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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 09, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-1
Entered an second-class matter November 7, 1S12 at the postolllce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Qye year, by mall $10.00
Sis months, by mall 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU, ALASKA. THURSDAY. JANUARY 9, 1913.
THE GOVERNMENTS TRIAL OF A CORPSE.
THE dispatches tell us that the Government is about to begin
proceedings to test the validity of the location of the Mc
Donald coal claims, on Bering lake. These claims furnish
an interesting example of the way in which the Government of
the United States has strangled the development of Alaska coal
lands. Mr. T. P .McDonald, a Montana coal operator acquired
three coal claims, through purchase from the original locators
in 1906. and early the following year began their development
in a workmanlike and comprehensive manner. During the year
1907 and a few months of 1908 he expended in development
work a sum upwards of $100,000. when the Department of the
Interior notified him to quit work. He obeyed instructions, and
;Vthough he was just about ready to mine coal for commercial
purposes, and had closed contracts for several thousand tons of
his product, he was forced to abandon the mine It is needless
to say that it has remained closed ever since, and the develop
? ? ~ i ? 11 . l
ment work that was done is, or course, now pracucaiiy useless,
should the mine at any time hereafter be again opened up.
Mr. McDonald purchased the claims in good faith, from
the original locators, whose title under the law was good, and
whose locations were bona fide. Mr. McDonald was not the
agent of any corporation, nor was any corporation interested
with him directly or remotely. The money that was spent in
the endeavor to open up an Alaska coal mine was largely his
own, the remainder having been furnished by a few personal
friends.
The Government of the I'nited States first ruined him fi
nancially. by placing an embargo upon him by refusing him a
permit to mine the coal he had developed: and now more
than four years later the same Government has decided to test
the validity of these coal locations. It is on a par with robbing
a man of his all and then sandbagging him because he had not
more: or to be more explicit, it is like killing a man first for
an alleged crime and then trying the corpse to see if a mistake
had been made.
It is difficult to refer to the gross crassness of the Govern
ment's policy toward Alaska in the matter of its coal resources
without resorting to the strongest animadversions, because mere j
criticism is wholly inadequate to meet the exigencies of a situ
ation that has been forced upon a young and struggling territory.
The question of a transportation employee's "right to get
drunk" when off duty is agitating England. The sentence to
one year's imprisonment of a New York chauffeur convicted of
recklessly driving his car while under the influence of liquor es
tablishes an excellent precedent for dealing with employees
whose occupation concerns public safety who get drunk while
on duty.
And now the House Merchant Marine Committee has be
gun to probe the alleged existence of a steamship trust. This
may give the railroads breathing space.
THE SILENCE OF THE "MONEY TRUST."
WHEN J. Pierpont Morgan recently appeared before the Con
gressional Committee investigating the alleged money
trust, he was valuable to a degree, as soon as a temporary
diffidence had passed. And while the committee had ample evi
dence of the powers of speech possessed by Mr. Morgan, the
sum total of his remarks shed but little additional light on the
subject under inquiry. The New York financier was something
more than an adipose bundle of mere negations; he was posi
tive at all times, ever insistent that a money trust was but the
phantasy of an idle dream. And he left the committee room sat
isfied, and as smug as cold molasses. Neither the investigators
nor the world at large received much information of real value
from Mr. Morgan, apart from the fact that he illustrated defi
nitely what was well known before?that in the varied intrica
cies of finance his is a master mind.
tor several months William Rockefeller evaded the process
servers, who, armed with subpoenas, desired to meet him on
behalf of the Committee of Congress. Finally, through his at
torneys. he accepted service of the summons But now comes
the news that Mr. Rockefeller has no power of speech, and that
were he to give oral testimony before the committee strangula
tion might result at a consequence.
Chairman Pujo of the committee seems to be a sort of doubt
ing Thomas, and has announced that the unwilling witness must
be examined by a competent physician before he will consent to
Mr. Rockefeller submitting his remarks in typewritten copy.
Whether Mr. Rockefeller's physical condition is such as is
claimed is a matter of only passing interest. That which seems
to have created doubt and distrust of the men who are supposed
to control the alleged money trust, is their very evident reluct
ance to tell the whole truth. Ifthere were nothing to conceal
why this attitude in a matter that is considered of vital inter
est to the people of the United States.
