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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 04, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Kntered as second-class matter November 7, 11*1 ? at the postolllce at Ju
neau, Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
O^e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 5,()0
Per month, delivered * ^
JUNEAU. ALASKA. SATURDAY, JANUARY 4. 1913.
SPEAKING OF GRAND JURY REPORTS.
THE final presentment of the grand jury to the court, which
was made yesterday afternoon, is as mild-mannered a re
port as ever emanated from a grand jury room. It neither
views with alarm nor points with a pride that is particular to
anybody or anything. Its recommendations are confined to two
items, neither of startling importance. This beiug the case we
do not know whether the grand jury or the people are to be most
congratulated.
We have been accustomed in times past to read grand jury
reports that covered nearly every subject that was supposed to
be of interest to the body politic. These reports have con
demned things animate and inanimate; have explored the
heavens above, the earth beneath and the waters under the
earth in endeavor to make crooked paths straight. But the Ju
neau grand jury's report is a marvel of simplicity and brevity.
We commend it. It is worthy of emulation elsewhere, because
the time-honored preachments presented with statutory regu
larity are almost infallible as non-producers of tangible results.
And the frisking of rhetoric to pr >duce a report that would
scintillate with wisdom, if not wit has been almost invariably
wasted.
There are exceptions, of course, but, largely, they prove
the rule. Contrast the succinct Juneau production with that
which recently bourgeoned into being at Valdez. The Glacier
City grand inquisitorial body began with suggesting the appoint
ment of a game warden, and ended with a recommendation that
a law "be passed making it a felony for a notary public to im
peach the signature of those who presumably have made affida
vit before him"?that is, that the act must be one of fact and
not of accommodation. This grand jury evidently had in mind
the absent treatment that Fairbanks notary public gave the
indicted bank officials when he subscribed his name and affixed
his official seal to divers and sundry affidavits relating to the
banks' affairs. And who shall say that the grand jury was not
justified in taking cognizance of a flagrant lapse of this kind.
And herein lies an argument in favor of a grand jury's inves
tigation of public affairs. If, in itself, it is of little worth, if the
recommendations be sound they are sure to receive publicity and
thus attain, in a measure, at least, the end sought.
Secretary Nagel must have given Cipriano Castro the third
degree?or perhaps he applied the literacy test
It is a sign of progress that editors don't break into jail as
frequently as formerly?Idaho editors excepted.
WHERE NOBODY WAS TO BLAME.
THE newspapers of Alaska have printed more or less matter
connected with the trial of the Washington-Alaska bank cases
at Valdez. At least one Seattle newspaper had a special
writer covering the cases, and the bank officials did not get the
worst of it. Other Alaska newspapers have told us of the "per
secution." of good, honest, upright gentlemen, who through no
fault of their own got tangled up in the labyrinthine meshes of
laws not made for such excellent men; that these men were,
instead, so to speak, the creatures of a concatenation of cruel
circumstances over which they had no control, and, therefore,
are entitled to the molly-coddling sympathies of the dear pub
lic, who can never really know the anguish of mind, the carking
care that creased their brows, because they were haled into
court to be tried for high crims and misdemeanors!
We, of course, assume that all of these honorable gentlemen
were innocent?all except one and he was guilty only of a little
misdemeanor, valued at one thousand dollars in cash, which
the veracious reports tell us was paid with glad acclaim, or
words to that effect. Incidentally the government's cash re
ceipts were swollen to that extent.
And all the while that the newspaper and other claques
have been extolling the virtues, the ability, the heroism of these
gentlemen, so unjustly, so unnecessarily and so needlessly "per
secuted," we have failed to catch even the faintest whisper about
the poor depositors of the busted bank, who lost their all. That,
of course, may have been a mere oversight on the part of the
friends of the good bank officials. The depositors lost their mon
ey, but they should not squeal. Was it not the act of honorable
men? Nobody was to blame; nothing was to blame, for has not
the operation of the law so declared? Nobody to blame but the
poor, gullible, deluded men and women who trusted the bank
and relied upon the integrity, the honesty and uprightness of
the accredited management!
