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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 06, 1912, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE;:
J. F. A. STRONG. 1
TELEPHONE 3-74 <
I
Application has been made to the
postottlce department for the entry of
this newspaper as second class mat- |
ter. !
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One Year, by mall . $10.00
Six Months, by mall 5.00
Per Month, delivered 1.00 |
_ <
ALASKA A HEALTHY COUNTRY.
A news item published in the Daily
Kiupire yesterday stated that the
death roll of Nome since 1900 was
approximately 55S people. It was al
io alleged that many of the deaths
were uot due to natural causes but
..ere the result of accidents. The
statement as applied to the early
days of Nome is true. In the fall o'
l.V'j and 1900 and 1901 the deaths by
drowning all along the coast of Ber
ing sea from Cape Prince of Wales .
to Cape Nome were appalling. It is
safe to say that forty mer. lost their
lives in the surf which lashes the
shore with every wind that blows.
The establishment of a life saving
station in 1903 at Nome had much to
do with the marked decrease of
drowning by accidents. A life saving
crew is maintained by the government
and its work has fully justified the
maintenance of the station at that
place. Another contributing cause is
the fact that men have learned their
lesson in the angry sea. and do not
take the chances that they, once did.
But still at more remote points of the
coast death by drowning annually
claims its tale of human lives.
Speaking by and large the cli
mate of Alaska promotes longevity,
whether on the southern coast where
there is much humidity, or on Bering
sea and In the Interior where the
summers are bright and pleasant, and
where in winter the days are clear,
but at times the thermometer reaches
a low point. But in all the different
sections the air is pure and hence
the general health of the people is
always good.
That Alaska isa healthy country
in which to reside Is borne out by the
successive reports of the surgeon-gen
eral of the United States army who
testifies that the general health of
the soldiers stationed at the various
Alaska army posts is better than in
any portion of the continent where
artny posts are maintained.
Looks as if Turkey would be all
picked to pieces.
An eastern newspaper rises to re
mark that the Philippine islands are
not inhabited by a homogeneous peo
ple. Judging by the ease and facility
with which one tribe bolos another,
and between times machete Ameri
can soldiers, we should say not?de
cidedly not. They are heterogeneous.
Men who spend their lives on the
problem of perpetual motion, squar
ing the circle or drawing tariff bills
are alone cognizant of the difficulties
which beset a woman facing her
Christmas list, says an erudite ev
change. Well, that is putting a fine
point on It.
A HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE.
The Empire believes that the time
has arrived when Alaska should have
a lunatic asylum of its own. This po
sition is taken because it believes
that the present system of farming
out the insane patients of this ter
ritory to the lowest bidder is Inhu
mane and little short of indecent.
The alleged sanitariums which
make a specialty of caring for insane
people by submitting bids for their
care and maintenance cannot be ex
pected to give the attention and treat
ment which a diseased mind requires.
Competitive bids for the care of in
sane people! Think of it! The price
per patient is pared down to the clos
est possible point. The government
saves a few dollars a year, and the
patients get the scantiest fare, the
scantiest attention, the cheapest treat
ment. What else could be expected
under such an archaic, inhuman sys
tem? Dollars staked against the
helpless Insane Save the dollars; and
let the helpless fall where they may.
This is the logical working out of such
a system. Primarily the keepers of
these sanitariums are not to blame;
they are compelled to "tender" for
the keeping and clothing and treat
ment of the insane, and if the keeper
tenders too low an amount to afford
the treatment and the care of the suf
ferers require, who is it that suffers?
The government? No. Its pocket
book is eased; the burden of discom
fort falls upon the poor, the helpless
Insane folk.
Not long since The Empire revert
ed to this question. The. statements
then made were based upon first hand
information that came from reliable
men who had visited Momingside
isyluiu. iu Oregon, where the Alaska. |
usuntf are lodged. These statements
ivero, in effect, that the patients
here confined do not receivo proper
aure either as to mental or physical
:rcatment.
