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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 07, 1912, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG.
TELEPHONE 3-74
Application has been made to the
postoflice department for the entry of
this newspaper as second class mat-1*
ter.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One Year, by mall .! $10.00
Six Months, by mail 5.00
Per Month, delivered 1.00
A UNANIMOUS OPINION.
They all tell the same story?do
those men who come to Junean from
other points, south or west. This
section of Alaska is attracting the
attention of many people, mining men
and others.
Those who drop in here from the
westward say that Juneau is by far
th.~ most lively town on the coast
but they also predict a great futun
for their respective sections. Anii
they are right. The Alaska of ter.
years hence will show marvelous de
velopment.--every section of It that
now Is inhabited. Its population
will have doubled or trebled, perhaps
quadrupled within the next decade,
if we are to believe the stories that
are told of the marvelous richness
of districts where the real work of de
velopment has just begun.
Alaska within two or three years
will be supplying the Pacific coast
with a large share of the coal It con
sumes. with the settlement of the
coal question which is bound to
come. Its output of gold from its
quartz mines on the coast and in the
interior will increase by leaps .and
bounds, while the placer gold produc
tion will be active fifty years hence.
Its copper is just beginning to occupy
a prominent place in the nation's out
put. and it has just started. Many
other rich mines will become produc
ers as soon as cheaper and better
transportation facilities are provid
ed. And then we have our fisheries
which will be greatly expanded and
Alaska will reap returns from them
which are now diverted elsewhere.
The outlook for every section of
Alaska never looked more promising
The winter of our discontent is pass
ing and all may take courage.
The Mariposa, of the Alaska
Steamship Company is entitled to
carry the broom Sixty hours be
tween Seattle and Juneau is going
some.
THE DAYS OF "HOOCH.'
The manufacture of "hoochino" by
the natives of Alaska, we understand,
is now practically unknown, although
afew years ago it flourished amar
inglv in the more remote regions. In
the Daily Kmpire of yesterday there
was detailed a story of the manufac
ture and sale of "hooch" by the Cape
Prince of Wales Eskimo. Some years
ago on the Bering Sea coast the dis
tilling of rum from molasses, dried
apples, corn meal and the like was
a winter industry, and though the
native larder might be skimped the
hootch bottle was kept well filled.'
Of late years the government how
ever. has conducted a vigorous cam
paign against the manufacture of
this bad booze and its efforts to
stamp out the business have been
fairly successful. The greatest men
ance now is the illicit peddler of
whiskey among the natives. They,
unfortunately, can always find some
degenerate white man who will cater
to their desire for red liquor, and they
can buy It more cheaply than they
can manufacture it themselves.
Officers of the law have always
been handicapped in securing evi
dence and insuring conviction of
these offenders. Juries question the
credibility of native witnesses and
complainants, and the white vendor
escapes often when he should be pun
ished. No sane person can question
the desirability of protecting the na
tive people from the harpy peddler
of hootch, for it is a fact that nearly
all the crime and debauchery among
the natives are directly traceable to
this source.
PEOPLING THE PACIFIC COAST.
Atlantic steamship companies are
making preparations for handling a
large immigration to the Pacific
coast with the opening of the Pan
ama canal. This Immigration will
come largely from Southern Europe.
The time was when the bulk of the
immigration to the United States
came from the north of Europe. Now
It is different and the southern Eur
opean states furnish most of the Im
migrants.
And this fact is causing consider
able discussion In the newspapers of
the Pacific coast, who fear that the
influx from Europe will congest in
the cities instead of being distributed
in the agricultural regions. There
is cause for the apprehension, for, by
far the larger proportion of the im
migrants from the south of Europe
seek the cities, where large colonies
of every country can bo found. -This
Is especially true of the cities of the
Atlantic coast, and the cities of the
Pacific coast may have similar ex
periences
The colonizing of cities in this
wuy Is not desirable, either for the
cities or these denizens themselves.
There is umple room for them on
the soil, however, which many of
them know how to cultivate. Oppor
tunities on the farms of the entire
Pacific coast await them, and the de
maud for labor may absorb more.
