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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 23, 1912, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. 1, NO. 43. JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1912. PRICE TEN CENTS
BOMB EXPERTS ALSO FOUND IN INDIA
McDonald Wires
He Will Come Here
A Sensation was created in the dis
trict court this morning over the open
ing of the alleged secret indictment
of Joe .McDonald for the murder of
N. C. Jones, some years ago. This
morning Mr. Cobb arose in court and
stated that he had been instructed
by wire from Joseph McDonald to say
to the court, and district attorney's
office, that if there was an indictment
pending against him. extradition
would not be necessary but he would
appear for trial at any time that it
suited the government. Mr. Cobb
further stated that he had sought to
take up the matter with the district
attorney but the district attorney de
clined to discuss the matter on the
ground that it was still a secret in
dictment. Judge Overfield asked that
the matter be taken up in chambers.
The Kmpire asked Mr. Cobb where
Mr. McDonald was but he declined
to discuss the matter at all until tho
court had taken some action.
On Dec. 17 the grand Jury after
several days of investigation and the
taking of testimony from witnesses
that had been summoned from far
and distant points in the United
States brought in a secret indictment.
Everybody in town was practically
certain of the case under investigation
aud against whom the indictment was
found, nevertheless public policy and
respect for law and at the request
of the court. The Dally Em
pire withheld any reference to
the matter, other than the simple
announcement of fact. The publica
tion to the efTect that the secret in
dictment found that day was against
Joe McDonald together with a part
of the testimony taken at the coron
er's inquest created great indignation
amougst members of the grand jury.
One member, Mr. Achison, who lives
in Skagway, refused to go home al
though he had been excused from fur
ther service, until the publisher of tho
publication was summoned before the
grand jury.
The district attorney's office, as
well as the attorneys for Mr. McDon
ald, are Incensed over the publication
'of the proceedings at this time. Tho
testimony taken at the coroner's in
quest ten years was loaned by
Judge J. F. Malony under express in
structions that it must not be pub
lished and the pledge of faith exacted
that it would not be printed. The
publicity given the matter makes it
practically impossible for the trial to
be held in Juneau.
Mr. McDonald has been a resident
of Mexico for several years, it is
said.
GREAT PROGRESS OE DEVELOPMENT
WORK OUT AT SALMON CREEK
The only way to get a proper con
ception of the development work that
is done and and is being done on the
creeks at hte present time is to go
out and see for oneself.
The Alaska-Gastineau Company has
done a great deal of work during the
past five months in their power de
velopment project at Salmon creek.
People who live in town accept the
statement along with the results, but
give little thought to initiative and en
ergy that bring results.
Since last June, practically all of
the work, in that division of the com
pany's activities, has been brought
to its present stage of development.
The first unit of the great power
project is now practically completed.
The big tlume. 4x6 feet, is t>41 finished
from the lower dam to the penstock,
a distance of 12,000 feet. The foun
dation for this flume is cut out of
the mountain side at an elevation of
nearly 400 feet. In many places heavy
rock cuts were encountered, and
throughout the entire distance the
right of way was filled with heavy
spruce which called for generous use
of powder.
The penstock will be finished be-j
fore Christmas, and then the watere
of Salmon creek can be turned into
their new channel of usefulness. There
remains, however, a few days work in
the power house before this is fin
ished.
Machinists and engineers are driv
ing the work rapidly, but even at that
it takes time to set heavy machinery.
The bearings are set for the pair
of great pelton wheels between which
will swing the immense generator.
When these things begin to turn in
working condition 1,500 kilowats of
new electric energy will be transport
ed to the mine and tunnel develop
ments of the company. There are
about thirty men employed at the pow
er house or beach camp.
At the lower dam camp the saw
mill is busy cutting timbers to be
used in the construction of the great
dam two miles further up the basin.
There are about twenty-five men all
told working here.