It is for these- and other cogent
reasons that The Empire believes that
Vlaska should have its own hispital
for its insane. Better treatment, bet
er care, better conditions would ob
:ain in such a place in Alaska than
elsewhere outside of it. It would be
juder responsible direction, whereas
jndcr the system now followed the
main responsibility rests upon the
men whose lowest bid has been nc
septed.
The Empire proposes when the ter
ritorial legislature meets to urge up
>n it the memoralizing of Congress
.o the end that an appropriation may
jo had for the construction of an in
ane asylum at one of the numerous
liot springs with which this coast
ibounds; and also that an investiga
ion be made of the care that is now
icing afforded patients at the con
ract sanitarium in Oregon.
A story is told nbout a Seattle dog
>vhlch fired a gun and killed a duck.
The Seattle "spirit" was either on the
log or In the man who told the yarn.
We repeat that the high cost of liv
ing is analogous to the cost of high
tivlng?a sort of cousin german, you
know.
NATIONAL CAMPAIGN FUNDS.
The contributions to the national
campaign funds of the three leading
parties have been reported, and we
find that about five millions of dol
lars in round numbers, were spont for
campaign purposes in the late elec
'lon. Of this amount two millions
.ire credited to the Republican party
n its effort to re-elect President Taft.
and about a million and a half each
were spent by the Democrats and
Progressives.
It costs a deal of money to elect a
President of the United States, but
the sums spent are rather modest
when compared with the campaign
funds of former presidential years.
This condition is due, no doubt, to
the law which compels candidates
and political parties to publish exact
statements showing their expendi
tures. It is a wholesome law in ef
fect and the "slush funds" of former
/ears are no longer known.
An interesting phase of the contri
butions is their sources. President
Taft, representing the Republican
party, received a large portion of his
campaign fund from his relatives.
Colonel Roosevelt's heaviest contribu
tors were George \V. Perkins and
Crank A. Munsey. of New York, who
seem to have given most generously.
Governor Wilson's campaign fund
came from a much larger number of
people, and individual contributions
were not very heavy as compared
with those made to the other parties.
It is also interesting to know that
a large portion of all the campaign
funds was used for advertising and
publicity purposes.
We are making progress towards
attaining purity in elections. The
ballot box is now pretty clean, and
bribery and corruption have been
practically eliminated. A higher
standard of political morality has
been established. It is not so many
years since, in Indiana, votes were
purchased in "blocks of five." Yes,
we are making progress all the time
toward clean ballot boxes and clean
politics.
A new society has been organized.
We are great on forming new socie
ties in America. This one is called
the Society for the Prevention of Use
less Giving?Spug. for short.
Anyway they seem to be having a
sort of mixed time in Europe these
days.
THE INFLUX OF VISITORS.
A condition, not a theory confronts
Tuneau. as atown. According to Unit
States .Marshal Faulkner the popula
tion next week will* be increased at
least by one hundred and seventy
five persons, all adults, we assume.
These are witnesses. Jurors and oth
ers who will come here to attend the
term of court which opens Tuesday
next. And the crux of the matter is
that the marshal does not know where
they shall be housed. They can be
fed, but they cannot sleep in the
woodshed. And this is why Marshal
Faulkner's brow is furrowed with
care. Hotel accommodations cannot
be had for such a number of people
That is too much to be expected. And
the next, and in fact the only recourse
is an appeal to the private homes of
the people. No doubt a considerable
number will be able to secure tem
porary lodgings in this way, but the
time is here when Juneau must be
able to permanently care for a largly
increased population, both permanent
and transient.
It is assumed that the need will be
met. In fact it must be if this town
is to grow in the manner which many
anticipate. Rut it would seem to be 14
a reasonable suggestion to prepurc
for it in advance. ; |
Our neighbor, Douglas, will no doubt ? ?
be able to care for a number of our Im
mediate visitors, but it does not speak
any too well for the cupitnl city of the ??
territory to be compelled to pass them !!
along to other towns. ; j
The Republican "pie" distributors ..
in Ohio have patched up a truce, (lood "
idea. Not much time left to get
through with the work.
