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The Alaska daily empire. (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 03, 1912, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. 1, NO. 26. JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1912. PRICE TEN CENTS
TAFT WARNS THE FOREIGN NATIONS
RUSSIA'S IMMENSE ARMY
ON THE POLISH FRONTIER
VIENNA. Dec. 3.?Aceordlug to the
Vienna Reichspost. Russia has con
centrated a half million troops behind
a semicircle of fortresses on the Pol
ish frontier.
A dlspaich from Constantinople
says tr.rt the Ottoman government
fully .vai zes that further resistance
can on'/ prejudice the position of
Turkey still more, whll * its outcome
would be extremely problematical,
and might lead to even more humilia
. tlon for Turkey, if such were possi
ble. The bulk ot public opinion has
rallied to the view taken responsible
; statesmen, and it is generally hoped
that the best possible conditions of
peace will be secured.
It is recognized that practically the
whole of European Turkey is lost,
and the government and other finan
cial interests are taking steps to safe
guard themselves when he final set
tlement comes up for discussion.
Money From
Forest Reserves
Governor Clark has had advices
from the Secretary of Agriculture, in
forming him that the last agricultur
al appropriation bill passed by Con
gress carried a provision that an ad
ditional ten per centum of all moneys
received from national forest reserves
should be expended for the building
and maintenance of roads and trails
within such respective forest re
serves.
The same communication advised
the Governor that under this provis
ion there was at the present time
available for use in the Alaska forest
reserve for the purposes mentioned
the sum of S4.67S.4S.
The Secretary of Commerce and
I.abor sought Gov. Clark's advice as
to the best method of getting the
most benefit out of this money.
The governor replied by advising
that the department take the matter
up with the Alaska Road Commission.
Through the provision of this act
it is believed that the roads running
through mining and agricultural sec
tion of the forest reserves will re
ceive material benefit.
JEWELRY proclaims the refine
ment, dignity and character of the
wearer. By the jewelry you wear you
are judged. The choicest assortment
of rich, fashionable Jewelry?the dig
nified. elegant kind?and all moder
ately priced at I. J. SHARICK S.
NEW YEAR'S EVE BALL.
The employees of the cyanide plant
at Treadwell are beginning to make
preparations for a ball to be given
on New Year's Eve. It promises to
be one of the most attractive affairs
ever held on the island.
AN ANCIENT NEWSPAPER
A copy of the Yukon Press, pub
lished Jan. 1, 1894. is a curiosity
which has been handed the Skagway
Daily Alaskan for filing among our
archives. It was originally published
at Fort Adams at the point where
Fort Yukon is now established, and
from the amount of religious matter
it contained was doubtless edited by
a missionary. The names of Bettles.
Beaumont. McQuesten and other
noted sourdoughs appear in its ad
vertising columns. The Press is no
longer published.
The district clerk's office force is
busy preparing the civic calendar for
the approaching term of court. There
are 73 civil cases now pending but it
is not likely that all reach the docket
will come to trial.
PRISONERS' SENTENCES
THAT HAVE EXPIRED.
R. O. Baker, formerly a soldier at
Fort Seward, was released today
from the federal jail, having served
a year's sentence for larceny. Baker
had been in the army for seventeen
years and bore an excellent record,
but in an evil moment he appropriated
some whiskey, while intoxicated, and
when arrested pleaded guilty. He has
been an exemplary prisoner and his
case has excited considerable sympa
thy.
Pedro Rodriguez, a Mexican, also
completed a term of twelve months
in the federal jail today. He was con
victed of peddling whiskey to natives.
The four months' sentence of Roman
Oomez. for larceny, will expire tomor
row.
The Dally Empire delivered in Ju
neau. Douglas and Treadwell for $1.00
a month.
Are Opposed to
the Ancient Rites
It is said that the younger genera
tion of natives in Auk village will pe
tition Governor Clark to use the in
rtueuce of his office for the purpose
of discouraging the practices of the
elders of the tribe an account of
wl.ich was recently published in The
Daily Empire.
The younger people are very sensi
tive on this subject and manifested
their displeasure in a signed state
ment appearing in The Dally Empire
on the day following the disclosures.
The young people very naturally in
this enlightened age want a cessa
tion of savage rites and customs and
the dancing and revelry accompany
ing such ceremonies.
