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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 14, 1912, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912 at tbe postofllco at Ju
neau, Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
0?e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mall 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU. ALASKA. DECEMBER 14, 1912.
THE GROWTH OF JUNEAU ILLUSTRATED.
THE growth of Juneau?the direct cause of which is the ex
tensive mining developments of the past few months?is in
dicated by a number of facts that are distinctly observable:
There has been a marked increase of business of all kinds, accord
ing to the statements of men engaged in business occupations.
The increase of population has caused a scarcity of dwell
ing houses for rent, and enterprising citizens are now planning
to relieve the demand by the building of numbers of cottages
and houses for rental purposes.
The number of children in the public schools has increased
so rapidly that the school building is overcrowded and the
school board is casting around for suitable accommodation to
take care of the overflow. This is one of the healthiest signs of
progressive prosperity. The people who are coming here to
make their homes are bringing their families and the children
are forthwith added to the school roll.
It will, therefore, become necessary for the educational wel
fare of the children of school age for the school board to see to
it that permanent provision be made for their care. The educa
tion of its children is one of the first duties of the state, and
it is a matter of much satisfaction to know that the children of
Alaska are generally provided with schools of an excellent char
acter, as is evidenced by the standing that those of them attain
who graduate from Alaska schools to enter other schools and
colleges of the States.
Juneau must prepare for a considerable further increase
of population within the coming year, and thereafter, and no
time should be lost in making the necessary preparations, if the
fullest fruition is to be reaped from the increase of population,
and the expansion of business which it will bring.
The Turkish peace plenipotentiaries won't sit in that peace
conference unless the Greeks quit peppering the Turks with shot
and shell. Looks as though the Turks did have "a kick coming.*'
FISHERMEN ESCAPE FROM PEONAGE.
JUNEAU'S halibut fishing industry has undergone a transfor
mation within the past two weeks. The fishermen have emerged
from a condition of servitude to Seattle, since they have been
able to find a market at home for the product of their arduous
and hazardous toil. New life, and a new spirit have been injected
into the business of fishing, for the toilers of the sea are now no
longer at the mercy of unscrupulous Seattle fish dealers. They
no longer are robbed. They are not powerless as they were when
their catches found a market only in the Puget Sound city.
The making of Juneau a buying center of the halibut industry
by a Chicago company marks a distinctly new departure and
it should, ard will, stimulate its development in a substantial
manner.
Mr. Brooks, who represents the Chicago concern, expects to
ship out of the port of Juneau direct to Chicago one hundred
thousand pounds of fresh halibut every week, which means the
payment of about $7,500 weekly from one firm alone to local
fishermen?or more than $30,000 a month. And the fishermen
get their money here and are no longer the victims of the selfish,
dishonest greed of Outside dealers to whom, perforce, hitherto
they were compelled to ship their product.
What we have herein stated will serve to show the possi
bilities of the halibut industry at this port. Is it not well
worth fostering, encouraging, advancing in every legitimate
way? It seems to The Empire that it is high time its potential
growth and importance were fully realized by the people of this
section of Alaska.
Notary Public Clark, of Fairbanks, good easy man, was also
a most accommodating official, when he took his pen and seal in
hand. Wonder if he served all comers alike, or if he made an
exception in the case of the Fairbanks bankers?
THROWING ROCKS AT THE MONROE DOCTRINE.
S impression in the triple steel of the Monroe doctrine. Nei
IR WILFRID LAURIER'S darts are not likely to make any
ther will his assertion be taken seriously when he says that
the United States has made Cubans pay heavily "for its assist
ance by undermining the independence of their country."
When Sir Wilfrid made this statement he was merely in
dulging in hyperbole?for political effect. The United States
has not in any particular undermined the independence of Cuba.
On the other hand Cuba has thrice been saved from itself by
this country. Its independence has been preserved to the <
Cubans.
If it had been charged that the United States was police
man to Cuba and a few Central American alleged republics, we
might have admitted the truth of the assertion, but to the cred
it of this nation be it said it has exercised almost more than a
faherly care over the Cuban people, since it was responsible
for their independence in the first instance. To have left such
a mercurial people to their own resources, after thrusting them
suddenly into the light of freedom and liberty, would have been
an open invitation to anarchy in its most virulent form.
Cuba has been compelled to pay for the cost incurred by the
United States in restoring order in the island republic, but it
cannot be truthfully charged that there was any injustice in
that. That our intervention in Cuba was justified, is fully borne
out by the progress that is being made toward permanent peace
ful conditions and prosperity in that country.
The fly in the ointment of the people of other nations is our c
Monroe doctrine?something that is peculiarly our own and ?
something that will be preserved and defended. But the pass- p
ing of three quarters of a century has not reconciled them to it. a
And the near completion of the Panama Canal is arousing the h
jingo sentiment of other interested countries, and the ebullitions |
of their statesmen are to us merely airy persiflage. The Monroe
doctrine is an American institution. L
I I CHARICK
I I L J JEWELER
a0^? and OPTICIAN <
mllll lllllllllll ii iiiiiiimuiiiimimiiiiiiiimiim
ON ACTING WELL YOUR PART. ?