At the site of the upper dam an
other force of men numbering about
twenty-five is busily engaged in pre
paring the ground for the construc
tion of the great work. Just a few
days ago one crew commenced work
on the tunnel which is to bo driven
up to tap the bottom of the basin res
ervoir. The weather conditions so
far have been a great deal better than
could be expected.
There is scarcely any snow to be
encountered. The tram road is clear
from the upper dam to the beach and
supplies move freely. Everybody is
cheerful along the line and there
seems to be no reason w-hy the work
should not keep moving at the same
pace that marked the finish of the
first unit.
SKAGWAY PANSIES
COME TO EMPIRE
The Daily Empire this morning re
ceived a beautiful Christmas remem
brance from Skagwav. It is good to see,
and what it is may be gather from the
following accompanying card: "Please
accept a few of Skagway's noted pan
sies, as Mr. Dedman says we can
grow them?and do." The Empire is
quite satisfied that Skagwav can and
does, and appreciates the beautiful
- testimony and the spirit that prompt
ed it. The card and pansies come
from Mrs. W. L. Speer, of Skagway.
A WORK OF ART
The Daily Empire acknowledges the
receipt of a handsome work of art
in the shape of a 1913 calendar, from
the Sanitary Grocery. It is one of
the most artistic of the season's of
ferings in this line.
? Remember that R. P. Nelson's is
the only place in Juneau where yon
can get Huyler's celebrated candies;
which are the best made. Cf
MAN CRAZED WITH
VERY BAD WHISKEY
A man giving the name of Teddj
Collins and claiming to have com<
from Ketchikan was arrested lasi
night by Nightwatchman Sam Cohn
The fellow was crazy drunk ant
yelling like a frenzied savage. H<
was taken to the city jail. This morn
Ing he is still insane. Captain Mar
tin says he will hold him a whili
pending developments.
COMMERCIAL CAFE
TABLE d' HOTE DINNER
Christmas Day, 1912
75 cents
Served from Noon Until 8 p. m.
Hors d' Oeuvres
Anchovies Stavangcr
Caviar Astrakan
Soups
| Mock Turtle ala Anglaise
Consomme Savoyarde
Fish
Filet of Sole, Tartar Sauce
Entree
| Capon Liver Omelette, a la Victoria
Roast
Stuffed Young Turkey with
Cranberry Sauce
Vegetable
Baked Potatoes Petit Pols
Potatoes in Cream Asparagus Tips
Desserts
Ye Old English Plum Pudding, Hard
and Brandy Sauce
Roman Punch Fromage de Brie
> Cafe Oemltasse
Phone 381 to Reserve Boxes or Tables
SECOND TRIAL OF
AL LUNDGREN
The second trial of A1 Lundgrer
r on the charge of giving liquor to In
; dians is on today. A special venire
t for 18 was ordered, there being bul
. .two or three of the regular pane
1 qualified to sit on the case.
;
The Arctic Barber Shop will worl
?- four chairs on December 24th untl
b 10:30 p. m. On Christmas Day w<
will be open until noon. 2t
CASTRO COMING
TO NEW YORK
NEW YORK, Dec. 23.--Emilo Cas
tro the former firebrand president of
Venezuela Is a passenger on the
steamship Touralne bound for this
port.
WASHINGTON, Dec. 23.?It is prob
able that the United States authorities
will not permit Castro to land.
JUDGE OVERFIELD
GOING TO VALDEZ
Sometime ago Judge Overflcld sit
ting in the district court here, was
subpoenaed by mail to appear as a
witness in the Washington-Alaska
bank trials now being held In Val
dez. With the subpoenae came in
structions that telegraphic advices
would be sent when he should bo
wanted.
The advico was received today and
Judge Overfleld is to take the Mari
posa for Valdez. This morning Judge
Overfleld called the civil calondnr
consisting of about 75 cases but un
der the circumstances the causes will
not progress very rapidly.
