BAIL
IS DOUBLED
INDIANAPOLIS. Nov. 25.?The bail
of Frank Hockins, one of the men In
dicted In the dynamite conspiracy
cases, now on trial in thlB city, has
been doubled. Judge Anderson an
nouncing that he took thl3 action be
cause it had developed that Hockln
had deceived everyone. Hockin has
not procured the increased bail, and
has been imprisoned pending the se
curing of the additional bail.
SAN DOMINGO CONGRESS.
SAN DOMINGO, Nov. 25.?Con
gress has been called in special ses
sion on Nov. 26, when President Vic
toria will resign. And a series of
revolutions will bo in order.
SAM GOMPERS AGAIN
ELECTED PRESIDENT.
ROCHESTER, N. Y., Nov. 25. ?
Samuel Gompers has been re-elected
president of the American Federation
of Labor. The next convention will
bo held in Seattle, Wash.
SOMETHING new every day at the
WINTER & POND STORE. ???
OLD-TIMERS GOING OUT.
Ed Held, for a long time with the
Chas Goldstein Co.. and Lou Held,
his brother, of the Kensington mine
at Comet, will be leaving on the Al
kl tonight. Bill Cady, recently with
the Hoonah Packing Company, will
travel with the Held brothers.
They are traveling for pleasure
and business combined.

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