Hut we do not wonder that Pacific
coast cities do not relish the creation
of distinctive colonies within their
bounds.
It is stated that the Hamburg
American Company will establish a
direct line of steamships from Eur
ope to the Pacific coast; other of the
big Atlantic steamship companies will
also get into the business, and the pop
ulation of the entire coast, from San
Diego to Nome will be increased to
a large extent. And there will be a
great expansion of commercial busi
ness as well
SAGEBRUSH WISDOM.
Governor Tasker L. Oddle, of Ne
vada, is a courageous man. as was
to be expected from a statesman of
the sagebrush state. Nevada has furn
ished a standing text for many peo
ple and newspapers. Paragraphers
and others have shot their attic wit at
the state, because, forsooth, it has af
forded an asylum for those of every
nation whose matrimonial chains were
galling.
Now comes Governor Oddie and
tells the wisdom of the country, as
exemplified by, and through, the gath
ering of governors at Richmond. Va..
that his state has no apologies to
make, or any desire to change, her
divorce laws. Marriage and divorce
declared the Nevada man are funda
mentally sociological questions, and
by inference he says that Nevada
should be permitted to solve these
matters in the light of her experience
and wisdom. Governor Oddie is fun
damentally right also. And though
some will disagree with him, Nevada
will continue to be an asylum for
those that would be free.
New York and Newport; Pat
chogue. Pittsburg and Punxsutawney
?all will rejoice because the road to
Reno remains and the mill ready to
grind.
A BLEASE RAMPANT.
Governor Cole L. Blease of South
Carolina Is troubled with a cacoethes
Ioquendi?an Itch for talking. When
a governor of a great state in a rep
resentative gathering of chief execu
tives dares to say "to hell with the
Constitution." This is the action of
a blatant blackguard and no more
represents the views of the people
of his state or the people of the south
than they represent the opinions of
the sane people of the north.
The question which evoked the
ebullition of the South Carolinian is
an ever present one in most of the
southern states, but the way to han
dle it and control It is not by open
ly advocating lynch law, and damning
the Constitution and the statute
books.
Speaking in a purely elemental
sense there have been Ivnchings that
seemed to be justified by the circum
stances. and there have been others
that have shocked the country, where
insensate mobs, their vision red, have
slain to gratify the mere lust for
blood.
And lynchlngs, too have not al
ways been confined to the region
south of Mason and Dixon's line, but
they have occurred in the north and
nearly always with much less reason
than those of the South.
The reckless use of language by
such men as Governor Blease makes
a deplorable situation worse and
adds another blot to the country's
escutcheon; and not only that but it
tends to breed a disregard of human
life, a contempt for law and obloquy
for themselves.
South Caroline could get along very
well with fewer men of the Blease
brand..
A PECULIAR CASE.
In pardoning Albert T. Patrick,
Governor Dix of New York, 1b ([noted
as saying that it had always seemed
to him that there was something pe
culiar about the case The case was
peculiar in many respects. Patrick
was found guilty of murder and con
demned to death. His death sen
tence was commuted by one governor
and the succeeding governor, after
a review of the record pardoned him
with no tarnish on hiB name, so far as
the law is concerned. Patrick may
or may not be guilty, says a contem
porary in commenting upon the case.
It is a question about which men
will naturally have different opinions.
But whatever the truth may be,
there certainly can be no good rea
son for holding the American cour'.j
or the American method of adminis-'
tering justice responsible for what ?
has happened In Patrick's case. !
The plain fact. In spito of public [
opinion to the contrary, Is that tho ?
government, in efforts to convict !
men who nre accused of crime, Is u'. *
considerable disadvantage. The co ?
efficients of immunity are numeroui: !
Tho immunities begin witli the *
chance of the offender to escap > do- ?
tectlon and arrest, and do not end 1
until the confusing and convonieut *
rule of the law with respect to th ?