In addition to the burdensome civil
calendar there are several very im
portant criminal prosecutions now un
der way. There are In the neighbor
hood of 75 government witnesses
now waiting to be called. District
Attorney Rustgard is quite disturbed
over the situation that has arisen and
has wired a long protest to the attor
ney-general.
WELL KNOWN COUPLE
MARRIED IN JUNEAU
On Saturday evening, at the resi
dence of Mr. mnd Mrs. H. J. Loren
zen, the Rev. J. B. Stevens united in
marriage Walter Alexander, of Haines,
and Miss Nancy Lee Mclntyre, of So-,
attle.
Both the high contracting parties
are well known and have hosts of
friends who Wish them happiness.'
Mr. Alexander has been with the Ca
nadian road commission for year.
The bride formerly taught school at
Haines.
For the present they will live in
Haines but it is possible that they may
remove to Juneau.
PORTUGUESE PREMIER RESIGNS
LISBON, Dec. 23. ? Senhor Leite,
premier of the Portuguese Cabinet
has resigned.
i 'Personal Mention;;
it 11 i it
L. N. Uhl, the electrical engineer,
who has been installing a wireless
plant at the Jualin mine, returned
from that place on the Georgia last
night
Ray Haasze, of the Alaska Supply
Company is a passenger bound for Se
attle on the Humboldt.
L. B. Adslt took passage on the
Humboldt for Ketchikan.
Hugh Ettinger, of New York, who
has been doing Southeastern Alaska,
went to Petersburg on the Humboldt.
R. Wahlgren came down from Ju
alin last night on the Humboldt.
L. E. Buell, the well known travel
ing man left for Seattle on the Hum
boldt.
Emmett Harris went to Ketchikan
on the Humboldt last night.
J. Worner and F. Williamson, U. S.
land surveyors have been transferred
to California and left for the South
on the Humboldt
William Merchant, of Burford's, has
gone for a visit with his people in
Walla Walla. He took passage on the
Humboldt last night.
John Steffjcn, who has been in the
employ of the Alaska-Gastineau Com
pany, will leave on the Northwest
ern, for Seattle enroute to Denver,
where he will spend a three months'
vacation.
NEW YEAR CALENDARS.
The Empire acknowledges the re
ceipt of handsome New Year calen
dars from the Juneau Liquor Com
pany and the New York Exchange.
1 French cluster raisins, candied aid
pressed ginger at the Sanitary Gro
cery. t.f.
New sugared figs, Dromadory dates,
i and maple sugar at the Sanitary Gro
? eery. t.f.
! ?
t Ladies wishing to make a selec
I tion of a pipe or box of cigars fo:
Christmas presents may 'phone theii
wants In to BURFORD'S and depend
c on prompt and efficient service.
1
* Hot chili beans all the time al
. Lockle McKinnon'j Mayflower. tf
Bryan Lauds Wilson; I
Republicans happy
NEW YORK, Dec. 23?The dinner
given to Governor-elect William Sul
zer nt the Metropolitan Club, Satur
day evening was largely attended,
among the prominent guests being
President-elect Wilson, William Jen
nings Bryan, Governor John A. Dlx,
besides numorous members of Con
gress.
In his address Colonel Bryan de
clared that Mr. Wilson was bettor
equipped for the- important duties of
the presidential office than any form
er executive. Continuing his lauda
tory remarks about Wilson Bryan Bald
that never in fifty years had a Dem
ocratlc president so held the good
will of the Republican party, for, said
Bryan, "one-half of the Republican par
ty is rejoicing because Wilson defeat
ed Taft and the other half is rejoic
ing because ho defeated Roosevelt.
President Taft was toasted by the
banquotors, and felicitous addresses
were made by Governor-elect Sulzer,
Governor Dix, Samuel Untemeyer and
others.
William Randolph Hearst and Chas.
P. Murphy were not present.
A thousand of tho women of New
York entertained Mrs. Woodrow Wil
son at a reception on Saturday eve
ning.