Mr, Wilson will have a busy time 4"
when he gets home. And It Is likely ~
to continue for four years thereafter.
Those Mexican rebels are by no ~
mean effete. They still know how to
hold up a train and shake down its
passengers.
Bulgaria got a loan from Russia.
And she will likely get a slice of Tur
key.
Judging by press reports Oenora)
Panic is trying to edge General Pros
perity out of the road.
THE TELEPHONE.
.j.
By, the Poet Philosopher.
It Is indeed a wondrous thing, thir.
modern telephone, that' will ncros.1
the distance bring a speaker's light
est tone. Sometimes I sit nnd con
template its weird, surprising plnn,
and bless the scientist so great who
gave this boon to man. And then
again I rant and bawl about its
many faults, and tear the blamed
thing from the wall, and on the pieces
waltz. Your mirthful lips are strick
en dumb, sealed are the founts of
song, when central (busy chewing
gum) gets all the numbers wrong.
I sometimes wonder what we'd do "
if we should lose our phones. We'd
be a hopeless, helpless crew! We'd
till the world with groans. To get *
back to our fathers' ways would fill ?
our souls with aches! A message
then would take three days, that now
u minute takes! And then again u
seems to me that life would be more
gay if all the telephones that be were
burned or shipped away. For when in
haste I'd use the phone to gossip
with my frau, I hear stern central's
monotone: "The line is busy now?"
It is a nuisance and a boon, a bless
ing and a curse; perhaps they will
improve it soon, perjhaps they'll make
it worse. WALT MASON.
YOU GET NEW IDEAS ]
aB you look through my holiday stock.
It is a practical demonstration of pos
sibilities in gathering under one roof
nearly everything to make people
happy at Christmas time.
E. Valentine's Jewelry Store, Juneau. |
A TOBACCO INQUIRY.
WASHINGTON. Dec. 5.?The Con
gressional Tabacco Commission has
begun an inquiry into tobacco condi
tions in foreign countries.
TO FIGHT CHOLERA.
WASHINGTON. Dec. 5?Maj. C.
S. Ford, of the army medical corps,
has been assigned to cholera work
at Constantinople.
Valentine's Store presents the sea
son's opportunity for pleasure and
economy in buying: delight and sat
isfaction In receiving. It insures u
Merry Christmas. :
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION.
Case No. 940-A.
In the District Court for the District
of Alaska, Division No. 1, at
Juneau.
First National Bank of Juneau, Plain
tiff, vs.
Ellen G. Bach, Frank Bach, North
west Rubber Company, Schwabach
er Bros. & Co., Inc., defendants.
To the NORTHWEST RUBBER
COMPANY and SCHWABACHER
BROS. & CO., Inc., defendants,
GREETING:
In the name of the United States of
America and pursuant to an order of
the above entitled Court in the above
entitled cause made on the 5th day
of November, 1912, you and each of
you are hereby commanded to be and
appear in the above entitled court
holden at Juneau, in said Division, in
said Territory, and answer th<j com
plaint filed against you in the above
entitled action within thirty days
from the date of the last publication
hereof; and if you fail so to appear
and answer for want' thereof the
plaintiff will apply to the Court for
and the Court will grant the relief
demanded in said complaint, to-wit:
Judgment on a promissory note
against Frank Bach, in the sum of
one thousand dollars ($1,000.00),
with interest thereon at the rate of
twelve per cent (12 per cent) per
annum, from the 24th day of May,
1909; one hundred dollars ($100.00)
attorney's fees; together with its
costs and disbursements herein in
curred; further for a decree foreclos
ing a certain mortgage upon certain
property situate in Douglas, Alaska,
against all the defendants herein.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have
hereunto set my hand and affixed the
seal of the above entitled court this
5th day of November, 1912. 1
E. W. PETTIT, Clerk. <
First publication, November 5, 1912. 4
Last publication December 17, 1912. ^
h I CHARlCK
| S . | JEWELER
, B O + ? #nd OPTICIAN i
f
o . . . . .
