OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 10, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-01-10/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

! JUNEAU LIQUOR COiMPANY, Inc.
^ We have for the table the
| CRESTA BLANCA AND EL DORADO WINES
FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH
$ Tel. 9-1 RYE AND BOURBON Front St. <
f OPERA LIQUOR CO., i?. j
J Thos. H. Ashby. Pres. A. G. Bays, Sec.-Trea.s. j
COR. SEWARD AND SECOND STREETS ]
? j
? j
? finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke ?
? J
f A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN 4
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck, Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
nara;..-. raris.-- .r" " ---??gr.riilVAAmWJI H'lmiCTMlr MIIMIIBIB^gasamg^XSSIZi:
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER"
FOR SALE AT ALL FIRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
???????AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
? WW W W VVV W W WWWWWVWWWIrVW
X Juneau Transfer Co. |
| coal wood X
? STORAGE X
! ?
X Mo> ing Carefully Done ?
X Haituauc Our Long Suit ?
? '
? FRONT STREET ? |
+ N<-\: ?! <>r t Rayir. nU Co. ? j
Ferro Engines I
a?a?a?e?i ????
Now carried in stock. Call
and inspect samples
Alaska Supply Co.
Sale Agents j
JUNEAU ALASKA J
i il;
X X
f ? -
I
| McCloskeys j
0 ' ^ I
? ?
i'-i11! li i'i' rn-1 . t > > >
i
The Louvre Bar ?
| " Al Carlson. Prop.
" | Imports and Domestic
:: LIQUORS AND CIGARS
;; RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT ? -
" Phone 3-3-5 Juneau ..I
*-:??! n i i i i i i i i i i i m m i i i i
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St. Juneau, Alaska
???????????????
?
R. P. NELSON
Wholesale and Retail Dealer
in All Kinds
STATIONERY
Typewriting Supplies. Blank
Bocks. Office Supplies. Sporting
Goods. Huyler's Candies, Gun
ther's Candles, Toys, Notions,
Books, Magazines. Waterman's
Fountain Pens, Conklln Pens,
Etc.
Cor. 2nd. and Seward Sts.
Juneau, Alaska
Berry's Store
Christmas Gifts
Arriving on Every Boat for
Everybody
HII I I I I I I 1II I I I I I I I I 1111J
:? The Alaska Grill
The Best Appointed
Place in Town t
; Best of Everything Served !!
! at Moderate Prices
! 1 11 I I * II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II }?
% THE BEST LOAF OF ?
j BREAD j
: ? s
I Is Sold At
\ San Francisco Bakery ?
? C. MESSERSCHMIDT, Prop. J
? ?
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK. Vice-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
F. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
| Navy League Strongly
j Urges a Better Sea Force
f
?
? NEW YORK, Jan. 10.?Tho Navy
? League of the United States has com
* pleted the following "general reas
ons." why a strong navy should be
: maintained:
^ Sea Power and History.
? Sea power was indispensable to the
? success of the Revolution.
? The navy fought and won the War
? of 1812.
I The Union was preserved as much
* by the blockading navy as by the
? Army of the North.
? The navy decided the outcome of
I the war with Spain.
? England's navy has given that coun
? try uninterrupted peace on the water
* for nearly 100 years, and her shores
? have not been invaded for nearly a
? thousand years.
Germany, with an adequate navy,
has been practically free from war
' on land or sea for forty years.
The National Defense.
Undefended resources Invite ag
gression.
The United States has 21,000 miles
of coast line to denfend?
The United States Navy has more
harbors with large cities and a larger
number of strategic points to defend
than any other nation's navy. ,
The navy must defend Porto Rico,
the Philippines, the Hawaiian Isl- j
ands, and the Panama Canal.
It is "better to be despised for too ,
anxious apprehension than be ruined
by too confident security."
American Policies.
The Monroe Doctrine. 1
The attitude of the United State3 |
jas to possession or ownership of stra- 1
tegic alien harbors and coaling sta- I
I tions. I
The neutrality of the Panama Can- I
al. including its safeguarding when t
'.other nations are at war. t
The restriction of Asiatic immi- t
i gration . t
The integrity of China. t
The rights of Americans traveling s
j abroad, regardless of blood or re- t
I ligion. 1
t
Under the caption "From the I
Standpoint of Economics" it is point- <
ed out that battleships are cheaper I
? than battles; that the money paid for t
the construction of battleships goes
to American workingmen and ship-it
builders: that the navy is a good c
school that teaches elllciency in i
many trades, and that the annual cost <
of the navy, which is some $130,000,- <
000, is cheap insurance against the i
cost of war, and represents that Amer
icans spend each year on now tires
for their automobiles.
