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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 18, 1912, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912 at the postolQce at Ju
neau, Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
0?e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail : 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU. ALASKA. DECEMBER 18. 1912.
PROGRESS THAT MAKES THE WHEELS MOVE.
THE present visit of Col. D. C. Jackling to Juneau emphasizes
the fact that has been heretofore apparent that great and
permanent mining enterprises will shortly have their seat
in this immediate section. Mines that will continue to be pro
ducers for generations are not found in every mining country.
Yet this is just what some of the mines promise that are now
producing as well as other that are in process of development.
One must stop for a moment in order to take in the full sig
nificance of such a statement. The immensity of the operations
in the mining of quartz and the reduction of its valuable con
tents mean the employment of an army of men and the upbuild
ing of not one but several communities. It means new lines of
human activity, new enterprises that will make the desert blos
som and the barren places produce fruit.
The possibilities of Alaska are beyond comprehension.
There is not an Alaskan now living who can find even a faint
conception of what the productive powers of this commonwealth
will be fifty or a hundred years hence. It will be peopled: it will
have a hundred producing mines where there are but two or
three. Towns and cities, villages and hamlets will dot its sur
face and it will be the greatest scene of mining activities on the
American continent.
And the panhandle of Alaska doubtless will lead the proces
sion of advancement because of its great bodies of ores and its
other natural resources, its geographical location and its equa
ble climate. These are factors in the development of a country
that stand out pre-eminently and invite the energies of man
kind. Southeastern Alaska today offers greater possibilities
in the way of mining and other industries than any other por
tion of continental America. Just remember this and watch
the fast coming developments.
A band of militant suffragettes are mushing from New
York to Albany to demand the vote. Bet they'll need new straw
in their muckluks before they reach Poughkeepsie.
A Pensylvania Democrat is said to have offered $500 for
a postmaster. He is not a Democrat. He is simply a Penn
sylvanian.
SIGNIFICANCE OF ALASKA'S SALMON INDUSTRY.
ACCORDING to the annual report of Secretary of Commerce
and Labor Nagel, the Alaska salmon out-turn this year is
valued at $14,500,000. It is a large sum for a single nat
ural industry, and it emphasizes in striking figures the urgent
need that exists for adequate protection and conservation of the
industry. If it be preserved for the people of Alaska?as it un
doubtedly should?it will become with each passing year a more
and more potential and permanent asset of the territory. The
salmon canning industry last year was valued at a little less
than $15,000,000, and if the output of the present year and last
year is continued for five more years the total aggregate value
would be upwards of $100,000,000. The figures are surprising
only when one does not stop to consider their meaning and im
port. In seven years $100,000,000, in fourteen years $200,000,
000?in a generation nearly $500,000,000. These figures allow
for now increase or decrease. But with proper laws, strictly en
forced and with intelligently directed artificial propagation of
the species there should be a substantial increase from year
to year instead of a decrease.
Pardoning several hundred prisoners in order to kill a pro
posed bad law, as Governor Donaghey, of Arkansas, did the other
day may be a case of the end justifying the means. Nonethe
less, the means are drastic.
A woman in Boston has been convicted as a loan shark. Is
there any masculine activity in which women are not now en
gaged?
THE MEANING OF WILSON'S ELECTION?
A PORTION of the newspaper press of the United States is
trying to comfort itself and its readers by stating with con
siderable iteration that because Woodrow Wilson failed to
obtain a majority of the popular vote, nothing was definitely de
cided by the election. Some people are fond of even cold com
fort. But let us refer to history. In the campaign of 1860 Lin
coln polled only 1,866,352 votes to 2,810,501 polled by Douglas
Breckenridge and Bell. The popular majority against Lincoln
was nearly 1,000,000.
Yet if we are to believe the wiseacres who are trying to de
lude themselves, reasoning from similar premises noth
ing was definitely decided by Lincoln's election.
In the campaign of this year Wilson polled 6,158,478 votes to i
7,304,568 polled by Taft and Roosevelt. Wilson polled a larger
percentage of the vote than did Lincoln, yet we find newspapers !
which ought to be intelligent informing their readers that [
there is no clearness in the mandate, that nobody can say wheth
er the verdict is for or against protection or for or against any <
particular trust or currency proposal. 1
Nobody after the election of 1860 could say that the popu
lar mandate was for or against any particular method of deal- (
ing with the slavery question; yet both the North and the South
knew beyond a doubt that slavery had been definitely disap
proved. The meaning of Wilson's election is just as plain as 1
the meaning of Lincoln's election. Privilege, plutocracy and pri- j
vate partnerships with the government have been voted do.wn.