IN MITYLENE TURKISH
ARMY SURRENDERS
ATHENS, Dec. 23.?A dispatch to
tho Grecclan government says that
the Turkish army in Mitylcne has sur
rendered. The surrender is said to
have been unconditional.
BARNETTE ESCAPES
ON ALL INDICTMENTS
VALDEZ, Dec. 22.?Judge Lyons of
the district court, yesterday knocked
out scvon embezzlement indictments
against E. T. Barnette, the Fairbanks
banker, and the prosecution moved
the dismissal of the perjury charge,
which was done. m '
The embezzlemont charges were dis
missed on the ground that the money
which Barnette withdrew from his
bank prior to its failure was his own.
BIG RAILROAD
HEADS jNDICTED
NEW YOKK, 'Dec. f23? President
W. S. Mellon of the New York, New
Haven & Hartford railroad, and Pres
ident Chamberlain and Alfred W.
Smithcrs, chairman of the board of
directors of the Grand Trunk rail
way, have been Indicted by a federal
grand Jury for violating the Sherman
act.
IN COMMISSIONER'S COURT
Deputy Marshal Fels last night ar
rested N. Morano for giving liquor to
Indians. He was locked up pending
a hearing.
HARRY MALONE IMPROVING.
Harry Malone deputy district court
clerk who was taken ill last Friday
is reported this morning to be improv
ing.
See the new Goal Belt City spoon,
designed by Winter & Pond. tf.
Chinaware makes a suitable Christ
mas present, and is most useful. Cups
and saucers, bread and butter plates,
sugar and cream pitchers, steins, Jap
anese and home decorations. I. J.
Sharick's.
STEAMER IS WRECKED;
23 PERSONS DROWNED
ST. JOHNS. N. F., Dec. 23. ? The
British steamer Florence was wrockcd
near Heart's Content yesterday and
twenty-three of the crew were
drowned.
I I M II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 11
:: Marine Notes f
111111111111111
Northwestern due from Westward
II a. m. tomorrow.
Tho Georgia arrived from Skag
woy and way ports last night and
left for Sitka today noon.
The Mariposa is due tomorrow eve
ning from Seattle.
The Dolphin is due from the South
Thursday night.
The Yukon is scheduled to arrive
on Dec. 26
The Curacao sails from Seattle on
Dec. 26.
mr. bishop ill.
Mayo. Bishop is ill at home. Dur
ing the illness of Mr. Bishop Mr. Wil
- llama will act as foreman of the grand
' Jury.
I Advantage.
Knicker?Why did Subbubs plant
tobacco in his garden?
I Bocker?Said he might as well hav<
.. weeds ho could smoke.
CIVIL GOVERNMENT
EOR CANAL ZONE
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Doc. 22.?
In an adross delivered hero on Satur
day, President Taft said that one of
the objects of his present visit to
Panama waB to determine whether
the time is opportune to establish a
civil government in the Canal Zone.
The Canal Zone embraces a strip of
land ten miles wide across the isth
mus of Panama and it contains a num
ber of town, among them Cristobal,
the town at the Atlantic entrance to
the canal, and Balboa on the Pacific
side.
KEY WEST, Dec. 22. ? President
Taft sailed on the battleship Arkan
sas for Colon last night
HELEN GOULD'S
BIG PRESENT
NEW YORK, Dec. 23.?Helen Mil
ler Qould who will shortly be mar
ried to Finley J. Shepard, a St. Louis
railroad man, will receive a wedding
present from twenty-one thousand
men of the Atlantic fleet.
Mis? Gould for many years has
taken an active interest in the wel
fare of the enlisted men in the United
States navy and in railroad workers.
COMMERCIAL CAFE
TO OPEN CHRISTMAS DAY
The splendid new Lang range or
dered by Mr. Warren for the Commer
cial Cafe arrived Saturday night on
the Humboldt and was installed before
six o'clock last night.
All day yesterday the place where
the now dining palace is being creat
ed was thronged with visitors. War
ren and all of the hired help were
working like beavers to get the place
in condition for business.