The governor states that he has
not yet been applied to for assist
ance in the matter, but it is under
stood generally that a petition is be
ing prepared.
BONDSMEN SURRENDER
ILLICIT LIQUOR DEALER.
Antone De Grande the enterprising
man of Haines who was bound over
for selling liquor to Indians and out
on bail has been surrendered by his
bondsmen.
This is not the first time he has
been called to account for the same
offense. United States Deputy Mar
shal Harding will bring the man to
Juneau next week.
MERCHANTS READY FOR
THE CHRISTMAS TRADE.
The local merchants are receiving
and placing on display their Christ
mas and New Year stocks, and a
glance through them is sufficient to
show that the people of Juneau will
oe able to find almost everything in
the way of goods of all kinds, from
the most substantial to the delicate
and novel.
Royal Typewriters, for rent or sale,
\Y H. CASE, the Typewriter man. tf.
To Juneau patrons:
I wish to announce that I am pro
pared to give prompt and efficient
service in delivering, coal hauling
freight, baggage, etc.
HILARY McKANNA TRANSFER
Phone Order 5-7 or 55 tf '
NEW RULING AFFECTS
LOCAL STEAMERS.
Since the Titanic wreck a new rul
ing has gone into effect in relation to
the carrying capacity of vessels. Un
der this ruling the supervising in
spectors have reduced the carrying ca
pacity of the Georgia from 80 to 36.
COMMERCIAL CLUB
BANQUET JAN. 12.
Emery Valentine, who is on the
Commercial Club banquet committee,
reports that good progress is being
made with the matter in hand.
The lists are now being compiled
and invitations will soon be out. Tom
Radonich. of the Alaska Grill, who
is charged with the duty of prepar
ing the feast, is busy arranging the
card and decorations.
It is expected that this gathering
which is to be held on Jan. 12, will
result in bringing the business men
of Juneau into a closer union and that
a more united effort will prevail on
all matters pertaining to civic better
ment.
Harold M. Brown, who has been
connected with the local steamboat
inspector's office, has resigned and
will return to his former home in
Pennsylvania.
TAfTS
MESSAGE
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.?President
Taft's message was submitted to Con
gress today. It warns foreign na
tions against discriminating adverse
ly to American trade, and appeals to
Congress to open markets for Ameri
can industries.
FEDERAL WAR
ON RACE SUICIDE
On November 20 ut a given Bigual,
United States marshals in about 70
cities throughout the country, swept
down on the unsuspecting malpracti
tioners of those places bearing war
rants for the arrest of those charged
with criminal practices.
For more than seven mouths 300
inspectors of the post oilice depart
ment have been working on a nation
wide investigation.
Under the direction of the attor
ney-general at Washington, the drag
net was spread over the country
reaching from Pittsburg to Seattle in
an attempt to serve 173 indictments
against physicians, druggists and mid
wives in a national effort to stop the
use of the mails for the furtherance
of criminal medical practice.
In California twenty-seven indict
ments, 18 of which were issued by
the grand jury sitting in San Fran
cisco, were put in the hands of the
federal officers. Oakland is credited
with holding eight of the 27 against
whom indictments had been found.
Other California cities harboring this
class of criminals are Los Angeles
Petaluma, San Jose, Sacramento,
Fresno and Glendale.
Seattle stood directly in the path
of the descending wrath and many
persons charged with the vicious prac
tice were gathered in.
Portland, Oregon, did not escape
and several arrest9 were made there
on the indictments issued.
In Spokane the dtagnet caught
about the same number as those
found in Portland.
In every instance the charge is mis
use of the mails to solicit criminal
medical practice or to dispose of med
icine or instruments connected with
such practice.
The matter of collecting the mass
of evidence necessary to get con
viction rested with the small army of
post office inspectors. In many cases
the inspectors paid personal vinits to
men and women supected of being en
gaged in the nefarious calling. In
other instances the inspectors com
municated with suspected individuals
using decoy letters and under ficti
tious names asked for the methods
employed and the prices charged. Fi
nancial consideration were found to
range from $5 up to $S00. In most
cases those arrested gave bail for
their appearance.
The evening of the day of the
great raid Postmaster-General Hitch
cock issued the following statement:
"The work of the postoillce inspect
ors today is the culmination of the
crusade instituted more than two
years ago against the fraudulent and
unlawful use of the mails. In that
comparatively brief time we have
wiped out of existence concerns that
have mulcted the people of this coun
try out of more than $100,000,000 by
frauds perpetrated through the use of
the mails, and the courts have sent
many of the promoters of the fraudu
lent schemes to the penitentiary,
where they now are serving time.