FME and honor and glory amounto but little, after all is said
and done. Men who but yesterday were high in the honor
roll of nations tomorrow are forgotten. It is truly only the
evil that men do that lives after them the good is too often in
terred with their bones.
The brave deeds of heroes are writ in the history of their
grateful country, to be sure, but even history grows dim and
musty and in the course of ages it becomes befogged and be
clouded with mythology and tradition. Of course our means
of preserving history are vastly improved upon that of ancient
times, but it is not so long in the lif< of this world since some of
the greatest men of all the ages, sang, wrote, lived, worked, suf
fered and died. Does not one recall "seven ancient cities claimed
the Homer dead, through which the living Homer begged his
bread ?" And yet no one knows whether such a person as Homer
ever lived. And Dante, although the Divine Comedy lives, what
do we know about the man? Or Virgil? Or Even William
Shakespeare, who has been proved so many times, by so many
erudite scholars, never to have existed; or if there were ever
such a personage, he was but an illiterate fellow unable to write
his own name, and fonder of beer than of literature. What is
fame then ? Sounding brass or a tinkling cymbal! And yet, man,
proud man, "dressed in a little brief authority cuts such fan
tastic tricks before high heaven as make the angels weep."
But yet again: "Honor and fame from no condition rise;
act well your part for there the honor lies."
Troubles never come singly. Here's Thomas W. Lawson, of
Boston, using grape and canister on Wall street, and now Con
gress threatens to take the stock gamblers by the neck.
In the meantime let us get busy on that federal building
project.
A GIN DAISY AND
A SABBATH CALM
? Any man or woman interested in
adding a few sterling recipes for de
lectable drinks cannot do better than
take their notebooks and pencils with
them to David Belasco's production
of the new Hatton comedy, "Years of
Discretion," which that manager will
present at Power's Theatre presently.
Bruce McKae, in the character of
I Michael Doyle, a one-time bartender,
now grown to a position of power in
N'ew York politics and society, is the
author of the recipes, and Frederic
and Fanr.y Hatton, who wrote the
play, are the owners of the copyright
thereto. For the benefit of the read
ers of this newspaper, "Mr. Doyle,"
through the mediumship of Mr. Mc
Rae, has compiled two of the most
popular as follows. The wording, it
may be remarked, is that of "Mich
ael Doyle," not of Bruce McRae:
"Ye snow it first (fill glass cracked
ice, presumably), then half one big
lemon and half one baby lime, twist
ed till they weep, three little triplets
of Gordon gin and a beautiful, pas
sionate, feminine pink jigger of gren
adine. Then a wicked taste of old
monk, yellow chartreuse? fizzy wa
ter upto the shaker top and a bit of
bar twirl. There's your Gin Daisy."
"Sabbath Calm Cocktail?Frost the
the 8torm( cracked ice), then five lit
tle fellows of good gin and two and
one-third little sisters of old ver
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION.
Case No. 940-A.
In the District Court for the District
of Alaska, Division No. 1, at
Juneau.
First National Bank of Juneau, Plain
tiff, vs.
Ellen G. Bach, Frank Bach, North
west Rubber Company, Schwabach
er Bros. & Co., Inc., defendants.
To the NORTHWEST RUBBER
COMPANY and SCHWABACHER
BROS. & CO., Inc., defendants,
GREETING:
In the name of the United States of
America and pursuant to an order of
the above entitled Court in the above
entitled cause ?made on the 6th day
jf November. 1912, you and each of
t'ou are hereby commanded to be and <
ippear in the above entitled court i
lolden at Juneau, in said Division, in i
taid Territory, and answer the com- <
plaint filed against you in the above i
?ntitled action within thirty days j
'rom the date of the last publication 1
lereof; and if you fail so to appear s
md answer for want thereof the j
>lalntiff will apply to the Court for 1
ind the Court will grant the relief <
iemanded in said complaint, to-wlt: '
rudginent on a promissory note <
igainst Frank Bach, in the sum of <
>ne thousand dollars ($1,000.00), <
vith interest thereon at the rate of *
welve per cent (12 per cent) per <
mnum, from the 24th day of May, <
909; one hundred dollars ($100.00) J
ittorney's fees; together with its ,
osts and disbursements herein in- <
urred; further for a decree foreclos- J
ng a certain mortgage upon certain <
iroperty situate in Douglas, Alaska, ?
gainst all the defendants herein. <
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have <
oreunto set my hand and affixed the 4
eal of the above entitled court this J
th day of November, 1912. <
E. W. PETTIT, Clerk.
First publication, November 5, 1912. J
.ast publication December 17, 1912.
mouth, a smile of orange, with a
swear of the peel, and two tears of
absinthe. And It's yourself that must
shake the mixture."?Chicago Exam
iner.
ADVERTISED LETTERS
List of letters remaining unclaimed
in the postofflce at Juneau, Alaska,
for the week ending Dec. 14, 1912.
Parties oalllng for them should ask
for "advertised" mail and give date
of list.
Anderson, Adolf S.; Anderson.