Yet the Washington-Alaska bank of Fairbanks, failed owing
its depositors $921,357.56, but of this $460,678.78 has been paid
to them. And it is estimated that the bank has uncollectable
notes for $141,000. But nobody can be blamed?not even the
men who touched the bank through the medium of worthless
notes of hand.
It ought to be a matter of joy and pride to the gentlemen
that their escutcheons have been so brightly burnished and now
they can go forth without spot or wrinkle among a wicked and
gainsaying people?but what of the depositors? Fudge! No
body was to blame.
That New York man with the Henry Clay lock will have to
go some if he ousts Murphy from Tammany hall.
INSULTING A STOCK-EXCHANGE.
ALL the stock exchanges of Italy were closed for two days
recently. The members took this means of showing their
anguish because the Italian premier had spoken unkind
ly of them in passing a biil increasing the bond to $20,000.
Of course that is the "Latin temperament" on 'Change. The
I CHARICK
I.J. J jssa..
41 I 1 I I Il? 3 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
sturdy Anglo-Saxon way of our own Napoleons of Finance is
how different!
Did not President-elect Wilson threaten to hang on a gib
of shame, as high as Hainan's, any stock-jobbers who should do
certain things? Yet 110 Exchange was closed. Brokers contin
ued to hypothecate their customers' securities. Banks continued
to over-certify checks under the convenient device of a daily re
newed note of hand. Manipulators continued to buy and seU the
same stocks at the same time. Business went on without any $20,
000 bond, or any usury law, responsibility or limit lower than
the blue sky.
After all, why should any broker, in Genoa or New York,
stop chasing "eighths" because a statesman tells the truth
about stock-jobbing? Better be a practical man?and let the
jingling of the dollar heal the hurt that honor feels.
If you would know what is the matter with Alaska, listen
to the jingle of Seattle words. Or should we say the matter with
Seattle?
Mexico may be able to protect Americans, but we would like
to have more tangible evidence than mere assertion. Quien
Sabe?
There is no doubt that Senator Joe Bailey's swan song was
an eloquent one.
The "recall" seems to have got in its work on California
State Senator.
IMMIGRANT HAS $49,800 i
BALTIMORE, Jan. 3?To the great j
surprise of the immigration officials
here yesterday, Christian Schulzle, of
Russia, an immigrant on the steamer
Barbarossn from Bremen, when asked
to name the amount of money he had
on his person drew out of his var
ious pockets $7,000 in cash, a check
for $2,800 and $40,000 in securities.
As he laid the bank notes and cash
on a table the officers smiled and ex
pressed their astonishment that he
should carry so fuch wealth in his
clothes. He said he was a farmer and
was on his way to the home of his
daughter, Mrs. Frederick Kepperle of
Eureka, S. Dakota. His wife and six
children accompanied him. They will,
settle in N. Dakota.
HER SHOPPING TOUR
COST A MILLION
LOS ANGELES. Jan. 4? Mrs. Clara
Baldwin Stocker, one of the two heirs
of the estate left by "Lucky" Baldwin,
has arrived at her Arcadia home from
Chicago, bringing the first instalment
of her $1,000,000 purchases, in accord
ance with her expressed intention to
[ "spend a million or two in order to
i have a really good time."
Included in the $1,000,000 expendit
ures just made by Mrs. Stocker are a
$200,000 steam yacht, diamonds to
the value of $250,000, a wardrobe,
costing $100,000, silverware, $20,0001
automobiles, $20,000; new residence
at Arcadia, $60,000; ocean front res
idence at Venice, $30,000, and many
art ipeces.
She has already received approxi
mately $1,500,000 from her father's
estate, and will soon receive half of
the remaining $24,000,000.
THE FISHING FLEET.
Rolfe?Sailed Dec. 26.
Kennebec?Ar. Jan. 1
Dora H.?Sailed Dec. 26.
Pacific?Out.
Mildred.?No. 1.?Out.
Mildred.?No. 2.?Out.
Active.?Out.
Olga?Sailed Dec. 28.
Belle?Sailed Dec. 11.
Highland Queen?Sailed Dec. 28.
Louise?Sailed Dec 27.
Norman Sunde?In port
Volunteer.?Out.
Vesta?In port.
Valkyrie?Out.
