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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 27, 1912, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postoffice at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1379.
SUBSCRIPTION. RATES:
Q*e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail * r>-00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU. ALASKA. DECEMBER. 27. 1912.
ON THE EDGE OF THE BANANA BELT
SLOWLY, but none the less surely, it is being noised abroad
that Alaska is not a land of perpetual snow and ice. It is
beginning to dawn upon the inner consciousness of even peo- [
pie of the far and, of course, effete, East, that Alaska was ma- j
ligned when it was dubbed "Seward's ice-box." New York andj
the whole North Atlantic Coast have just shaken themselves j
loose from the grip of a blizzard. In the Middle West and North
west States the cold has been intense. But here in the Alaska
panhandle, as this'is written, the rain patters on the roof; the
grass, which on Christmas Day bore a light mantle of soft white,
is today green; there is no touch of the breath of rude Boreas
in the breeze; instead there is the balminess of the spring time
in lands where grasses spring, waters run and flowers blow with
the touch of April sunshine and showers.
From Nome and from Fairbanks, from the mainland and
islands to the westward, comes the same story of a climate and
climatic conditions that gain by comparison with regions that
are supposed to be blessed with a better climate than ours.
And yet some will tell you that this is the "Land that God I
forgot"?a cursed land unfit for civilized mankind. But these
do not know; they cannot, or will not, comprehend its grandeur,
its mangnificence, its mountains, although many be nameless,
and its rivers which may run, God knows where?but we started
out to say that with the record of the past three winters in mind,
perhaps the Japan Current has really slipped a cog.
TO THOSE WHO COMPLAIN OF "TRIBUTE"
THE total salmon pack of the entire Pacific Coast, in eluding
Alaska and the Columbia river, this year, is 5,904,354 cases.
Of this amount Alaska contributed 4,065,350 cases, and the
rest of the Pacific Coast 1,839.004 cases, or less than one third
of the salmon output. The figures are keenly interesting, as
showing the importance of the salmon industry?not to Alaska
?but to the other sections of the Pacific Coast. For, so far
as Alaska is concerned, there is only the glory of being the great
est salmon producing country of the world. But it is mere glory
and it must be so rated. The profits of the industry are not for
Alaskans. They go into the pockets of men and corporations in
Seattle, San Francisco, Portland, Ore.; Chicago, New York, ana
even British Columbia. Alaska is the Lazarus of the business
and gets .the crumbs that fall from the fishing business that
they monopolize.
The figures that are given above are accurate, having been
prepared by the secretary of the Association of Alaska Salmon
Packers, who, in his report to the association, complains of the
"tribute" that the salmon packer pays to the state and govern
ment. But, perhaps he should not be censured too severely.
Complaining because the rich cannery concerns have to pay
"tribute" to state and government, may be a part of his duties.
The foreign cannery corporation preys on a great natural
resource of Alaska, and then complains because a tax that is ad
mitted to be exceedingly small by every one, except the packers,
is levied on the product taken from Alaska waters by alien fish
ermen and canned by employes who are virtually peons. These
men come from San Francisco or Seattle, or elsewhere in the
spring, and draw no pay all the season, nor until they have re
turned to the place at which they embarked. There, they are
paid off, if the padrone, who farms out their labor, has left them
anything after the "store account" has been settled.
The time has passed when Alaska's valuable salmon fish
eries can be ruthlessly exploited by foreign corporations, and
a beggarly pittance given in return for the "privilege."
The fisheries of Alaska belong to the people of Alaska?
and with canneries owned and operated by Alaskans we have no
quarrel. But we protest against the methods of the outside
canners who would delude the ignorant and uninformed by
complaining of the "tribute" that is wrung from these poor,
helpless, meticulous men, but who despite it have waxed rich
upon Alaska salmon.
Their cry of "tribujke" will not save them from the operation
of just and efficient laws by which Alaska shall obtain a fair
profit from a great natural product.
NEWSPAPERS AND TRUTH-TELLING.
tcy HERE are newspapers," said Joseph Pulitzer, "which cyn
1 ically avow their motto to be, 'Facts merely embarass
us,'" and the great newspaper man added, "but you can
pretty well count all of them in this country on the fingers of
your two hands. They are evanescent. Any institution that
flourishes on an appeal to morbidness by the aid of mendacity
can have but a precarious hold upon prosperity or even upon life
itself."
Anyone who knows his newspaper history will not ques
tion the fact that striving for accuracy is steadily growing
keener and more widespread. For every four dollars that a
responsible newspaper spends on originally getting a piece of
news it spends six dollars in verifying it; and it is safe to as
sert than in any important story, where the facts are available,
from a national convention to a murder trial or a football game,
such newspapers are extraordinarily accurate. To these, news
paper work is a trust, not a trade.