MR. WILSON IS SIZING UP TIMBER.
WHAT is this that Uncle Woodrow Wilson says concerning ,
a "political" and a "personal" Cabinet? We assume that t
the statement accredited to him has created consternation in r
many a Democratic bosom since it found its way into print. Yet
his language is plain, but whether his smile was childlike and
bland when he said it has not been chronicled. He says that he
is debating whether he shall have a cabinet constructed of pure
ly political material or a personal cabinet made up of men whose C
fitness for the different position is known to him, and upon whose
judgment he would like to lean.
I I CHARICK
I.
I 11?I I I II 11nI I I I I I I I I I I
The statement is concrete, but it involves abstract ques- I
tions. Mr. Wilson evidently has in mind whether he shall listen
to the demands of political geography and exigency or select men
for cabinet positions wherever he may find them.
Mr. Cleveland went outside of his own party to find a Sec
retary of State for his second cabinet and Mr. Taft had one
Democrat in his cabinet for a time, and still has one that form
erly gave his allegiance to that party. But these selections were
rather those of geography and expediency than of personal
choice.
Mr. Wilson is not going outside of the party preserves to
pick a cabinet, but he will be likely to consult his owndesires
rather than the demands of political exigencies.
So long as he does not gather about him a "kitchen cabi
net" the country probably will be safe.
President Taft says that he will not name a successor to
Ambassador Reid. He seems to have seen the futility of elev
enth hour appointments in the teeth of a saintly?and exceed
ingly hungry?Democracy.
When Greek meets Turk, then comes the tug of war.
CARELESSNESS CAUSES
RAILROAD WRECKS
WASHINGTON. Dec. 17.?The In
terstate Commerce Commission in its
annual report which has been. sub
mitted to Congress, holds that care
lessness Is the cause of most of the
railroad wrecks of the country.
GOVERNOR HUNT
OPPOSES HANGING
PHOENIX, Ariz.. Dec. 17.?Gover
nor George W. P. Hunt has refused
to permit executions in the state pen
itentiary, on teh request of three
Counties of the State which have crim
inals awaiting hanging. As a result
of the governor's stand Judge Sloan
of this County sentenced John B. Gor
don, convicted of murder, to be hanged
at Globe, on March 14.
HIS IDEAS OF
THE COLONEL
Little Tom Kendrick, son of Mr.
and Mrs. W. E. Kendrick, surprised
his parents the other evening by pro
ducing a pencil drawing of Colonel
Roosevelt, true to life, including eye
glasses and teeth?but Tom clothed
the Colonel in skirts.
INFORMER WEBBER
GOES TO CHINA.
NEW YORK. Dec. 17. ? Brldgio
Webber, the informer in the Rosen
thal cases, and his wife have sailed
for China by way of Havana, Buenos
Ayres and Valparaiso. Webber was
second in importance only to Jack
Rose in the conviction of Police Lieu
tenant Becker and the four gunmen in
the murder of Herman Rosenthal last
July.
Webber declared that he did not
expect to stay in China. "All I want
is to get away for a wihle," he said.
SAN DOMINGO AGAIN
CHANGES PRESIDENT.
SAN DOMINGO. Dec. 17. ? Arch
bishop Nouel, who a few days ago
was elected president of the San Do
mingo republic, has resigned. The isl
and republic is being watched by a
United States warship to prevent the
renewal of disorder.
VALDEZ WOMAN HAS
MENTAL BREAKDOWN.
Mrs. E. F. German, wife of Dr.
German a Valdez dentist, was a pas
senger on the Mariposa for the
Morningside, Ore., sanitarium, which
she has been committed for treatment.
Mrs. German has been afflicted for
some year with a goitre and this to
gether with a worry over her illness
culminated in a mental breakdown,
which is believed, however, to be
enly temporary. Mrs. German was
accompanied by Mrs. Fred Brown and
Mrs. J. S. Graham, of Valdez, Deputy
Marshal Sullivan and Norman Mer
chant.
