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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 26, 1912, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Entered as second-class matter Nove nber 7. 1912 at the postofflce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Ore year, by mall $10.00
Six mouths, by malt 0 00
Per month, delivered 100
JUNEAU. ALASKA. DECEMBER 26. 1912.
JUNEAU, CHURCHES AND CIVILIZATION.
T UNEAU is a city of churches. This remark has been made
before in connection with this city. It is repeated here for
the sake of emphasis. There are many good people who
look upon Alaska as a barbarian land, without the pale of civ
ilization, not to mention religious influences. And yet there
is scarcely a hamlet in this wide domain that has not a church,
or at least religious services of some kind, some portion of the
year. All of the more substantial towns have churches of the
various denominations and all work together in harmony for
the common good.
Yesterday and on Christmas Eve the churches held ser
vices in keeping with the season; the children of the Sunday
Schools had entertainments, also in accord with the spirit of
Christmas. Such things are helpful?to the children, to the
grown-ups, to all the community, whether they be church-goers
or not. With these things go the spirit of brotherhood. It mat
ters not whether we subscribe to religious dogmas or not, it
must be admitted that the churches have carried to those who
need it, of every land, the best of our civilization.
The unthinking sometimes sneer at missionaries and de
ride their work, yet these are the men who have crossed the
turbulent frontiers and have shown more physical and moral
courage than the soldier in battle. It was a base columny when
it was said that English missionaries in Africa carried the Bible
in one hand and gave the natives rum with the other. All the
missionaries who have embarked in the work of civilization have
not been single-minded, but the work that has been accom
plished cannot be justly condemned because of the lapses or
greed of the few. The influence exerted by devoted men has al
ways been for the good of humanity. ?
With seven new House smelling committees added to the
present list there should be an odorous time about the purlieus
of the national capitol.
The Christmas celebration at the Native church was
among the best in Juneau, say those who attended it.
And your Uncle Woodrow may also be a "wet blanket" on
the hope and ambition of many a placeseeker.
There is little doubt that President Taft met with a warm
reception at Panama.
THE SENATE AND CONFIRMATIONS.
SENATOR GORE, of Oklahoma, seems to be the official watch
dog of the Democratic party. He is opposed?pointedly op
posed to confirming Republicans in office, even though they
have been appointed to the bench. After sixteen years of Re
publican rule and Democratic exile, he says, in substance, he
cannot see the propriety and advisability of nominating and
confirming a Republican judge, to a bench that is unanimously
Republican.
And the Senators have the last word. "Senatorial courtesy"
in the matter of the confirmation of nominations made by the
President, is a mighty weapon. It has dashed to the ground
the budding hopes of many an aspirant for office. And some
times worthy ones, whose only fault was that they were non
persona grata to some Senator or the friends of the Senator.
President Taft has many offices to fill between now and
March 4, next, and what course he may elect to pursue in view
of the conditions that have arisen will be interesting to note.
He knows that he faces a Senate, the majority of which is hos
tile to him, if we include the Progressives with the Democrats;
and the pressure upon him from without is strong. As many
offices as possible must be preserved to his party, he may reas
on, what though their stay therein may be brief. The burden of
their removal, or the propriety of their filling out the terms for
which they are appointed, may be passed on to the incoming
administration, along with the tariff and other measures.
Seattle merchants were stealing two ounces on each quart
of cranberries they sold until the sealer of weights and meas
ures made them sell the berry by the pound. Seattle is some
times satisfied with small pickings if the whole hog cannot
be had.
We are told that Caesar divided Gaul into three parts, but
the Balkan allies want to go Caesar one better, and divide Tur
key into four.
A TOPSY-TURVY CIVILIZATION.
NOTWITHSTANDING the demands of the Balkan States that
nearly the whole of Turkey be divided among them it is
scarcely probable that their wishes will be gratified, but
that they will get substantial slices is a forgone conclusion. The
prospect of a general European war growing out of the Balkan
embroglio is mere flubdub. For economic and social reasons
war among the great nations is now impossible. Amazing prog
ress is being made in arbitration and in treaties giving better
and better machinery for peaceful settlement of international
differences. These differences themsleves are being reduced to
trifles, mostly not worth a second thought on the part of civil
ized peoples.