"Truth-telling," to again quote Mr. Pulitzer, "is the sole
reason for the existence of the press, and every time a newspa
per prints a mistake, it is performing an abnormal function:
every time it prints a deliberate fake it becomes a degenerate
and perverted monstrosity."
A LITERACY TEST FOR IMMIGRANTS.
WE READ that Congress is closely dividing over a bill to
apply the reading and writing test to immigrants. The
enforcement of the immigration laws is in charge of-the
Department of Commerce and Labor. But the annual report of
UCHARICK
. i J JEWELER
? and OPTICIAN <
I 1 I I I I t I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I ? I I 1
Secretary of Commerce and Labor Nagel makes no mention of I
the literacy test as a great saving factor against undesirable
incomers. The most desirable immigration we have seems to
be that which in many States is taking up their negiected farms;
but literacy is no test of this. The most undesirable is that
which in undue proportion peoples our charitable and reforma
tory institutions, but literacy is again no test and would provide
no certain remedy.
We shall find a better remedy in the closer enforcement of
existing laws against the admission of the diseased, the defect
ive, the lawbreaker and those likely to become a public charge,
under which last year, according to a recent dispatch, 2,456 were
deported and 16,057 were turned away at the gates of entry.
Literary tests can prove nothing of a civic value in a nation ded
icated to the work of providing larger opportunity for the poor
and ignorant and oppressed of the world.
ADVERTISED LETTERS
t
?
List of letters remaining unclaimed '
in the postofflce at Juneau, AlaBka,
for the week ending Dec. 21, 1912.
Parties calling for them should ask
for "advertised" mail and give date
of list 1
Ira Aldrlch.
Iver Carlson.
Knut Erickson.
W. Lay ton.
Peter Obrini.
Joe Oinuma.
Andrew Pedersen. ,
Mrs. John Salsberg. (card) 1
Karl Snthcr. (
Matt Soderland.
Miss Vernia Spaulding. (card)
E. L. HUNTER, P. M. i
THE FISHING FLEET. >
Rolfe?Sailed Dec. 26. ]
Kennebec?Ar. Dec. 19.
Dora H.?Sailed Dec. 26. j
Pacific?Out. # <
Mildred.?No. 1.?Out.
Mildred.?No. 2.?Out 1
Active.?Out.
Olga?Ar. Dec. 26. j
Belle?Sailed Dec. 11. I
Highland Queen?Ar. Dec. 21.
Louise?Sailed Dec 27. '
Norman Sunde?Sailed Dec. 27.
Volunteer.?Out.
Vesta?On beach
Valkyrie?Out. ;
Xhanthus?Sailed Dec. 19.
Waif?Sailed Dec. 9 .
WhiteStai?Sailed Dec. 12.
Lister?Sailed Dec. 26.
Olympic?Sailed Dec. 10.
Dick?Laid Up.
Dolphin?Ar. Dec. 21.
Halley's?Out.
Alameda?Out
Annie?Ar. Dec. 22.
Uranus?Out
Pollux?Ar. Dec. 10.
Cedrlc?Out.
Thelma?Ar. Dec. 23.
Alvlda?Sailed Doc. 14.
Comet?Sailed Dec. 21.
Anita Phillips?Sailed Doc. 27.
Solkol.?Ar. Dec. 25.
The finest sight in town is my beau
tiful stock of cut gloss. Here is
where quality counts. Valentine's
Store at Juneau has the latest, new
est and most beautiful designs, some
thing you never saw before. ???
Whatever your needs, come in and
let me show you a variety of beau
tiful presents that will at once ap
peal to you as "Just the thing." Val
entine's Store has genuine new at- ,
tractions for Christmas. ???
High grade cut glass that will please
particular people; water, wine and ;
whiskey sets; beer bowls, sugar and
creams, footed comforts, oil and vine
gar bottles, cigar and tobacco Jars. [
I. J. Sharick has the best lines of
goods suitable for Christmas. Call
and make selections while the stock [
Is fulL
The newest and best, the original !
idea and the modern thought in |
Christmas goods Is seen everywhere <
in Valentino's bright, fresh stock of !
Jewelry, silverware, cut glass, and ]
every other thing that you may de- ?
sire for presentation. ??? !
' I <
Ladles wishing to make a selec
tion of a pipe or box of cigars for
Christmas presents may 'phono their
wants in to BURFORD'S and depend
on prompt and efficient service.