"Outside the Sphere of War," is the
cuption of another list of reasons. In
it these services of the navy are set
forth:
The supression of the African sla c
trade.
The supression of piracy.
The opening of Japan.
The opening of Korea.
Arctic exploration and relief.
Protection of the fur seals.
Pioneer work of coast and geodetic
survey
The establishment of lighthouse ser
vice.
Pioneer work of the Weather Bu
reau.
The work of the Naval Observa
tory and Hydrographic Office.
Explorations and preliminary sur
veys for various Isthmian Canal
routes.
Frequent protection of missionar
ies and citizens abroad.
Frequent prevention of insurrection
in the West Indies and the Southern
republics.
Friendly offices to Cuba, Panama,
Santo Domingo and Nicaragua.
Repeated earthquake and famine re
lief at Messina, Martinque, and San
Francisco; in Ireland and else
where.
Under "Diplomacy" the league
points out the force a great navy
;ives to diplomacy. Naval power is a
legitimate factor in international set
tlements, it maintains, because it "Is
he evidence of national efficiency."
Under the caption "Peace Programs,"
he attention of Congress is called to
lie fact that disarmament and obliga
ory arbitration are incompatible;
hat armament may be the instrument
o force the arbitration of an adver
sary, and that the general arbitra
ion treaties adopted at the second I
Jague Conference failed to prevent
he forcible annexation by Austria of
Bosnia and Herzegovina, the seizure
if Tripoli by Italy, the invasion of
'ersia by Russia, and the conflict In
he Balkans.
As "General Reasons" the league
;alls attention to the unexpectedness
if war, the impossibility of improvis
ng a modern navy, and the ever-pres
>nt possibility of any one disturbing
dement causing a brawl in the fam
ly of nations.
I
Frank Chance Gets Tenth
Interest in the Yankees
CHICAGO. Jan. 10.?Frank Chance,)
who signed a contract yesterday for
three years as manager of the New
York American League, at $40,000
a year, is also said to have secured an
i interest in the club. While in Los
Angeles recently Chance said that to
manage the Yankees only under an
agreement whereby he could get part
! of the stock. "A salary alone would
j not tempt me," Chance is quoted
[ as saying. "They must give me a
tenth interest in the club or I will
stay right here on my orange farm."
This announcement bears out the
predictions of Chance's friends that
he would not return to baseball un
less he got an interest in the club
with which he signed. Chance had
an interest in the Chicago club, and
it was the sale of this stock that
caused his break with President
Murphy of the Chicago club.
Chance's friends say that there is
only one reason why ho will return
to the game, and that Is to vindicate
himself in the eyes of the baseball
world of the charges made by Mur
phy that he was physically and men
tally unfit to stay in baseball any
longer. Chance according to authori
tative information, is in good shape
mentally and physically and has the
word of the most expert New York
physicians that he will not be trou
bled with the ailment which was
caused by being hit in the head with
a ball some time ago.
A close friend, who has known
Chance for many years, said in rela
tion to the case: "I have had Frank
Chances' implicit confidences for
years and feel free to say that I do
not believe any financial temptation
would have been strong enough to
have him remain in baseball if he
? had been permitted to retire quietly
~ after disposing of his Interest in the
Chicago club.
"His is not a nature that requires
the excitement of the strenuous life
to make him enjoy living. He natur
ally prefers the simpler life and has
enough Interests outside of baseball
to keep him as busy as he wants to
FOR RENT ? Five-room house un
furnished. Inquire of Juneau Dairy.tf.
Every thing that will please a smok
er may be found at BURFORD'S.
bo. Only the belief that the public
and his friends would think that he
was pushed out of baseball as a 'has
been' could change his desire to
stay out of it, but that belief would
not be strong enough to tempt him
back without a stiff financial argu
ment in addition.
"It will take a pretty high salary to
make Chance take a second look at a
manager's contract, and If the Amer
ican League forces have an idea that
he will return to the game for any
thing near the salary called for in
his Chicago contract they will find
that the big deal has been pulled off
for nothing."
Christy Mathewson, real estate
agent, author, billiardist, motorist,
checker expert, and also a baseball
pitcher for the Giants, is Just now In
the insurance business, but he Is hav
ing a hard time making people believe
it. When Matty begins to talk Insur
ance with a prospective customer, the
conversation for five minutes is about
Insurance and for the next hour base
ball. So Matty had to call a halt.
