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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 17, 1912, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE!
J. F. A. STRONG
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postofllco at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
0?e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per mouth, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU. ALASKA. DECEMBER 17. 1912.
SECRETARY FISHER AND A TRUNK RAILROAD.
SECRETARY of the Interior Walter L. Fisher favors a trunk
line railroad from tidewater that will first reach the Mat-!
anuska coal fields and then some point on the Tanana or
the Yukon rivers. While the press dispatches do not state the
point on tidewater preferred by the Secretary, the inference
is that Seward is the place. The Alaska Northern railway ex
tends toward the Matanuska coal fields for a distance of seventy
one miles, and Mr. Fisher probably has in mind the leasing or
purchasing of this road.
The American Mining Congress?and we scarcely know
what to make of that body?goes Mr. Fisher one better, for it
recommends that the government build two railroads from the
coast to the interior, probably on the theory that if one road is
a good thing two will be better.
That a trunk railroad is needed will be admitted; and the
point on tidewater that shall be selected is of importance only
to those towns which would like to be its terminus. One rail
road. however, would do very nicely at the beginning and the
recommendation of the American Mining Congress for the con-j
struction of two is not likely to meet with even a faint response.
The time will come when the need for two or more railroads will
be demonstrated, but that time is not yet.
There is very little upon which to predicate an opinion as
to what the next Congress and the incoming administration will
do in the settlement of the railroad transportation question, j
The Democratic policy as regards the opening up of Alaska has |
been foreshadowed in the national platform of the party, but the
buliding and operation of government railroads are not men
tioned. A liberal policy, however, is predicted, and this may
well include governmental aid in the important matter of rail-1
road transportation to the coal fields and the interior country.
GETTING THE BEST OF UNCLE SAM.
SOME otherwise good people think that there is no harm in
cheating the government in a matter of business. If they
can by devious means get a few dollars more from the govern
ment for labor performed or services rendered than they would
ask from the private citizen they easily square it with their
consciences. It is no harm to overcharge the government they
reason. The "government" is everybody's prey, these folks
believe.
This seems to have been the view taken by Messrs. Bullock
and Houston when they boosted the price of coal that they sold
to Uncle Sam, in Alaska, much above the price paid by individ
uals. No one need waste sympathy on thes* men or their con
geners. The man who steals from the government is just as
much a thief as the man who steals from his next door neigh
bor. It is a question of morals, but such morals turpitude sel
dom receives the condemnation (hat it merits.
Tere are men who would defraud the government who
would not think of cheating their fellow man. Such is the frail
ty of human nature. These belong to the class of men who
swear no false oaths except at the customs house"?another
favored way of getting the best of the government.
Houston and Bullock were both "good business men."
They had arrived at the years of discretion long before they en
tered into collusion to get some "easy money" on Alaska coal
contracts. Of course they did not count the cost of their act.
They speciously reasoned that everybody was doing it, so why
should they not take a little of Uncle Sam's usufruct. The pris
on house did not loom upon their vision?then.
And the end is not yet. The same government which these
men defrauded knowingly and wilfully demands restitution and
a bad matter is thus further complicated and the principals are
to be held accountable for the acts of their agents. Defraud
ing "the government" is really getting to be a crime of some |
consequence.
THE ALTERNATIVE PRESENTED TO THE TURK.
THE Balkan States delegates now in London for the purpose
of arranging terms of peace with Turkey are quoted as say
ing that peace will be concluded before New Year, or failing
that, it will be enforced at Constantinople with cannon and bay
onet before Easter. This is a direct threat, and an ominous one,
coming from the mouths of men whose mission is peace.
The day of adversity is upon the Turk and kindly words
are now said of him because he possesses engaging qualities.
His moderation, his honesty have been praised and war corres
pondents attest his patience and his valor.
The trouble with the Turk is not his personality, but his
governmental system, which he inherited, and his too faithful
adherence to a religion which handicaps progress. His political
ideas are those of the eighteenth century, but this clinging to
the remnants of his rule over Bulgarians, Servians and Greeks
is not without parallel in more recent times.
According to statements made by missionaries and others, the
outrages that have marked the rule of the Turk have often been
committed by conscripts who were not Turks; and sometimes
by Christians who were fighting the Turks. Worship under the
Christian religion has long been permitted in Turkey, and Tur
kish Sultans have made less political use of the Patriarchs than
Christian Emperors did before them.
But the Turk has no business lording it over other races in
Europe. That is now stopped. That it continued so long is not
more his fault than it is that of the Christian powers. Where
his race predominates over any other, as it does in Constantino
ple, he may be best left in control with the reflection that he
is stronger without his unwilling subjects. Perhaps then his
courage, his generosity and power to command may be turned 1
to home needs and political progress.
The map of Europe, however, is about to undergo a change j
?whether it be accomplished peacefully at London or with bay
onet and cannon at Constatinople. j
I CHARICK
I.J. J???AN,
1111111ii1111111111111 II i
THE IMPEACHMENT OF JUDGE ARCHBALD.