"The wide publicity given to the
arrests made today will do more to
put an end to this particular sort of
criminality than any number of prac
tically unknown prosecutions of wide
ly separated cases."
TO RELIEVE THE
DEMAND FOR MONEY.
WASHINGTON. Dec. 3.?Represen
tative Levy, of New York, introduced
a resolution in the House today di
recting the Sercretary of Treasury
to place fifty millions in the national
banks to relieve the "sharp, active
demand for money."
District Attorney and Mrs. Rust
gard entertained Mr. and Mrs. J. F.
A. Strong at dinner on Sunday eve
ning at their home on Gastineau
Heights.
JOSLIN m
WE iSTER FREE
VALDEZ, D c. 3;?A special term of
court for thi^ division was opened
yesterday by Uulge Thomas R. Lyons,
of Juneau. The n\ost important cases
to be tried a <? those known as the
"Fairbanks bank cases," in which
Capt. E. T. I rnctte and others are
Involved.
The Indictm nts against Falcon Jos
tin, of Seattle and Fairbanks, and E.
L. Webster, a former Fairbanks man,
but now a resident of Seattle, were
dismissed. Joslln and WebBter were
indicted on charges of publishing
false reports of the financial stand
ing of tho Washington-Alaska bank, of
Fairbanks which failed in 1911 for a
large sum.
The work 01 Impanelling a Jury in
the case against Barnette was begun
in the afternoon.
PENSIONS FOR
THE WIDOWS
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.?The first
bill introduced in Congress at this
session was presented by Represen
tative Henry S. Dc Forest, of Sche
nectady, N. Y. It has for Its object
the providing of a pension of one
thousand dollars a month for the
widows of ex-presldents of the United
States.
Banker Snead
Is Acquitted
FORT WORTH, Tex., Dec?"3 ? John
B. Snead was acquitted by the Jury
which tried him for the murder of Al.
O. Boyce, Sr., father of young Boyce,
who eloped with Snead's wife and
whom also Snead attempted' to mur
der. Young Boyce and Mrs. Snead
eloped about a year ago and Snead
followed the pair all over the United
States and Canada, finally locating
them in Manitoba.
FORT WORTH, Texas, Dec. 3. ?
A sensational demonstration fol
lowed the verdict of the Jury in the
Snead trial, his lawyers throwing
thelrhats over the chandelier in the
court room, for which act they were
fined. Snead emitted a cowboy yell
for which he was not reproved.
Budget Plan
in Congress
WASHINGTON. Dec. 3. ? For the
first time in the history of the Con
gress a budget was submitted by Sec
retary of the Treasury McVeagh when
Congress convened yesterday. The
budget contained an estimate of the
receipts and expenditures for the fis
cal year.
The budget is a favored innovation
of President Taft, and is patterned
after the English system which has
been found satisfactory for a cen
tury or more. Opposition to the bud
get plan has been expressed, but it
will be adopted hereafter, in all prob
ability.
Syrian Mother a
Titanic Survivor
CLEVELAND. O., Dec. 3. ? Mrs.
Adele Nazallah, a humble Syrian
widowed survivor of the Bteamship
Titanic disaster, of April 14, last,
gave birth to a girl baby in this city
yesterday. She received a congratu
latory telegram from Mrs. John Jac
ob Astor, also a widowed survivor of
the Titanic.
A RECOUNT OF
THE SUFFRAGE VOTE.
DETROIT, Mish., Dec. 3. ? A re
count of the vote on the amendment
to the State constitution giving wom
en the right to vote has been ordered to
be made In Wayne County, where it
Is charged by the suffragists gross ir
regularities were permitted, includ
ing ballot-box stuffing.
GREECE
OBJECTS
SOFIA, Dec. 3.?It is said an ar
mistice will be signed today, with or
without Greece joining In the final
negotiations, which will take place
at London.
DYNAMITE DEFENSE
CALL WITNESSES
INDIANAPOLIS, Dec. 3.? The case
for the government in the dynamite
conspiracy cases was closed yester
day afternoon, and the first witness
called for the defense was Frank M.
Ryan, president of the International
Structural Ironworkers.