The Oregon coast annually reaps its tale of human life. The
wreck of the oil tanker Rosecrans and the loss of thirty-three
lives adds to the gruesome list.
THE SEARCH FOR THE "MISSING LINK."
CHARLES DARWIN took up the old theory of man's descent
from the higher apes and gave it standing as the modern
doctrine of evolution, and science has ever since been seek
ing the missing link between the highest ape and the lowest
man. It is still missing although it has been several times "dis
covered." There was the "Sussex skull." found in England; and
the Pithecanthropus, as the missing link, was providently named ,
in advance of his discovery. He has now been reconstructed by i
German scientists. He was, if he ever existed, a low-browed,
hairy fellow, with thick lips, long, sinewy arms, and short,
bowed legs. His foot had straightened out, his big toe no longer
served as a thumb like the ape's and he lived on the ground.
Knowing what they sought, the scientists have had several
disheartening false alarms. The Neanderthal man, discovered
fifty-six years ago, was fully human though primitive. The
Java man found in 1891 was too advanced for a missing link. The
lady who originally owned the Sussex skull could speak and use
tools, and her brain was as good as that of a Tasmanian of to
day. No ape has much more than half her brain.
With the possible exception of the Java man, whose bones
are too incomplete for the scientists to agree about him fully,
no human skeleton was ever unearthed of a type so low that il
cannot be matched among living men; nor has any trace ever
been found of ape remains higher in type than existing apes.
The cave man and the stone-age man still exist. The ape-man is
still to find.
Husbands desiring to retain a wife's affections are advised
by a Boston feminine authority in domestic happiness to "call
her 'dear* once in a while." Yet in New York a wife has caused
her husband's arrest for his too frequent use of "dearie" in ad
dressing her. The "rule of reason," of course, has to be con
sidered in domestic precepts as well as in Federal laws.
Congress should pass that $125,000 appropriation for a
lighthouse at Cape St. Elias. A lighthouse there has been need
ed for years. It will be needed more and more in the years to
come, with the development of the Westward country.
AEROPLANES MEET
IN MIDAIR.
PARIS. Jan. 7.?An aeroplane col
lission in midair today imperilled the
life of the son of Theophile Delcasse.
.Minister of .Marine, and two aviators
at Villacoublay, near Paris.
Young Delcasse was a passenger on
board a monoplane piloted by George
Collardeau. Another machine ascend
ed. and the two aeroplanes started ina
neuvring around the aerodrome. The
false movement of a lever caused them
to come into collision, and the two
.wrecked machines interlocked and
crashed to the earth.
One of youn Delcasse's legs was
fractured and Collardeau was badly |
bruised, while the pilot of the other
aeroplane was probably fatally in
jured.
I
Gi.lMPSE AT THE PAST.
"I hear," remarked the Queen of
Sheba, as she greeted Solomon, "you
have just married your 1.400th wife.",
"Reports concerning my marriage, j
Your Majesty," pleasantly answered
King Solomon, "are greatly exagger
ated."
From which we seem to learn where
Mark Twain got the idea.
RAPID-TRANSIT NOTE.
One girl tried to argue with us the
other day that we should not object
to having the back of our neck tick
It d with a $15 feather.?Toledo Blade.
A PRESENT.
He?What are you going to give
Kitty and Jack for a weding present?
She?Oh, I guess I'll send Kitty the
bunch of letters Jack wrote me when
we were engaged.
POINTED PARAGRAPHS
A scientist has discovered that the
onion is a cure for love.
Public enthusiasm is often succeed
ed by public forgetfulness.
When a man develops into a growl
er it's time to rush him.
It's easier to persuade a man to
to stand alone than it Is to induce
him to stand a loan.
It's a safe bet that most of your
friends are people who want you to
work for them without pay.
Of course, love is blind, but it
might be just as well to remember
that the eyesight of the neighbors is
good.
The successful man strikes while
the iron is hot, but there are others
who fail to recognize hot iron when
they see it.
No doubt a prophet would have
more honor in his own country if the
natives didn't get tired of hearing
him say, "I told you so."
A hint to advertisers?all that glit
ters isn't sold.
Many a man has reached the heights
by putting up a bluff.
Every man is taken at his face val
ue in the barber shop.
