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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 12, 1912, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postotllce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of .March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
G?e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mail 9.00
Per month, delivered 100
JUNEAU. ALASKA. DECEMBER 12. 1912.
AN ORGANIZATION FOR THE COMMON GOOD.
THE growth of the Commercial Club is a matter for congrat
ulation, but the increase of membership will not bring the
best results unless every member devotes some time to the
work of the Club and takes an active interest in its welfare. The
tendency among institutions of this kind is to shift the real
work upon the shoulders of a few willing and earnest men.
while the only interest the majority show is to retain their mem
bership. perhaps, by the payment of their dues.
We all believe that Juneau and this district are entering upon
a new and prosperous era. The indications all point in that di
rection. And this being admitted new duties, additional work,
wider aims and a broad policy will be added to the purposes of
the Club. And these purposes are not selfish. On the contrary
they are comprehensive, and if rightly pursued they will have
far-reaching influences for the promotion of many lines of ac
tivity.
New conditions are being developed and how best to meet
them as they arise will be an important problem for this com
mercial organization to solve. The Club proposes to have a din
ner?banquet, if you please?early in the New Year, the prime
object being to get the business, mining and professional men
together, so that they may become better acquainted and get
their neighbor's point of view on such matters as carry a mu
tuality of interest?and there are many of these. Such getting
together should be productive of much benefit in every way, and
it should foster the spirit of the common good?which these
commercial organization are designed to promote.
Do you know that no person now living will ever again have
the opportunity of writing this date after this day expires:
12-12-12; which, being diagramed means the twelfth day of
the twelfth month of the year 1912.
Those New Jersey blackmailers are starting in early to
"shake down" your Uncle Woodrow. They must have forgotten
that he was well frisked in the late campaign.
THE GREAT FATHER OF ALL TRUSTS.
MANY trusts have been prosecuted and investigated during
the past few years, but if we are to believe the allegations
made the father of them all?the great panjandrum of the
tribe?has been found in the Money Trust. This alleged trust
is now being investigated by a congressional committee, and ac
cording to The Empire's dispatches five wise men of Gotham
control no less than the altitudinous total of four hundred mil
lion dollars?a sum too vast for human comprehension. This
is the statement elicited from a New York banker?we know
not how. Perhaps it was wrung from him by the able lawyer
who is conducting the investigation on behalf of the committee
of Congress.
The statement that a stupenduous money combination ex
ists has been made many times within recent years and has
been as often denied. But according to President Frew, of the
Corn Exchange National Bank of New York, trust agreements
between five New York bankers are not merely figments of the
imagination of the political sensationalist or the meretricious
muckraker, but a cold, startling fact.
With such fiinancial power concentrated in the hands of
a small coterie of men their power for evil is absolutely menac
ing, were they disposed to use it for sinister purposes. They
can not only create and control all other trusts but they could
with a motion of the hand stop the wheels of progress and stifle
the prosperity of the nation. No Kings, potentates, or princes
of the earth in any age ever had such unlimited power or wealth
within their grasp.
J L: 4.;?
ine question arises, 11 sucn a moneyeu comuiuauun uw?
actually exist, and it is proven, what shall be done to it or with
it? For despite all the prosecutions that have been effected, the
trusts seem to still thrive at an amazing rate. That they are
a direct result of modern economic and social conditions we be
lieve. That they have come to stay is also apparent. That they
must be controlled either by competition or some other way
equally effective is not susceptible of successful contradiction.
"What shall we do with our presidents?" will be answered
in Mr. Taft's case should he become a professor of law at Yale.
As for the Colonel, nobody can do anything with him.
Boston reports a steady demand for wools, which shows
that the mills are bearing up pluckily against the ruin to come
from a Democratic revision of Schedule K.
CONSERVATION OF THE SALMON INDUSTRY.
THE conservation of the fisheries of Alaska in which The Em
pire takes a great interest has brought an article on salmon
fishing by Mr. Bion H. Chadwick, which we published yesterday.