"reasonable doubt" has been cxhaus'- .
ed. I
It was this rule that gave Putrict: ^
his freedom. No man or woman of ?
gentle impulse will begrudge Patrick
hiB liberty. They will hope, at least
that he deserves to be free, and will "
regret the exactions the la*v has
made of him. But they will not L?
inclined to sympathize with any reck
less criticism of the American system
of jurispudence on account of the
Patrick case.
ANCIENT ADVICE.
By the Poet Philosopher.
Come, let us do our shopping early
and buy a doll with tresses curly? or
buy two dolls?if they are twi n:. T'u
theme is all that I can think of. the
only subject for a lay; the bubbling
spring that* poots drink of for me is i
dry as last year's hav. I've scrutch
ed my head for hours together to
find a subject for a song, and there
is nothing but the weatner?and thai
I've sung about too long. I've racked
my brain till it is popping, disturbed
the household's restful calm; there's
nothing left but Christmas shopping,
that one in verses may embalm. On
sisters, do your shopping early, before
tho rushing throngs begin, for \ lion
you reach the portals pearly, St. Pet
er will not let you in! There's no
thing doing in this valley, the conn- .
try's quiet as the town; gone ere the
cactus and the rally, the suffragists
have simmered down. The poet's <
briny tears are dropping adown ins I
whiskers to the floor; there's nothing
left but Christmas shopping that
calls for anthems any more. The
knee-sprung muse is sour and surly
the harp is made of rusty tin. Oh.
brothers, do your shopping early, be
fore the Christmas crowds begin!
WALT MASON
LI
The stock of diamond goods, now
on display at Valentine's Store in Ju
neau, iB something that you would
not expect to see in this far North
ern country. He has them In any
quantity, size or price, and in all
styles of mountings. ?**
Fire at Latouche
I The electric power plant at the La- ,
touche mine was burned on Nov. 25.
causing a shut down until repairs
are made.
The ore bins were full however,
hence shipments are not yet inter
rupted. It is expected that the plant
the plant will be rebuilt and in work
ing order within six weeks.
Longshore Boss 0. E. Head had his
crew loading halibut on the North
western last night. The shipment
amounted to 44 boxes, which if hon
est returns were made, at the pres
ent price of nine cents per pound,
amount to a considerable sum.
What could be more appropriate
than a beautiful umbrella for Christ
mas? Valentine has them in count
less styles. ??? ;
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION.
Case No. 940-A.
In the District Court for the District
of Alaska, Division No. 1, at
Juneau.
First National Bank of Juneau, Plain
tiff, vs.
Ellen G. Bach, Frank Bach, North
west Rubber Company, Schwabach
er Bros. & Co., Inc., defendants.
To the NORTHWEST RUBBER
COMPANY and SCHWABACHER
BROS. & CO., Inc., defendants,
GREETING:
In the name of the United States of
America and pursuant to an order of
the above entitled Court in the above
entitled cause made on the 5th day
of November, 1912, you and each of
you are hereby commanded to be and
appear in the above entitled court
holden at Juneau, in said Division, in
said Territory, and answer the com
plaint filed against you in the above
entitled action within thirty days
from the date of tho last publication
hereof: and if you fail so to appear
and answer for want thereof the
.plaintiff will apply to the Court for
and the Court will grant the relief
demanded in said complaint, to-wit:
Judgment on a promissory note
against Frank Bach, in the sum of
one thousand dollars ($1,000.00),
with interest thereon at the rate of
twelve per cent (12 per cent) per
annum, from the 24th day of May,
1909; one hundred dollars ($100.00)
attorney's fees; together with Its
costs and disbursements herein in
curred; further for a decree foreclos
ing a certain mortgage upon certain
property situate in Douglas, Alaska,
against all the defendants herein.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have
hereunto set my hand and affixed the
seal of the above entitled court this
5th day of November, 1912.
E. W. PETTIT, Clerk.
First publication, November 5, 1912.
Last publication December 17, 1912.