Ryan denied having any knowledge
of the transportation of dynamite, a3
charged by the government, and he
declared that he had never assisted
in the dynamite outrages.
GOVERNORS MEET
IN CONFERENCE
RICHMOND, Va., Dec. 3?The con
ference of governors met in this city
this morning, the feature of the first
meeting being an address of welcome
by Governor Mann, of Virginia. Re
sponses were made by Governor Sha
froth, of Colorado, and others. Forty
states will be represented by their ex
ecutives, but there were only thirty
present today.
IMPEDIMENT Or
JUDGE ARCHIBOLD
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.?Impeach
ment proceedings against Judge Rob
ert W. Archbold, of the Court of Com
merce of the United Sates were be
gun this morning in the Senate. Judge
Archbold is charged with misfeasance
In office, one of the charges being
that he negotiated with coal compan
ies for the purchase of culm hanks
at a low price and using hfx Judicial
position to help himself in a financial
way. He is also charged with dispens
ing justice solely in the interests of
corporations from whom he received
favors.
GEORGIA'S INCOMING LIST.
The Georgia arrived from Sitka and
way points this morning bringing the
following passengers for Juneau. J.
W. .Myers. Jas. Dunsy, Gust Olson,
and O. N. Lehner, from Sitka; Henry
Larson, C. H. Nelson, Ben Marr, Tom
Hall, Eric Ohman and Mc. Whillick,
from Peril straits; H. Van Erman,
John Davis and D. McCloud, from
Tenakee.
CHINESE TROOPS TAKE
MONGOLIAN TOWN.
ST. PETERSBURG, Dec. 5.?A dis
patch to the Novo Vremga states that
the Chinese troops have . occupied
Robdo, Mongolia.
PRESIDENT OF SAN DOMINGO.
SAN DOMINGO, Dec. 3.?The Dom
inican Congress has chosen Archbish
op Noel provisional president of the
republic for the term of two years.
ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE
A DOUBTFUL QUANTITY.
CHICAGO, Dec. 3.?When the
State legislature meets next month
at Springfield two United States sen
ators are to be elected. Among the
candidates are James Hamilton Lew
is, formerly of Seattle, Wash. Lewis
who is a Democrat, was endorsed at
the Fall primaries of that party. T*he
legislature is doubtful, being com
posed of Democrats, Republicans and
a large contingent of Progressives.
Judge J. H. Cobb Is expected home
Saturday evening on the Humboldt.
Mrs. Walter E. Clark and Miss
Green will entertain informally at
cards tomorrow afternoon at the Gov-.
ornor'8 residence. Miss Green is
spending the winter with Mrs. Cark.
Mrs. Femmer has almost cntlroly
recovered from her recent Illness.
BREEZY "UNCLE JOE" CANNON
ALSO SMILING AND SERENE
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.?Breezy
and debonnalr as ever "Uncle Joe"
Cannon, of Illinois, was in his place
in the House yesterday. He takes
iiiu defeat for re-election to Congress
philosophically, and he jokingly said
that though he would be absent in
the next Congress he would not be
forgotten.
Another long time-member of Con
gress who will be missed when taps
are sounded for the present Congress
is John Dalzell, of Pittsburg, who was
Speaker Cannon's stalwart aide on
the committee on rules when the gen
tlemen from Illinois wielded the gav
el in the House. Dalzell failed of
nomination in the primaries of his
district last summer.
A. Mitchell Palmer, of the Twenty
sixth Congressional District, Is likely
to occupy a prominent place in the
councils of the Democratic adminis-1
tration in the House perhaps, or may
be as a member of President Wilson's;
cabinet. Palmer's democracy is of'
the pronounced type; he is a strong
tariff reformer although representing
a Pennsylvania district In Congress.
He was an ardent Wilson supporter
in the Baltimore convention, where
he was one of the most active of the
floor leaders for the New Jersey can
didate.
James R. Mann, the Republican
leader popularly known as "Jim,"
in and out of the House, is as' con
spicuous and pulchrltudinou8 as ever.
Though he was re-elected by his dis
trict last month he will not have the
support from his home state, in the
Slxy-third Congress, that he has had
heretofore. Many of the Republican
contingent in Congress from Illinois
have been replaced by Democrats.
The Democratic representatives in
the next Congress from Northern
states will be substantially increased,
and the so-called influence of South
ern Democrats in the House is likely
to be less marked than in the Sixty
second Congress.