Xhanthus?Sailed, Dec. 19.
Waif?Sailed Dec. 9 .
White Star?In port.
Lister?Sailed Dec. 26.
Olympic?Sailed Doc. 10.
Dick?Laid Up.
Dolphin?Ar. Dec. 21.
Halley's?Out.
Alameda?Out.
Annie?Sailed Dec. 30.
Uranus?Out
Pollux?In port.
Cedric?Out.
Thelma?Ar. Dec. 23.
Alvida?Sailed Dec. 14.
Comet?Sailed Dec. 21.
Anita Phillips?In port
Solkol?Sailed Dec. 30.
Standard?Ar. Jan. 3.
Gjoa?Ar. Dec.. 29.
Diamonds, always a wise invest
ment, are unusually so at this time.
Ours are imported under auspices so
favorable as to enable us to offer
you better values thaD we believe
you'll obtain elsewhere. ???
L J. SHARRICK.
To Juneau patrons ?
I wish to announce that I am pr<#
pared to give prompt and efficient
service in delivering, coal hauling
rreight., baggage, etc.
HILARY McKANNA TRANSFER
Phone Order 5-7 or 55 tf
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17. 23. 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17. 23, 29, Jan. 4. 10.
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5. 11, 17. 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4. 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec*. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor.
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9. 15, 21, 27. Dec. 3,
9, 15, 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9. 15. 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
Lev/Is Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
?
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTO R N E YS-AT-L A W
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. 3. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
?????????
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
The Empire
for
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. j
The Alaska Flyer HUMBOLDT The Alaska Flyer J
NORTHBOUND JAN. 2
SOUTHBOUND JAN. 3
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ofllce, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD. ABont
1 I 1 I 1 1 -I 1 I ! I I I I I I I IM-H-H-H-H-I-I-l I I l rrr
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- ??
I BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND 8KAGWAY $
;; MARIPOSA Northbound . Dec. 23. Southbound Dec. 30 V
;; NORTHWESTERN Southbound Dec. 22 T
;; DOLPHIN Northbound ... Dec. 26. Southbound Dec. 27 T
!! Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through T.
;* tickets to San Francisco. T
!! ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agf I
. i i i?i..h-h-I.'M ?!??!? M-H I 1 M 1 1 M I I 1 I i M-H IMI M-H--H
I NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY j
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, DEC. 30
First Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSON <?/ CO., Douglas |
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.~B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for I'ort Simpaon. Prince Rupert. Swanaon, Alert Hay. Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY JAN. 2
Front and Seward Sta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE .T. SPICKETT. A*t.
IlllltllllllllUilllltUI |>| I I II I I II I I 1 I I
ii ALASKA COAST CO. ::
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, . ?
!! Scldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU
!! S. S. YUKON DEC. 27 ii
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA !!
| J connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports jj
| ; S. S. YUKON .... JAN. 15 ' ?
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ?
; ?' For further information apply to
;; S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ;
-H-H II I H4 I II I H I I I 8 1 IIW I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I H I
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Douglax and
Treadwcll
?8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m. I
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
I.v. Tr-a.l
woll for
Juneau
*S:25 a. m. I
9:25 a. m. j
12:00 noon
; 1:40 p.m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
[ 8:25 p. in.
9:25 p.m.
11: jr. p. m.
Leaven
DoukIun for
Juneau
?8:30 a. in. j
9:30 a.m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m.
5:30 p.m. |
7:05 p. m. ]
8:30 p.m. !
9:30 p.m. "
11 :30 j>. m. |!
Ixsivca Junoau daily
for Sheep Crcok
11:00 a. m. [
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Ni?ht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. in.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. in.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
Sunday Schedule same as above, except trip leaving Jijn
?H-H-H ?! M 1 I 1 M M I-I- Mi !? H 1- III M 111 I III 111 III 1 H 1-H-H
j OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX f
Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan
;; COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME !!
" FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA J
-I-I I I 1 -I 1 M M I I 1 I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 1 I 1 I I I I I I 1 I 1 I I I Mil M 1'
UNION IRON WORKS *Iachine sh?p and Fourdr-v
i
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are1 j Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA -TREADWCLL GOLD MINING CO.

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