I I CHARICK
| Jj k J JEWELER
^ and OPTICIAN
I I I I I I I I Ii II I I I I I I I I 111
The Empire
(or
lob Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know 1
F
Equal <
(
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
R. P. NELSON
Wholesale and Retail Dealer
in All Kinds
STATIONERY
Typewriting Supplies, Blank
Books, Office Supplies, Sporting
Goods, Huyler's Candles, Gun
ther'a Candles, Toys, Notions,
Books, Magazines, Waterman's
Fountain Pens, Conklln Pens,
Etc.
Cor. 2nd. and Seward Sts.
Juneau, Alaska
H~H-H"I"l"l"l"l"l"l"l"l"l"l"l"l"H-4-HH-d
; The Unique Millinery |
LADIES' |
FURNISHINGS J
*i-i 111111 m n m m m m Hi
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonali, Gypsum,
Tcnakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5. 11, 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10.
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9. 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Doc. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21.
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyoe, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23. Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, EI
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, S:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15, 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8. 14, 20,
26. Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19. 25, March
3, <J, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
willis e. nowell, manager
Weeks j
f' ?
OESIGNED to moot the tic?
maud for Excavator of
small first cost, to co/kj
tcithcorulitionsfor which
the Steam Shovel is not suited
and yet approach its cost of oper
ation.
ITS USES: Dredging under we
tcr; placer mining; loading ballaat
from bank to c?rs; putting coal from
atockpUo to bunkor; grading for rail
road; excavating trenches, canals,
foundations; unloading oro and gravel
from scowa; excavating river beds
for piers; and many others.
Manufactured in four sixes; from
% to 2 cubic yards capacity.
Only drag-llne shovel that works
under water.
For more details call on or write
Seattle Construction & Dry Dock Co.
Dept. K Seattle, TJ. 8. A.
iw.'i M,inr^'WMi*nagigai
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The AUika Flyer S? HUMBOLDT The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND DEC. 8
SOUTHBOUND DEC. 9
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle OIHce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
?|1 [?!?.; 1 ! I ; I I I 1 I ; i i 1 | M 1 ! 1 III I I 1 !? I ?! 1 II 1 1"! I I II 1 M I 1 I I I
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
" STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- '?
[I BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY !!
STEAMSHIP DOLPHIN
?? NORTH NOV. 28, DEC. 9, 21 ??
SOUTH NOV. 29, DEC. 10. 22
" Tickets to Seattle. Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through
" tickets to San Francisco. j)
!! ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. !'
?H-I-1 l-I-l 11-1-M-I-I-H~H-H-H-I-I-H"I"I"H"I"1"1|,I"1 MH'vfH1 I'l l ! !-H
I NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 7
Firct Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSEN CO., Douglas
m.'j tiv nvff. Aumm Hwnfflwaaa?HBMM?
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prince Rupert, Swannon, Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY DEC. 19
Front nnd Seward St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT. Agt.
-H-H i II I M 1 I I I III I I I I 3 1 i I I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II
i: ALASKA COAST CO. f
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouehe, Seward, . ?
I! ' Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
!! S. S. YUKON NOVEMBER 24 1!
:: SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA !!
J) connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports j)
;; S. S. YUKON DECEMBER 4 ??
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? ?
For further information apply to , ' '
S. H. Ewlng, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Sesj^
I I I I I lil I 11 I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I > I I I I I I 111 I 11 I 11 I M *T I I 11 >?
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE i
I JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be- I
I tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Dough* and
Trcadwcll
?8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread
well for
Juneau
?8:25 aTm.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. ra.
Leaves
Douglas for j
Juneau
?8730 a. m.
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p.m. 1
Leave* Juneau dally
for Sheep Creek
ll:"00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m. _
Prom Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Night Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
I Sheep Creek
11:40 p. ai.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. in.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m. _
Sunday Sch?dulc wtme aa abovc^oxcepttripjcavingJum^
?i-H-H?1 I 1 1 I MI I 1 I I III I I :? IMI' M 1 M I-1 MI 111 111 III 1 M 111 I M
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX |
)| Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan "
;; commercial men's home ;;
" FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. juneau, alaska J.
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 III M 111 111 I 111 m I 111 111 I 1 111 I |
We Are Headquarters for j
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING !
: I
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS I
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
< I

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