THE evidence in the impeachment proceedings in the United
States Senate against Judge Robert W. Archbald has been
concluded, which reminds us that impeachment as a practi
cal and expeditious process for the recall of unfit officials was
not helped in the public mind, when the Senate last summer put
over the trial to the short session.
The proceedings developed obstructive and hairsplitting ten
dencies, in the attitude of Senators to the case, we are told. Not
alone has Judge Archbald been on trial. The impeachment pro
cess itself has been on trial, and the Senate in its handling of
that process has been on trial.
Judge Archbald is charged with having accepted substan
tial favors from litigants before his court. Notwithstanding
criticisms of the Senate as to its delay in its hearing of the
case, it would seem as if the proceedings have been brought to
a fairly quick conclusion. As a court of law, however, the Sen
ate is bound only by the board and elastic constitutional provision,
which, in effect, makes any act inconsistent with a proper and
unbiased conduct of the office, ground for conviction and remov
al; which recognizes that standards of private conduct do
change. If the Senate shall arrive at an early decision of the
case?as is probable?it will have demonstrated the needlessness
of radical changes in the procedure of removal for unfit public
officials. The founders of our government intended impeach
ment to be an easily workable process, but in the few times that
it has been tried it has proved cumbersome and dilatory.
TEN COMMANDMENTS
GIVEN FOR HEALTH
"Ten commandments of good citi
..onship" Issued by the housing com
mittee of the Chicago Woman's Aid
nre included in the health bulletin,
which declares Chicago to be the
healthiest big city In the world. Tho
commandments are:
I. Thou shalt honor thy city and
keep Its laws.
II. fteinember thy cleaning day and
keep It wholly.
III. Thou shalt love and cherish thy
children and provide for them
decent homes and playgrounds.
IV. Thou shalt not keep thy windows
closed day or night
V. Thou shalt keep order In thy
alley, thy back yard, thy hall
and stairway.
VI. Thou shalt not kill thy neigh
bor's bodies with poisonous air,
nor their souls with bad com
panions.
VII. Thou shalt not let the wicked
fly live.
VIII. Thou shalt not steal thy chil
dren's right to happiness from
them.
IX. Thou shalt bear witness against
thy neighbor's rubbish heap.
X. Thou shalt covet all the air and
sunshine thou canst obtain.
Health Commissioner Young ac
companies the "commandments" with
warnings against Insufficient ventila
.Ion. His "airy paragraphs" follow:
"Dirty air kills more people than
dirty milk, water and food combined."
"The best method of ventilation Is
to open the window."
"Too much fresh air is Just enough."
"Good housing promotes health,
life, morality, success and ambition."
"Bad housing promotes failure, stu
pidity, crime, disease and death."
The annual board bill for Chicago's
SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION.
Case No. 940-A.
In the District Court for the District
of Alaska, Division No. 1, at
Junoau.
First National Bank of Juneau, Plain
tiff, vs.
Ellen G. Bach, Frank Bach, North
west Rubber Company, Schwabach
er Bros. & Co., Inc., defendants.
To the NORTHWEST RUBBER
COMPANY and SCHWABACHER
BROS. & CO., Inc., defendants,
GREETING:
In the name of the United States of '
America and pursuant to an order of ;
the above entitled Court in the above ,
entitled cause made on the 5th day ?
of November, 1912, you and each of J
you are hereby commanded to be and
appear in the above entitled court
holden at Juneau, in said Division, in
said Territory, and answer the com
plaint filed against you in the above
entitled action within thirty days
from the date of the last publication
hereof; and if you fall so to appear
and answer for want thereof the
plaintiff will apply to the Court for
and the Court will grant the relief
demanded in said complaint, to-wlt:
Judgment on a promissory note
against Frank Bach, in the sum of
one thousand dollars ($1,000.00),
with interest thereon at the rate of J
twelve per cent (12 per cent) per <
annum, from the 24th day of May, <
1909; one hundred dollars ($100.00) 1
attorney's fees; together with its <
costs and disbursements herein in- i
curred; further for a decree foreclos- ]
ing a certain mortgage upon certain <
property situate in Douglas, Alaska, j
against all the defendants herein. J
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have ]
hereunto set my hand and affixed the 1
seal of the.above entitled court this J
5th day of November, 1912. 4
E. W. PETTIT, Clerk. j
First publication, November 5, 1912. j
[.ast publication December 17, 1912. 4
rat population exceeds $3,000,000 ac
| cording to the bulletin, which estl
j mates that there are two rats to each
human being in the United States.
| Kats cost England and Prance $100,
1000 a yoar, while In India there aro
ten times as many rats as human be
ings.