Mr. Chadwick writes from experience and observation and his
views, therefore, are entitled to the careful consideration of
every one who is interested in this important industdy and its
preservation. ,
He makes a plea for the fish trap, which he holds is not de
structive of the supply of salmon under properly enforced regu- |
lations. Instead, Mr. Chadwick points to the purse seiner as
a first cause in the depletion of salmon in these waters. He also I
condemns the use of spear and gaff-hooks, and emphasizes the
statement that the practice of obtaining salmon at the spawning i
grounds is most destructive and it should be abated. From the f
tenor of his article it is inferred also that taking salmon by using <
the gill net is much less harmful than either the purse seine or j
the spear. i
Mr. Chadwick also urges the protection of the other species 1
of salmon besides the red variety. All the protection given by 1
the government, he says, is aimed at the red salmon, while other j
streams frequented by other species entirely, receive no pro
tection whatsoever. Other agents of destruction are the Dolly j
Varden trout, and such egg-devouring fish; and Mr. Chadwick
believes that the government should seek out the most effective
means to destroy them. Summing up the theme then, it is gath
ered that the writer would abolish purse seining, limit the use of
the spear and the gaff-hook, prevent fishing on the spawning
ground and extenninate the Dolly Varden trout and other egg
devouring fish; and he expresses the opinion that with these con
ditions obtaining at the "rate in which salmon are being taken
for food and profit it cannot be long before we are without sal
mon and trout?the one having been consumed, and the other,
lacking food, becomes extinct. Perhaps the crux of Mr. Chad
wick's article, which, however, is timely throughout, may be
found in his closing statement:
"The Alaska salmon supply may be maintained in sufficient
quantities and indefinitly if the law were based upon a thor
ough knowledge of the subject and enforced generally and effec
tively."
The "power of the press" has once more been demonstrated.
Yesterday The Empire suggested that Juneau'/? streets should
be better lighted. Today they are.
Seattle is again protesting against the proposed closing of
its assay office. It is a fine receptacle for the eggs which Alas
ka, the Golden Goose, lays.
It has been said that ideas rule the world. This is not
strictly accurate. It is ideals by which the world is governed.
Great Activity
Around Ruby
Passengers from Fairbanks on late
steamers en route to the Outsldo
report great activity in the Ruby sec
tion.
It is said that Ruth Sherbouriie has
bought the remaining Interests of
Karnander, 011 Long creek and that
$40,000 was paid for the property.
Farnander is the discover of Lour
creek and had previously sold hold
ings on that Btream for the sum of
$60,000.
Just as the stage was leaving Fair
banks another stampede had start
ed down in the Ruby district.
The newest excitement was caused
by a reported rich strike 011 American
creek which 1b a tributary of the Sa
latna. Ix>ng creek is also a tribu
tary of this stream but American
creek is some disance. from it.
Reports reaching Fairbanks from
the now strike in the Innoko at
Cripple, are to the effect that Cripple
and Fox creeks are looking good.
There is a difficulty here, however,
over the grub shortage and the camp
will have to be depopulated for the
winter.
FEMMER & RITTER.
See this firm for all kinds of dray
ing and hauling. We guarantee sat
isfaction and reasonable priceB. Coal
delivered promptly. Fommer & Rit
ter's Express. Stand Burford's Cor
ner. Phone 314. Residence phones
402 or 403.
The finest sight in town is my beau
tiful stock of cut glass. Here is
where quality counts. Valentine's
Store at Juneau has the latest, new
est and most beautiful designs, some
thing you never saw before. ???
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION.
Case No. 940-A.
In the District Court for the District <?
of Alaska, Division No. 1, at
Juneau. 0
First National Bank of Juneau, Plain- JI
tiff, V8. i >
Ellen G. Bach, Frank Bach, North- J J
west Rubber Company, Schwabach- <?
er Bros. & Co., Inc., defendants. ?
To the NORTHWEST RUBBER o
COMPANY and SCHWABACHER <?
BROS. & CO., Inc., defendants, * J
GREETING: o
In the name of the United States of ?
America and pursuant to an order of ^
the above entitled Court in the abovo <?
entitled cauBe made on the 5th day < >
of November, 1912, you and each of J *
you are hereby commanded to be and <,
appear in the above entitled court <?
holden at Juneau, in said Division, in J|
said Territory, and answer the com- <,
plaint filed against you in the above < >
entitled action within thirty dayB J J
from the date of the last publication 0
hereof; and if you fail so to appear <>
and answer for want thereof the * J
plaintiff will apply to the Court for 0
and the Court will grant tno relief o
demanded In Baid complaint, to-wit: *'
Judgment on a promissory note \,
against Frank Bach, in the sum of < >
one thousand dollars ($1,000.00), ?
with interest thereon at the rate of
twelve per cent (12 per cent) per o
annum, from the 24th day of May, <?
1909; one hundred dollars ($100.00) J
attorney's fees; together with its <.
costs and disbursements herein in- < >
curred; further for a decree foreclos- ] [
tag a certain mortgage upon certain .?
property situate in Douglas, Alaska, ?
against all the defendants herein. <,
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have <>
hereunto Bet my hand and affixed tho J'
seal of the above entitled court this ,,
5th day of November, 1912. < >
E. W. PETTIT, Clerk.
First publication, November 5, 1912. ?
Last publication December 17, 1912. ++
Mexican Croesus
Loses Millions
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Dec. 10. ?
j Gqn. Luis Terrazas, the Rockefeller
J of Mexico is a visitor in this city, for
j the purpose of perfecting the basis
of a claim that he will make against
the Mexican government for damages
of more than $5,000,000. Gen. Ter
rains' homo is in Chihuahua, and dur
ing nearly the whole period of dis
turbance in the neighboring republic
liis ranches and farms have been in
possession of rebels and bands of out
laws. Cattle have been killed and
driven off by the thousands and much
other property belonging to him has
been destroyed.