The formal opening of the establish
ment will be at noon on Christmas
Day and an excellent table d' hote
dinner is being prepared for the oc
casion.
THE HANSEN FUNERAL
The funeral of the late Hans Han
sen was held Saturday afternoon from
the parlors of the C. W. Young Com
pany. Rev. Stevens officiating. Fol
lowing were the pall bearers: F. Wol
lai^J, N. B. Johnson, P. Tweit, L.
Lange, J. Nordale, John Erlckson.
Interment was In Evergreen ceme
tery. The many friends of deceased
will erect a stone monument at the
grave.
*
The "Mariposa" is bringing a large
shipment of fancy fruit and vegetables
for GOLDSTEINS, leave your order
now to be delivered on arrival Christ
mas morning. ***
THE VISION OF
WM. H. SEWARD.
Robert W. Jennings late candidate
for delegate to Congress on the Demo
cratlc ticket will speak at the Com
mercial Club banquet on Jan. 12.
Mr. Jennings has choBen as the
subject of his theme, "The Vision ol
William H. Seward." There Is sc
much opportunity for an interesting
talk on this topic that It will be c
great treat to have it handled as Mr
Jennings is capable of doing.
Every thing that will please a smok
or may be found at BURFORD'S.
When looking for Christmas gifts
keep your eye on R. P. Nelson's plac<
before buying elsewhere. t.l
Up to Date.
: Wlfe-^-Really, I haven't anything fi
to wear.
? Husband?You dress in the provali
ing style, nevertheless.
The Viceroy of India
Wounded by Bomb
DELHI, India, Dec. 23?Lord Har
dlngo, viceroy and governor general
of India, was wounded yesterday and
an attendant wub killed by a bomb
hurled from a housetop as he was en
tering the ancient capitol of India in
state yesterday.
The streets were lined with peo
ple to witness the viceroy's arrival
when suddenly the bomb struck the
street exploding near the carriage oc
cupied by the viceroy. He was
struck by a flying missile, but his
wound is not expected to be serious.
The attendant waa killed Instantly,
but there were no other fatalities.
The bomb Is believed to have been
thrown by a Mohammedan fanatic,
who escaped.
The British ministry last February
changed the capital of India from
Bombay to Delhi, known as the an
cient capital.
Tho war of the Balkan States
against Turkey has aroused a deep
feeling of resentment among the Mo
hammedans, who openly charge
Great Britain with favoring the Ene
mies of the Ottoman government.
COMBINATIONS MOLD UP THE PEOPLE
WASHINGTON, Dec. 23.?In his an
nual report Commissioner of Corpor
ations Conant discusses at length the
relations existing between railroads
and steamship lines.
The commissioner makes the un
qualified statement that the railroads
and the steamship companies have ef
fected combinations by which the for
mer control all the regular steamship
lines, fix the rates and thus destroy
competition between railroads and
steamship companies. These combin- ?
ations, he says, not only include the
points on tidewater reached by the
transcontinental railroads, but nearly
all other competitive points on both
coasts.
THEY WANT THE SEAL ACT AMENDED
WASHINGTON, Dec. 21?The gov
ernments of Japan and Great Brit
ain have sent urgent note to the
United -States government asking for
an amendment to pelagic sealing in
Alaska waters..
The British and Japanese govtrn
inents held that the present regula
tions and restrictions do not operate
fairly and they ask for certain modifi
cations.
It is the view of the Washington
administration, based upon the urgent
notes of the complaining govern
ments, that Congress should amend
the seal act so as to Insure fair treat
ments hold that the present reguia
ers.
[POLICE EIND
TWO SKELETONS
CHICAGO, Dec. 23?The Chicago
police, on Saturday arrested a man
named Clyde Stratton and seven
others In a North Side flat, on suspic
ion of having murdered Logue, the
jeweler, whose dead body was found
in his storo with seventeen knife
wounds in it.