The Empire
for
fob Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
R. P. NELSON
Wholesale and Retail Dealer \
In All Kinds
STATIONERY j
Typewriting Supplies, Blank
Books, Office Supplies, Sporting *
<GoodE, Huyler's Candles, Gun
ther's Candies, Toys, Notions,
Books, Magazines, Waterman's j
Fountain Pens, Conklln Pens,
Etc. ;
Cor. 2nd* and Seward Sts.
Juneau, Alaska
| The Unique Millinery |
I LADIES* I
FURNISHINGS I
I I I 'M 1
-
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Kllllsnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 6, 11. 17, 23. 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29. Jan. 4, 10,
16. 22. 28. Fob. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
LeaveB Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4. 28, Feb. 21, '
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyce, 8:00 |
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21. March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station. Jualln, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9. 15. 21. 27. Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20.
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19. 25, March
3. 9, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
Weeks
'Two-Tine/
Designed to mod the de
mand for Excavator of
small first cost, to co/te
with conditions for which '
the Steam Shovel is not sailed
and yet approach its cost of ope r- 1
at ion.
IT8 USES: Dredging under w>.
tor; placer mining; loading l-.llas:
from bank to cart; putting coal from
atockpilo to bunker: grading for rail- >
road; excavating trenchca, canali,
foundational unloading 010 and gravel
from acowa; excavating river bcdi
for plera; and many otheri.
Manufactured in four tixei; from
\ to 2 cubic yarda capacity.
Only drag-line ahovel that work*
under water.
For more detaila oall on or write
Seattle Construction & Dry Dock Co.
Dept. K Seattle. U. S. A. 8
?????????MBlMiiaL rvxraS
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Abulia Flyer S. HUMBOLDT I The Alaska Flyer I
NORTHBOUND DEC. 8
SOUTHBOUND DEC. 9
/
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Sonttlo Ofllco, 710 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, ArciU
-1-H-H I I I I I I I 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 I t-H 1 1 1 III I 1 1 1 M 111 1 1' 1 1 1 Ml II lit
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
? STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- -
! BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY II
: STEAMSHIP DOLPHIN
? NORTH NOV. 28, DEC. 9, 21
I SOUTH NOV. 29, DEC. 10, 22 II
I Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through
| tickets to San Francisco. I!
I ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. II
i-i-i-i-H-H"!"!"!"!"!"!11 ?!? i I I! I ! 1 I I M-H I ?! I 1 I ii 1 1 1 1 I i III II III l-'.-b
I NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 7
First Clasc Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSEN 1 CO., Douglas
ftJ JW.JU LIU ??
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastScrvice
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson. Prince Rupert, Swanaon, Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria nnd Seattle
PRINCESS MAY DEC. 19
Front and Seward St?. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE T. SPICKETT, Agt.
-rH-FI I I I I I I I I I I i I I I I I I I I I I I I CI I I I I I I I I I I I I H I I I I I I I I I
:! ALASKA COAST CO. i:
< ? For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
I! Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
!! S. S. YUKON NOVEMBER 24 H
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA
)) connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports J'
;; S. S. YUKON DECEMBER 4 <?
Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? ?
| | For further information apply to j |
;; S. H. Ewlng, Juneau Agent ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ;;
I I I II I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
I tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
DougUu and
Treadwcll
?8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. ra.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread
well for j
Juneau
?8:25 a. m. I'
9:25 a. m. I
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. ra.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. ra.
Leaves
Douglas for j
Juneau
?8:30 a. m. |
9:30 a. m. !
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaven Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a* m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
I . Sheep Creek
| Saturday Night Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule same oh abovc^?xcept^ripj?mvingjjuncail^at^amn^^>mUtgd^^^^^^^
?M 1 I 1 'I ?! ?!' I I I l"!"!"!"!11 1 I I I i I I i I I 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I 1 !? I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I 1
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX f
Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan j'
;; COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
*! FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA "
I ! I 1 M 1 I 1 1 1 111 1 I I11 ! I I 1111 i 111 I 1 1 I 1 IT 111 111 1 111 I 111 II 11
M,MI;
We Are Headquarters for j
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
j ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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