Diamonds, always a wise Invest
ment, are unusually bo at this time.
Dure are imported under auspices so
'avorable as to enable us to offer
rou better values than we believe
you'll obtain elsewhere.
L J. SHARRICK.
Christmas flowers?carnation, holly,
riolets, chrysanthemums?at the Win
er & Pond Store. Place your order
low. tf.
Winter demands warm furs. W. H. <
7ASE has them in sets for Christmas. <
<
<
Now is the time to buy holly at J
lOLDSTEIN'S. . ??? <
<
Job Printing at The Empire Office. ^
The Empire 1
????????
1
for <
I
Job Printing!
?- i
Good Stock 1
i
Plus
Modem Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
}
Professional Cards
?
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
Lewla Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW =
? ?
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORN EY8-AT-L AW !!
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. 8. Deputy 8urveyor *'
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau 4
I
N. WATANABE
DENTI8T
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
The United States of America, .
District of Alaska.
WHEREAS, on the 13th day of De- ;
comber, 1912, B. B. Metz and P. M.
Fisk filed a libel in the District Court '
of the United States for the District
of Alaska, against the launch "Murrc
let" her boats, tackles, apparel and J
furniture, In a cause of wages Civil
md Maritime.
AND WHEREAS, by virtue of pro
cess in due form of law, to me di
rected, returnable on the 13th day of
January, 1913, I have seized and tak
n the Bald launch "Murrelet" and have ,
ter In my custody.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
i District Court will be held in the
United States Court Room in the City
of Juneau, on tho 13th day of January, .
1913, for the trial of said premises,
ind the owner or owners, and all per
sons who may have or claim any In
terest, are hereby cited to bo and ap
pear at the time and place aforesaid,
X) show cause, if any they have, why
i final decree should not pass as
grayed.
H. L. FAULKNER,
U. S. Marshal.
Shackleford & BayleBs, proctors for
lbellants.
First date of publication Dec. 13,
ast date, Jan. L 1913.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves ,
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum, 7
Tcnakee, Klllisnoo and Sitka? I
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 6, 11, 17, 23, 29. Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22, 28. Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, !!
March 5. 11, 17, 23 and 29. j
Leaves Juneau for Funter and ; |
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17, J
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21, +?
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00 "
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15. 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9. 15, 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
????????????????????????????
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. j
The Alnrku Flyer : S. S. HUMBOLDT I The Aleak* Flyer
NORTHBOUND DEC 19
SOUTHBOUND DEC. 21
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ofllco, 71G Second Ave. GEO. BUREORD. Agent
?1-H-l 1111 I"1"H 1 1 111 111 111 1 111 1 111 1 1 1 M 111 Ml 1 1 1 1 11 1 1"H
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO. j
STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN. VVRANGEL, PETERS- t
BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY I
STEAMSHIP DOLPHIN $
NORTH DEC. 14 ?
SOUTH DEC. 15. |
Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through .|
tlckets to San Francisco. ?
ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. T
?H-H-l 111 III 111 1 I 1"1"1 M 1111 l-l-l-l 1 1 I 111 111 HI HI 1 MI 111 f
NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY I
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 30
First Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSON & CO., Douglas
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpnon. Prince Rupert. Su-anaon, Alert Boy. Vancouver
Victoria and Scuttle
PRINCESS MAY DEC. 19
Front and Scwnrd Sta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE j. t. spickett. ast.
sh h t+i w-h m iit 111 hi i hi i 11 i 111 n 1111 i 11 i 11111 h i
ALASKA COAST CO. f
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU II
S. S. YUKON DEC. 21 X
SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA !!
connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports 11
S. S. YUKON .... DEC. 13 ?>
Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice.
For further information apply to
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ;;
?I I I I I I I I I I I I||1|I|I||||I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Doufrlait and
Treadwell
"?8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.'
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread- !
well for
Juneau
?8:25 a.m.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaves
Douglas for
Juneau
?8730 a . m7
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. tn.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
i From Juneau for
Sheep Crock
i Saturday Night Only
1 11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule same as above, except trip leaving Junca a at 8 a. m. in omitted |
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX J
Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan !!
COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME I!
FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA +
?: i; 11: i m 1111 m i i 11 m i! 11 m i i i1 m m m 111 m m m
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Rock. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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