To Juneau patrons:
I wish to announce that I am pre
pared to give prompt and efficient
service in delivering, coal hauling
freight, baggage, etc.
HILARY McKANNA TRANSFER
Phone Order 5-7 or 55 tf
If quantity and quality are what you
want; you should see Valentine's cut
glass' before making your purchases.
Many new and beautiful designs aro <
displayed, not heretofore seen In 4
Alaska. ??? <
I have a lot of beautiful gold mount
ed fountain pens, of every make.
They make Inexpensive, useful and
icautiful Christmas gifts.
3. Valentine's Jewelry Store, Juneau.
Christmas flowers?carnation, holly,
riolets, chrysanthemums?at the Win
:er & Pond Store. Place your order
low. t.f.
The United States of America,
District of Alaska.
WHEREAS, on the 13th day of De
:ember( 1912, B. B. Motz and F\ M.
"Isk tiled a libel in the District Court
>f the United States for the District
)f Alaska, against the launch "Murre
et" her boats, tackles, apparel and
.'urnlture, in a cause of wages Civil
ind Maritime.
AND WHEREAS, by virtue of pro
:ess In due form of law, to me dl
?ected, returnable on the 13th day of
January, 1913, I have seized and tak
n the said launch "Murrelet" and have
ler in my custody.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
i District Court will be held in the
United States Court Room In the City
if Juneau, on the 13th day of January,
1913, for tho trial of said premises,
ind tho owner or owners, and all per
sons who may have or claim any In
lerest, nre hereby cited to be and ap
pear at the time and place aforesaid,
lo show cause, if any they have, why
t final decree Bhould not pass as
i rayed.
H. L. FAULKNER.
U. S. Marshal.
Shackleford & Baylcss, proctors for
libellants. -
First date of publication Dec. 13,
last date, Jan. 1. 1913.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonata, Gypsum,
Tenakeo, Kllllsnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 6, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23. 29. Jan. 4, 10,
16. 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9. 16, 21, 27,
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Doc. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. in.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Covo, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualln, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15. 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9. 15. 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9. 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaveB Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NO WELL, MANAGER
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
Lewi* Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW =
Lewi* Building, Juneau |?*
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW !!
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. 8. Deputy 8urveyor 'j
U. 8. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ?Juneau +
? I
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
The Empire
for
d
Job Printing i
Good Stock
Plus
H
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Plone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer S. HUMBOLDT I The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND JAN. 2
80UTHB0UND JAN. 3.
D0CK8 AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Olllcc, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
M ! 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 M 1 I 1 1 11 1 I I I 1 M 1 1 111 1 111 I i 11 1 1 1 1 1 11 111 MH
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- ??
BURG. DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY !!
MARIPOSA Northbound . Dec. 23. Southbound Dec. 30
NORTHWESTERN Southbound Dec. 22 "
DOLPHIN Northbound ... Dec. 26. Southbound ......Dec. 27 jj
Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouve-. Through
tickets to San Francisco.
ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. "
-H-H-i-H' I 1 Mil T I 1-1- M III III 111 I III 1 III 111 I 1 I 111 III I I M
NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 30
First Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle ? - - ...... $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattlo.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSON A CO., Douglas
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CMStService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prlnco Rupert, Swanson, Alert Bay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY JAN. 2
Front and Seward Sta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICKETT. Agt.
; u n m i n 1111 n i u 1111111111 n i n 111 ii 1111111111111
| ALASKA COAST CO. ii
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ? ?
I Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
! S. S. YUKON DEC. 27 ! !
! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA "
) connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California port# j J
; S. S. YUKON DEC. 13 ? J
Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? ?
For further Information apply to
; S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ;?
i ? n i n 111 e i 11111111111111111111111111111111111?1111
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE I
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be- I
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK . I
Lv. Juneau for
Douiclan and
Trend well
"*8:00a.m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a.m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. ra.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trcad
wcll for
Juneau
*8:25 a. m.
9 :25 a. m.
12:09 noon
1:10 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. ra.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Lea vcti
Douglas for
Juneau
?8:30 a. m.
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p. in.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau dally
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
6:10 p. m.
From Jun<*u for
Shwp Crook
Saturday Night Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule mime as obove, except trip leaving Juneau at 8 a. m. la omitted j
I-l-I-H-M MM I i-I-1-1 I I I -I II I I 'H ?H-H'Wl J-l-l-l-l-l-I I I M 1 I 111 1 1 I 1
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX |
! Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan "
I COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME "
I FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA "
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents (Jnlon Gas Engino and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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