In one respect our civilization is topsy-turvy. The domi
nant note of life is trade. Commerce brings the nations togeth
er. It induces mutual respect. As Benjamin Franklin observed
long ago, it hurts trade "to hit our customer on the head.
Yet the expenditures on behalf of suspicion and hatred are
growing as never before. In the United States today seventy
tHtH*W*tTTTTTTTTTTl ,
|
three percent of the national expenditures goes to one or an- 1
o'ther of the war accounts. In most of the European countries
the expenditures for civil purposes are relatively negligible,
while thousands of millions of dollars are chargeable each year
to the var accounts.
In this era nations fight by taking up one another's war
loans. In lulls of peace they build for one another the ^hips they
would be presently bombarding one another with| The financial
kings are iron men; the crowned but automatons. The former
look after commerce and armament alike. They play no fav
orites. Their business is to absorb and adjust the debts of na
tions. The house of Rothschild long ago succeeded the house
of Bonaparte as the arbiter of the fortunes of Europe.
There are so many "sure cures" for the many ills that flesh
is heir to that it is little wonder that so many die.
Why keep Don Castro out of the United States? It might
civilize him a bit to touch a few of the high places.
J I CHARICK
. !? J* JJSKS*
PREPARING FOR
BIG BUSINESS
Edward Morgan, traveling agent for
the Alaska Steamship Company, ar
rived up ou the Mariposa and will
spend a few days In Juneau.
Mr. Morgan is in a very optimistic
frame of mind. He Bays things look
mighty good around here and that
people on the Outside are taking heart
over the prospect of remedied legisla
tion for Alaska from the new admin
istration.
"Our company," he Baid, "is prepar
ing for the increased business sure
to result from the new order of things.
The Dolphin is to be replaced at once
by the Jefferson which will go on
a ten day schedule giving Juucau a
boat every five days In every direc
tion by our vessels. Still other
changes will be made in the spring,
increasing the efficiency of the ser
vice for Juneau."
A number of witnesses have been
summoned from Seward to appear In
the government coal caseB, at Chi
cago, against A. C. Frost, former
president of the Alaska Central rail
road. The men Bubpocnaed are: Geo.
Sexton, F. M. Hale, W. H. Whittle
sey, J. J. Fennegan, H. H. Hlldreth and
C. M. Hill. The case is set for Febru
ary 17. ,
The Prince Rupert Inn, the finest
hostolry in British Columbia, north
of Vauncoucer, was burned to the
ground a few dayB ago. A fireman
named Mclntoshs was badly injured
during the fire.
BIRTH AT HOSPITAL
A baby boy was born to Mrs. Card,
a native woman from Haines, at the
government hospital this morning.
Dr. Mahone was the attending phy
sician.
Winter & Pond have fresh holly. ???
The Japan current has caused a
20% discount on all Ladies FURS
until January 1st, at W. H. CASE.
Chili concarne served every night
at i/ockic McKinnon's, on Second
avenue. tf.
What could bo more appropriate
than a beautiful umbrella for Christ
mas? Valentine has them in count
less styles. ???
The Best candy on the market is ?
Huyler's, at R. P. Nelson's Stationery J >
Store. tf. J J
HOLLYWOOD ART PRINTS, latest <1
styles in PICTURE MOULDINGS.
FRAMES, made-to-order at W. H. < >
CASE. \ I
FEMMER & RITTER
See this firm for all kinds of dray- < J
[ lng and hauling. We guarantee sat.- < >
isfaction and reasonable prices. Coal < [
I delivered promptly. Femmer & Rit- < *
ter's Express. Stand Burford's Cor- < ?
ner. Phone 314. Residence phones < J
402 or 403. ??? J \
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS.
Any subscribers to The Daily Em- < *
pire not receiving papers regularly < >
either by carrier or mail, will confer J >
a favor by promptly notifying The * J
Empire office. 1 >
For Sale. <!