In searching the flat where Strat
ton and the others were arrested two
skeletons were found.
THE YAQUI INDIANS
ARE ON WARPATH
DOUGLAS, Ariz., Dec. 23.?The Ya
quis are reported to have massacred
the population of San Marcial in the
state of Sonord. None but the bar
est particulars have been received
here.
EXPOSITION PLANS
ARE COMPLETED
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 23.?The
architects' final drawings for the
great Panama Pacific International
Exposition which will be held in this
city in 1915 have been completed and
are now on exhibition. The plans are
the most comprehensive yet made for
any exposition that has ever been
held in any country, and they com
bine the useful with the beautiful.
The work of construction will ac
tively begin early next spring.
BRINGING REID'S BODY
PORTSMOUTH, Dec. 23. ? The
British cruiser Natal sailed on Sat
urday for New York with the body
of the late American Ambassador
Whitelaw Reid.
The Best candy on the market is
Huyler's, at R. P. Nelson's Stationery
Store. t.f.
KELLY APPREHENDED
Anthony Kelly convicted Saturday
of selling liquor to Indians and out
, on bail was this morning taken into
( custody pending sentence.
[ SIX TRUE BILLS.
At four o'clock Saturday afternoon
the grand jury reported indictments
. (true bilis) charging the crime of giv
ing liquor to Indians against Geo.
Hemminger (Indian), Sam Jackson.
Indian), John Jackson (Indian), Har
, vey Williams. John Erwlck, HanB Mag
>, nusson. All of-the men were ar
raigncd at 10 o'clock this morning.
t HOLLYWOOD ART PRINTS, latesi
styles in PICTURE MOULDINGS
I- FRAMES, made-to-order at W. H
CASE.
BRYANS NAME
NOT MENTIONED
TRENTON, N. J., Dec. 23.?Presi
dent-elect Wilson had a three and one
half hours' conference on Saturday
afternoon with William Jenings Bry
an in Mr. Wilson's oiflce in this city.
After the conference} was over and
Mr. Bryan had left for New York,
Governor Wilson said that Mr. Bry
an's name had not been mentioned
in the discussion of cabinet places.
HICKEY IS FOUND
GUILTY OF MURDER
BUFFALO, N. Y., Dec. 23.?Thomas
F. Hlc'tey on trial here for the mur
der of six year-old Joseph Josephs was
found guilty of murder in the second
degree. Hickey murdered the boy
more than a year ago concealing his
body in a sewer.
LARGE HALIBUT SHIPMENT
Longshore Boss O. E. Head yester
day had his crew stowing in the hold
of the Humboldt 113 boxes of fresh
halibul totalling 56,500 pounds.
MEXICAN REBELS
KILL 250 FEDERALS
EL PASO, Tex., Dec. 23.?A dis
patch to the Herald fro Ascension,
Mexico, says that a force of two
hundred and fifty federal troops
which were garrisoning Ascension,
have been annihilated by the rebels,
who stormed the town, put the gar
rison to death and looted the stores,
offices and other buildings.
OLD TIMER RETURNS
TO THIS SECTION
J. G. Smith, an old timer of Ju
neau, Dawson and Nome, was in town
today from the South end of Douglas
island where he is doing development
work on mining property he owns
there. Mr. Smith first came to Ju
neau in 1891 in a sailing craft from
Seattle. "And i had never sailed a
vessel before," he said.
"When I left Seattle the people
thought that I was headed for the
North Pole, so far away did Juneau
appear in those days."
Watch R. P. Nelson's place especial
ly his show cases, when looking for
a Xmas gift. t.f.
I have a lot of beautiful gold mount
, ed fountain pens, of every make.
They make inexpensive, useful and
? beautiful Christmas gifts.
? E. Valentine's Jewelry Store, ..uneau.
Now is the lime to buy holly at
t GOLDSTEIN'S.
Finest line of Calabash pipes in
Alaska at BURFORD'S

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