GOV. WILSON VISITS BERMUDA PARLIAMENT
HAMILTON, Bermuda, Dec. 3. ?
President-elect Wilson yesterday at
tended a session of the Bermuda par
liament and listened with close at-j
tention to a tariff discussion. Reply-1
| ing to an address of welcome dellv
I ercd by the speaker of the house. Gov
ernor Wilson said he admired the
business-like manner in which the
parliament conducted Its work.
ALASKANS PLEASED, SAYS DELEGATE
TACOMA, Dec. 3.?Delegate James
\Vicker8ham of Fairbanks, Alaska, In
an interview here, on his way to
Washington, said that President Wil
aonts administration, would favor a
railroad from some point on the coast
to the Interior, and also the devolop
nient of the coal fields oi the terri
tory. For these reasons, the delegate
said, the people of Alaska are pleased
with the election of Governor Wilson.
CRAZED HUSBAND'S
HORRIBLE DEED
SEATTLE, Dec. 3.?Deserted by his
wife, C. A. Johnson, a mechanic, hold
ing their child in his arms, threw
himself in front of a Northern Pacific
train. The child's head was severed
from the body and Johnson is be
lieved to be fatally injured. He was
taken to the Emergency hospital.
HEARING IN
JOHNSON CASE
WASHINGTON. Dec. 3. ? The
United States Supreme Court has ad
vanced the hearing of the case against
Jack Johnson, in connection wltb the
white slave traffic, to Jan. 6.
CHICAGO, Dec. 3.?Jack Johnson
declared last night that he would
marry Lucile Cameron before the
end of the week.
MONUMENT UNVEILED.
DA ETON, Ga., Dec. 3.?The Daugh
ters of. the Confederacy unveiled a
monument here today to the memory
of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston.
To Renew Probing of
Campaign Donations
WASHINGTON, Dec. 13.?The in
quiry being made by the Congression
al committee into campaign expend
itures, which was adjourned shortly
before election day, will be resumed
on Dec. 10.
William Randolph Hearst will be
probably the first witness. He will
bo examined particularly in regard
to his knowledge of campaign contri
butions of the Standard Oil Com
pany.
Hot chili beans all the time at
Lockie McKinnon's Mayflower. tf.
SOMETHING new every day at the
WINTER & POND STORE. ???
SO POPULAR and fashionable are
bracelets that many ladies are wear
ing them on both wrists. You will
find a nice assortment at I. J. SHAR
ICK'S.
J. H. Cobb and family will move|
into their rtew home in the Golden
Belt Addition next week.
POPE APPOINTS
NEW BISHOP
ROME, Dec. 3.?Pope Pius, X., yest
erday announced the following ap
pointments of bishops of the Church
in the United States. Tight Rever
end Dennis J. O'Connell, Bishop of
Richmond; Patrick A. McGovern,
Bishop of Cheyenne; Austin Dowling,
Bishop of Des Moines; Rev. Edward
J. Hanna, Bishop of San Francisco.
JUSTICE MORROW
RESIGNS IN JULY
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 3?Justice
William W. Morrow, of the Circuit
Court of Appeals for the ninth cir
cuit, has announced that he will re
tire 011 attaining his seventieth birth
day next July. Justice Morrow was
appointed to his present position by
President McKinley in 1897.
DIRECT ELECTION OF
THE PRESIDENT.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3?Senator
John D. Works, of California, intro
duced a Senate joint resolution to
day providing for an amendment to
the federal constitution whereby the
president may be elected by a di
rect vote of the people.
PRESIDENTIAL AND
OTHER PENSIONS.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.?Senator
McCmnber, of North Dakota, intro
duced a bill in the Senate today which
provides for the pensioning of form
er presidents, commanders-in-chief of
the army and their widows. The
former are to receive each $10,000 a
year, and the latter $5,000.
NOTICE.
In order to Insure the publication
of advertisements In The Dally Em
pire, copy should reach the office not
later than 9 a. m.
NeweFt styles in IVORY JEWELRY
Just In at W. H-. CASE. tf.
Billy Myers who presides over the
destinies of the Germania during the
absence of the McCloskey brothers,
had a letter this week from Jim Mc
Closkey stating that he and the fam
ily were leaving for the East.
M. V. Christman, of Treadwell, was
a visitor In Juneau today.

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