He doesn't mind talking baseball in
summer, but in winter he wants to
talk insurance. So many people have
dropped into Mathewsons' office to
talk baseball that he had to put up
n sign. It reads:
"This is an insurance office and
not a lounging room. Christy Mat
hewson is interested in anything that
has to do with insurance. Ho does
not recall the score of the last game
of the World's Series."
But there is a lot of people that
the sign has no effect on. The other
day a man dropped in, sat down, and
lighted a cigar, and said: "How are
you Matty? I've seen you pitch many
a time."
"You've got the wrong man," an
swered Matty. "You don't seem to
know me. I'm Mathewson the Insur
, ance man, not the baseball pitcher.
' Can I talk to you about a policy?"
Matty says that if he could only
hide his identity he might sell more
I insurance.
SEAL SHIPT OYSTERS?Fresh at
the local agency?CHAS. GOLDSTEIN
Finest line of Calabash pipes in
Alaska at BURFORD'S.
SCHOOL CHILDREN
ENJOY SLEIGH PARTY
A bunch of kiddies had the time
of their llfo last night. One of Casey's
four-horBe teams was hitched to a
large freighting bob sleigh ? the
sleigh itself was piled high with a
shouting, singing throng of happy
youngsters as the rig went gliding
over the smooth hard streets.
The children were of Miss Case's
room, and comprised tho Fifth and
Sixth grades of Juneau's public school.
The boys of the party bore the fi
nancial burden while the girls contrib
uted the lunch that was very much
appreciated.
LOCAL MAN MADE
BUYER OF FISH
W. S. Stewart, traveling; agent of
the International Fish Company, will
stop off at Petersburg on his way
south. Olaf Lystad, of Juneau, Is to
bo the local agent of the company.
Mr. Stewart says that his company
will buy fish strictly on a cash ba
sis, paying In cash here In Juneau and
not by check that must be sent to
Seattle or other points for collection.
"We intend to buy fish," said Mr.
Stewart, "and pay for t hem at the
highest market price?that is we will
pay as much as any other concern.
Mr. Lystad Is provided with funds to
do the buying."
PACIFIC COAST CO.'S
OFFICERS COMING
J. C. Ford, president of the Pacific
Doast Cimpany; Jerome W. Smith,
general auditor of the same company
md C. E. Houston manager of the
:oal department, of the company?
ill of whom are defendants with the
company In the transportation case
:o be tried at once?are aboard the
Curacao enroute to Juneau.
Roger D. Pinneo, traveling freight
igent of the company and a num* ,
ier of witnesses are also aboard and
will be in attendance at court during
he progress of the trial.
Job Printing at The Empire Office
It F. CHEEK !
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNFD
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
I E. Wolland j
; Tailor j
!
C W. YOUNG COMPANY
Dealers in
Mining, Fishing, Plumbing
jj and Building Supplies
IF""'w _ -Z
PETERSBURG FISH CO.
All Kinds of
FRESH AND SALT FISH
CLAMS AND CRABS
All Orders Promptly Filled
PETERSBURG ALASKA
?I 11111 i 1811111111 n i n 1111 i I III i 18 'firi-w. h+:-wh-iw ;; ;
:: THE LATEST AMERICAN INVENTION
MAZDA LAMPS
:: AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF ??
ELECTRIC LIGHTING GOODS
| Can be obtained from the '
ALASKA ELECTRIC LIGHT & POWER CO.
! Third and Franklin Streets Juneau ??
........ ...... .......inllllllfllfll I It!
?
Better than the Best f
WITHOUT our knowledge, the Columbus Labo
ratories of Chicago tested Fisher's Blend
Flour for a Dakota Wheat Grower. The an
alysis ranked Fisher's Blend Flour higher in Gen
eral Average, Gluten Quality, Water Absorption and
Loaf Value than the best Dakota all-Hard Wheat Pat
ent Flour, which is the recognized standard for bread
stuff efficiency. Fisher's Blend Flour is a scientific
combination of Eastern Hard Wheat and Western Soft
Wheat, preserving the best qualities of each. It costs
you from 20 to 2.r>^ less than a straight Eastern Hard
Wheat Flour?does .
Fisher's Blend Flour
For Siili' by .-III Dealers
'
DO YOU TAKE IT? |
The Daily Empire publishes all the news, all the time
IT IS CLEAN, UP-TO-DATE, PROGRESSIVE I
One Dollar per Month Delivered by Carrier in Juneau, Douglas and Treadwell
TRY IT AND YOU WILL KEEP IT

xml | txt