The fact that talk is cheap is what T
makes it so expensive in the end. ?
A woman Is apt to cultivute the X
latest wrinkle, unless it happens to X
come in her face. T
Some girls go through a marriage ?
ceremony as though they had been X
used to it all their lives. *
? w A
"100 PER CENT
BANK" IS CLOSED
CHICAGO, Jan. 9.?A private bank
which advertised to pay 100 per cent
interest a year "on all deposits, from
one cent to $15,000,000,000," was closed
today with the arrest of P. It. Carson,
its promoter, on a charge of using
the mails to defraud. Circulars were
sent to principals of schools through
out the country asking for deposits.
Carson is said to have obtained
many thousands of dollars.
The first poinsettas ever shipped to
Alaska are on display in the show
window of the WINTER & POND
Store.
Every thing that will please a smok
er may be found at BURFORD'S.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah. Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23. 29,
Dee. 5. 11, 17. 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22. 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5, 11. 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17.
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3. 9, 15. 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15, 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20,
26, Feb. 1. 7. 13, 19, 25, March
15, 21. 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
J I I CHARICK
, I.J. J.??,
r
I l I l I I l I I II I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I l-H
Professional Cards
| ? f 1 ?
R. W. JENNINGS
I ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
| Tine Empire
for
job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
aaaaaaaaaaaaaa
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Atoka Flyer S. HUMBOLDT Tho Aluxka Fly.-r
NORTHBOUND JAN. 12
SOUTHBOUND JAN. 13
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ofllcc, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, Agent
1 l l H I I I 1 ITT
t ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO. f
i:\MI. CS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- |
J BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY I
;i; NORTHWESTERN Southbound Jan. 11 T
t MARIPOSA Northbound Southbound Dec. 22 jj;
DOLPHIN Northbound Jan. 8 Southbound Jan. y V
*V j
X Tickets to Seattle. Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through J.
tickets to San Francisco. V
1 El.MEG E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. W.'LLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. lj"
J NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY f
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
I S. S. ALKI, South, JAN. 14
First Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
H. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSON <t CO., Douglas
z:: - -aaMuaani :p/v^r^yi'-g??>..-aoFBiiii ? !???!??a?
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.--B.C. Coast Service
I- iilinit fi .11 J un.au f.,r I'ort .Simpaon, Prince Rupert. Swan>on, Alert liny, Vancouver
Victoria and Scuttle
PP'NCESS MAY JAN. 16
I i ? C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J.T.SPICKKTT. A.rt.
"i ; v ?*?+ * > Hj i M I II I I I I I
ALASKA COAST CO. ?
? >
To. Yakutat, Katnlln, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdcz, Latouche, Seward,
Scldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU "
S. S. YUKON DEC. 2/ i!
SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA "
J connecting at Scattic for San Francisco and Southern California ports
| J S. S. YUKON .... JAN. 15 ?
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ?
\ '
If For further information apply to
r S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle 11
j -f *" 1 ? 1 > II I I I I I I I I I I I > I I I I I I I
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
DoukUib nnti
Trcadwcll
s: 00 a. 11:. I
9:00 a. nt. [
11:00 a. m.;
1:00 p. m.
:!: 00 p m. I
1: ;:0 p. m.!
?I: p. m. j
S: 00 ;>. hi. t
9:00 p. tu.1
11:00 p. ill.
Lv. Tread
well for
Juneau
?8:2.r> a. m. I
9:25 a. m.'
12:00 noon
1:40 p. in.
3:25 p. m.
4 :55 p. m.
6:55 p. ni.
8:25 p. ni.
9:25 p. ni.
11:25 p. in.
leaves
Doujrlnx for
Juneau
?8:30 a. in. J
9:30 a.m.
! 12:05 p.m. j
1:45 p. m. (
1 3:20 p.it
5:30p.m.
' 7:05 p.m.
1 8:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a m. !
4:30 p. in.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. ra.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Nijrht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
m. i.? I
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL ANI) ANNEX }
Y Restaurant in Connection Established 1S81 European Plan I
COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME i
FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA j
1-I-i-l-l-I-i I--I -I -I -I -I 1 1 I I I"M I1H1
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
?a?iw-ixivjaijeaecr-.^i i.?nr-raauBSBM?in H
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
%
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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