Emanuel; Bradford, G. A.; Blanchard,
Miss Ruby; Boglo, Tony; Brown, Dan
K.; Buster, Spencer; Clausen, Jacob
(card); Carter, Hooker; Church, Hen
ry; Dalker, Charles W.; DeFrance,
Earle; Frauguglla, A1 Signor Stefano;
Frye. Mrs. Riley; Hall, John; Hest
ness, Knut; Hemlin, Samuel (2);
HendrickBon, A.; Hoke, Geo.; Jailer
usk, Mr.; Jacobson, OUeg; Larson,
Ludvig; Mavros, Nick; Mayer, J. H.;
Mallory, C. C.; Newhan, G. C.; Nil
son, Knut; Olson, Thomas; Olson,
Tom (card); O'Nell, Daniel; Powe,
Thomas; Rodrlgnes, Jose; Sinnott,
Harry; Smith, John; Smith, Mrs. A.
P.; Sonderland, Ludvig; Thurby,
James; Welson, John; Wood, Ray
mond (2 cards); Worholm, K. B.;
Young E. (card); Young, P. L. (4).
E. L. HUNTER, P. M.
I have a lot of beautiful gold mount
ed fountain pens, of every make.
They make inexpensive, useful and
beautiful Christmas gifts.
E. Valentine's Jewelry Store, Juneau.
PittfeSsioincrt Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORN EYS-AT-L AW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. 8. Deputy 8urveyor
U. 8. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
( V. a? !
N. WATANABE
DENTI8T
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau - ? ? ? Alaska
Valentine's Store presents the sea
son's opportunity for pleasure and
economy in buying; delight and sat
isfaction in receiving. It insures a
Merry Christmas. ???
The United States of America,
District of Alaska.
WHEREAS, on the 13th day of De
comber, 1912, B. B. Metz and F. M.
Fisk filed a libel in the District Court
of the United States for the District
of Alaska, against the launch "Murre
let" her boats, tackles, apparel and
furniture, in a cause of wages Civil
and Maritime.
AND WHEREAS, by virtue of pro
cess in due form of law, to me di
rected, returnable on the 13th day of
January, 1913, 1 have seized and tak
en the said launch "Murrelet" and have
her in my custody.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
a District Court will be held in the
United States Court Room in the City
of Juneau, on the 13th day of January,
1913, for the trial of said premises,
and the owner or owners, .and all per
sons who may have or claim any in
terest, are hereby cited to be and ap
pear at the time and place aforesaid,
to show cause, if any they have, why
a final decree should not pass as 1
prayed.
H. L. FAULKNER,
U. S. Marshal.
Shackleford & Bayless, proctors for
libellants.
First date of publication Dec. 13,
last date, Jan. 1. 1913.
?
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Kllllsnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17. 23, 29,
Pec. 5, 11, 17. 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16. 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4. 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com- "
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3. 9. 15, 21, 27. Dec. 3,
9, 1G, 21, 27, Jan. 2. 8. 14, 20. .
26, Feb. 1. 7, 13, 19. 25, March
3. 9, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer ?, S. HUMBOLDT I The Alaeka Flyer
NORTHBOUND v. . DEC 19
80UTHB0UND .....DEC. 21
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Scattlo OIIlco, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
?I'M I I I-H I I I I 1 I 1 M I 1 I I 1 I I I 1 1 I III I I I 1 III I I I II H II I I 1 I
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS
BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY !!
STEAMSHIP DOLPHIN
? NORTH DEC. 14
^ SOUTH DEC. 15. !!
Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through
tickets to San Francisco.
ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. !'
?H 1 1 I I 1 I ! Ill I 1 1 I- !? Ill III III III I III 1 I III 1 III 1 111 II 1 Ml I
NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 14
First Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORO, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSON & CO., Douglas
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson. Prince Rupert, Swanaon, Alert Bay. Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY DEC. 19
Front and Sewnrd St?. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICK ETT, A si.
?; 1111 n 111 n 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111
ALASKA COAST CO. ii
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
!! Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU 1!
! S. S. YUKON DEC. 21 !!
SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA l!
| connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports J'
; S. S. YUKON DEC. 13 ? ?
Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? ?
| For further Information apply to
S. H. Ewlng, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle
? I I I I H I I I Mi I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU. DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau forj
Douglas and (
Trcadwoll |
?8:00 a. ir..
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trcad
wcll for
Juneau
?8:25 a. m. I
9:25 a. m. |
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leave*
Douglna for j
Juneau
?8:30 a. m.
9:30 a.m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
|11:30 p. m.
! Leaves Juneau daily I
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
1 4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. in.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Niicht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
^Sunda^jchedul^ameaajibovejsxc?^
?H-H-t-H-fr-H-H M M-H-IM-M IH-IH-H-1 III i 1 I III HI I ill I I II I"
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX |
j Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan T
; COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME I
! FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA $
H-!"!"!"!"!"!"!"!11!11!"!"!"!1!1! III I-1 1-1 Ill 1 !? Ill 11 Mi 111 ill ill II II 1
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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