The lauded holdings of Gen. Ter
razas in the State of Chihauliau aggre
gate about 15,000,000 acres. When
the revolution wihch brought about
the overthrow of President Diaz was
inaugurated the Terrazas properties
were producing a heavy annual reve
nue. all of which has been lost to
their owner during the Inst two years.
Resides his Banco Mineral In that
city has been looted of several hun
dred thousand dollars, and reimburse
ment of this loss will be asked of the
government.
More than one-third of the resi
dences and business houses in the
city of Chihuahua are owned by Ter
razas.
The newest and best, the original
idea and the modern thought in
Christmas goods is seen everywhere
In Valentine's bright, fresh stock of
jewelry, silverware, cut glass, and
every other thing that you may de
sire for presentation. ???
WANTED?on Or before Jan. 1,
small unfurnished house or flat. Give
all particulars and price. A. C. care
box H.
*
MEXICAN EPICURE8 SAY
CACTI IS FINE EATING.
ORANGE, Calif.?Spineless cactus
as a producer of table fruit is rather
a new phase of tho cactus question,
but as a matter of fact the apple of
the spineless cactus is being used
us a table delicacy.
On the Whittlesey ranch, three
miles west of Orange, there is a patch
of spineless cactus several acres In
extent which is a present heavily;
loaded with largo ripe fruit. To thl3 |
patch Mexicans come and buy hun- j
dreds of pounds of the apples, for
the Mexican has learned that the!
fruit is edible. Some of the fruit is
marketed at 10 cents a dozen.
The cactus apple grown on the
spineless cactus Is itself almost free
from spineB. It is the Bize and shape
of a good sized pear, and when a rath
er thick peel is removed a pleasantly
flavored center is revealed. It is said
that a taste of the frulte may be cul
tivated until one becomes fond of it.
If quantity and quality are what you
want: you should Bee Valentine's cut
glass before making your purchases.
Many now and beautiful designs are
displayed, not heretofore seen in
Alaska.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16. 22, 28. Feb. 3. 9, 15, 21. 27,
March 5. 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9. 15, 21. 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14. 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19. 25, March
3, 9, 15. 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
J| J CHARICK
J.J. J?",,
I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I 1 I I
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewi* Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTO R N E YS-AT-L A W
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. 8. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
Tho Alaska Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT I The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND DEC. 8
SOUTHBOUND DEC. 9
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
t-H-H-H- i 1 I I H III 1 MM 11 M 11 1 III I III 1 111 III- 111 111 1 1 1 1 I
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
?? STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN. WRANGEL, PETERS- ??
i: BURG, DOUGLAS. JUNNEAU. HAINES AND SKAGWAY "
STEAMSHIP DOLPHIN
-? NORTH NOV. 28, DEC. 9, 21
SOUTH NOV. 29, DEC. 10, 22 X
." Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through
tickets to San Francisco. '*
? ? \
!! ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. "
-P-H-i-l-M 1 III I III I 111 1 1 I I H 'I III Ml I II 111 II 1 1 III II III III
NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 7
First Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSEN 1 CO., Douglas
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Salting from Junonu tor Port Slmpnon. Prince Rupert Swanaon, Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY DEC. 19
Front and Seward Sta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT, Agt.
-t it I M I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
il ALASKA COAST CO. i;
? ? For YaKutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
!! Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU
II S. S. YUKON NOVEMBER 24
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA !!
\1 connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports J |
?' S. S. YUKON .... DECEMBER 4 -
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? >
For further information apply to
;; S. H. Ewlng, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle
IMI I I I I I I I I I | I | | II | | | | | | | I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I II I I I I I I I I I
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Douglnit and
Troadwell
?8:00 a. ir..
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread
well for
Juneau
*8:25 a. m.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. ra.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. rn.
Leave*
Douglas for
Juneau
?8:30 a. m.
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p.m. 1
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Lea vol Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. ra.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Night Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule same as above, except trip leaving Juneau at 8 a. m. is omitted |
I ! 1 1 I I I I i I I 1 I I I I H 'M 1 M I I 1 I 1 i 1 I 1 I 1 I I I I 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 !?
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX J
Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan *j
;; COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
I! FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA -
-l-M-H-i II II ! I 1 I 1 I I I I I 1 II 1 111 1 111 I 1 111 III III III 1 III III 1
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for jj
i >
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
a / '
t o
: i >
BOOTS , AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS |
<.
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
l o
ALASKA - TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
' ' ' ?
I, o
I i M ' < ' O
* C'IM ?? ' '

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