A $125.00 National cash register, JI
good as new, for sale, cheap. See J J
Denny Orfanos, Douglas. < >
LOST?A Greek letter Sigma Chi * |
fraternity pin, cross-shaped, enameled < >
front, gold base. Reward: H. E. o
Meyer, Surveyor-General office. Lf. * J*
Chlnaware makes a suitable Christ- >
mas present, and is most usefuL Cups >
and saucers, bread and butter plates, J
sugar and cream pitchers, steinB, Jap- >
anese and home decorations. I. J. >
Sharick's. ^
The Empire
for
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Pius
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
I Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
,
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshal!
ATT0RNEY8-AT-LAW 1
Decker Building
Juneau Alaika
H. P. CROWTHER
U. 8. Deputy Surveyor j
U. 8. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewie Block ? Juneau ?!
-i I
N. WATANABE
DENTI8T
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
? !_
The United States of America,
District of Alaska.
WHEREAS, on the 13th day of De
cember, 1912, B. B. Metz and F. M.
Flak filed a libel In the District Court
of the United States for the District
of Alaska, against the launch "Murre
lot" her boats, tackles, apparol and
furniture, in a cause of wages Civil
and Maritime.
AND WHEREAS, by virtue of pro
cess in due form of law, to me di
rected, returnable on the 13th day of
January, 1913, I have seized and tak
n tho said launch "Murrelet" and have
her in my custody.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
a District Court will be held in the
United States Court Room in the City
of Juneau, on the 13th day of January,
1913, for the trial of said premises,
and the owner or owners, and all per
sons who may have or claim any in
terest, are hereby cited to be and ap
peur at the time and place aforesaid,
to show cause, if any they have, why
a final decree should not pass as
prayed.
H. L. FAULKNER,
U. S. Marshal.
Shacklcford & Bayless, proctors for '
Ubellanta.
First date of publication Dec. 13,
last date, Jan. 1. 1913.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakoe, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 6, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22, 28, Fob. 3, 9, 15. 21, 27,
March 6, 11, 17. 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21, *
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leavos Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skngway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3. 9, 15, 21. 27, Dec. 3,
9. 15, 21, 27. Jan. 2, 8. 14, 20.
26, Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19, 25. March
3. 9, 16. 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NO WELL, MANAGER
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT I The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND ?.... JAN. 2
SOUTHBOUND JAN. 3
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ofiicc, 71G Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
H-H-I I 1 1 1 I I I 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 ) 1 1 11 1 I 1 I 1 11 I I I 1 1 I 1 1 H 1 I I 1 1 1 1 I I I
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- ??
BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY "
MARIPOSA Northbound . Dec. 23. Southbound Dec. 30 "
NORTHWESTERN Southbound Dec. 22 "
DOLPHIN Northbound ... Dec. 26. Southbound Dec. 27
Tlcketo to 3eattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through
tickets to San Francisco.
! ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. !!
fH11! -m 111 in n m m in in i i"M n m i m i m m i m 111
NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 30
Flrat Claca Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Claaa Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY A BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSON A CO., Douglas
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpnon, Prince Rupert, Swnnaon, Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY JAN. 2
Front and Seward St*. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE j. t. spickett. Aet
| ALASKA COAST CO. ;j
? For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? >
I Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU
! S. S. YUKON DEC. 27 I !
! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA \
\ connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports j '
? S. S. YUKON DEC. 13 ? -
Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? ?
For further Information apply to 1 1
S. H. Ewlng, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ? ?
I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau tor
DoukUk and
Treadwell
~*8700 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. ni.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread -
well for
Juneau
?8:25 a. m.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. rn.
Leaves
1 Douglas for j
Juneau
?8:30 a. m.
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. tn.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau dally |
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m. J
From Juneau lor
Sheep Creek
Saturday Night Only
llTOO p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
ginday Schoh:!" ? am." :i:. rxc,-,>{ tnp Iravin;: .1'innU at a. in. ?:? ?.nnM?-<l |
I..;, i.i,.; I I I I I I I i 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I 1 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 I I | I 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 I I II 1 I I I I I 1 I
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX |
r Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan
i[ COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME !!
I- FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA -?
"i-h-h ?mini i-1 ?i-i-m mm i'm m m i m m m 11 m n 11
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine, and Regal Gas Engine
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck, Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Arc
Home-Smoked
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
..... t ? V i ^
BOOTS AND SHOES. FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
V ,'i is ? ? ?

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