Comparison of death rates in the
| large cities of the world show Chica
go has the lowest of all, the deaths
per thousand during the last ten
years being only 14.7. New York Is
seventh on the list, with 18 per thous
and. Calcutta has a death rate of 31
| per thousand, the highest In the list
CULLOM KEPT PROMISE
HE MADE TO LINCOLN.
WASHINGTON, D. C. ? Senator
Shelby M. Cullom, of Illinois, oldest
member In point of service In the up
per branch of Congress, entered on
his eighty-fourth year, on Nov. 23 .
The aged Senator, who, when he
leaves his seat March 4, will have
completed thirty years of continuous
service In Congress, Is looking for
ward to a well-earned rest Ho told
friends today how It was he first
decided to come to Congress.
"The night Abraham Lincoln left
Springfield for Washington to bo In
augurated," said the Senator, '"I at
tended a reception given for him. 1
said to him:
" 'I am coming to Congress while
you are President*
"He replied:
" 'Well, Mr. Speaker, come on.'
"L was then Speaker of the Illin
ois Legislature. I kept my word and
was elected when he was re-elected,
but he was assassinated before I
took my seat."
The Senator was to have studied:
law In the office of the great emancl
"pator, but he said that Mr. Lincoln
felt he could not give to the young,
aspirant the timo and attention that
were necessary.
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau j
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEY8-AT-LAW
Decker Building *
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. 8. Deputy Surveyor
U. 8. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau I
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Junoau .... Alaska
I have a lot of beautiful gold mount
ed fountain pens, of every make.
They make Inexpensive, useful and
beautiful Christmas gifts.
E. Valentine's Jewelry Store, Juneau. 1
The United States of America,
. District of Alaska.
WHEREAS, on the 13th day of De
cember, 1912, B. B. Metz and F. M.
Flak filed a libel in the District Court
of the United States for the District
of Alaska, against the launch "Murre-!
let" her boats, tackles, apparel and'
furniture, In a cause of wages Civil i,
and Maritime. I.
AND WHEREAS, by virtue of pro- 1
cess In due form of law, to me di- ]
rected, returnable on the 13th day of ,
January, 1913, I have seized and tak- 1
n the said launch "Murrelet" and have ]
her In my custody. ,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
a District Court will be hold in the j
United States Court Room In the City .
of Juneau, on the 13th day of January,
1913, for the trial of said premises, ]
and the owner or owners, and all per- .
sons who may have or claim any in
terest, are hereby cited to be and ap- '
pear at the time and place aforesaid,
to Bhow causo, if any they have, why
a final decree should not pasB as '
prayed.
H. L. FAULKNER,
U. S. Marshal.
Shackleford & Bayless, proctors for
libellant8.
First date of publication Dec. 13,
last date, Jan. 1. 1913.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Kllllsnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11. 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22. 28, Fob. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
LeaveB Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15. 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14. 20.
26, Fob. 1. 7, 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9, 16, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. |
Tho Aloakn Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT I The Alaxka Flyer
NORTHBOUND DEC 19
SOUTHBOUND DEC. 21
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Office, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
."l-l-l-11 111 111 I 11 1 1 ?! U 1 -1 H 1 11 1 I 1 1 1 11 1 111 1 1 1 1 1 1 111 1 1 1 1 1?
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
- STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- ??
! BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY !!
STEAMSHIP DOLPHIN
? NORTH DEC. 14
! SOUTH DEC. 15. !!
! Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through
| tickets to San Francisco. j*
! ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. !*
r-H"I I M 1 1 I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I- I-I-l- I-l 1 I 1 M 1 1 M 111 M m 1 I 1 111 Ii
NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY j
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 30
First Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSON & CO., Douglas
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C. Coast Service
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpaon. Prince Rupert, Swanson, Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY DEC. 19
Front and Seward St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT, Aitt.
:-H-l I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I i I I I I I II H
:! ALASKA COAST CO. ij
' ? For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
il Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU "
S. S. YUKON DEC. 21 I
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA !!
I connecting at Seattle for San Franci6co and Southern California ports | \
S. S. YUKON - r DEC. 13 ??
; Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? >
; For further Information apply to
S. H. Ewlng, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle jj
M I I I I I 1 I I II 8 H I I I C I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
l.v. Juneau for
Douglna and
Treadwcll
?8:00 a. nr..'
9:00 a. in.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. ra.
3:00 p. m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trcacl
wcll for
Juneau
?8:25 a. m. I
9:25 a. m. I
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m. ]
6:55 p. m. !
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaves
Douglas tor. 11
Juneau
*8:30 a. m.
9:30 a. in.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leave* Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. ra.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
From Junrau for
Shoop Creek
Saturday Night Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule amc art above. except trip leaving J'iii-mB i |
1 III I I M I 1 111 111 III III I III 1 1 1 I I III III III 1 M I 1 I III 1 i
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX 1
I) Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan
[I COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME !!
!! FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA ?
H-H-l'I1! .|"1"I.'1"1"1"!-H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I ! 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 I I I 1 1 1 I I 1 I 1 1 I
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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