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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 11, 1913, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-01-11/ed-1/seq-3/

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: JUNEAU LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc. \
J We have for the table the 5
| CRESTA BLANCA AND EL DORADO WINES t
FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH
| Tel. 9-1 RYE AND BOURBON Front St. ?
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! OPERA LIQUOR CO., inc. !
T Thus. H. Ash by. Pres. A. G. Bays, Sec.-Treas. \ [
? <?
? COR. SEWARD AND SECOND STREETS J;
? finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke J
x ?
A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN J
t
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck, Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
llome-Smoked
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER"
FOR SALE AT ALL FIRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
I
? ?
I Juneau Transfer Co. ?
: COAL WOOD ?
STORAGE |
X Moving Carefully Done ?
X Hairirauo Our Long Suit ?
I ? :
? FRONT STREET ? :
L j
Ferro Engines
Now ciirrieiistor<. Call <
arul inspect samples !
Alaska Supply Co.
Sale Agents
JUNEAU ALASKA
! |
j McQoskeys j
111:111111:11 i 111111111 r 11
i $
t The Louvre Bar ::j
' ' Al Carbon, Prop.
] | Imported and Domestic ? ?
LIQUORS AND CiGARS "?
;; RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT -
\ \ Phone 3-3-4 J uneau ? ?
?H?l I I 1 I I T I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St. Juneau, Alaska
R. P. NELSON
Wholesale and Retail Dealer
in All Kinds
STATIONERY
Typewriting Supplies, Blank
Books, Office Supplies, Sporting
Goods, Huyler's Candies, Gun
ther's Candies, Toys, Notions,
Books. Magazines, Waterman's
Fountain Pens, Conklin Pens,
Etc.
Cor. 2nd. and Seward Sts.
Juneau, Alaska
Berry's Store
Christmas Gifts
Arriving on Every Boat for
Everybody
H I I I I I I I I 1 I I II I II II 111ti >?
; The Alaska Grill ii
! TheUBeit Appointed
Place in Town J
;; Best of Everything Served !!
T at Moderate Prices
H11 iiI 11 I??i 111 I I I I II I III
thV best* loaf'of ### #|
I BREAD I
% Is Sold At |
? San Francisco Bakery ?
? O. MESSEKSCHMIDT, Prop. J
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY. Pres.
JOHN RECK, Vice-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
F. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
The Opening the Panama
Canal on Sept. 25,1913
; NEW YORK. Jan. 11.?Tho change
of government in the Panama Canal
Zone will not take place before spring.
Colonel Goethals will serve as Chief
Engineer until the canal is formally
opened on Jan. 1, 1915.
The first vessel will be sent through
the canal, barring the unforeseen,
Sept. 25, 1912, on the four hundredth
anniversary of the discovery of the
Pacific.
From then until the formal opening
the canal will be operated as a "sam
ple" for the training of the operating
force, the getting of everything in
final ship-shape. &c.
The canal, according to Col. Goe
thals, is now more than 75 per cent
completed, and July 1, next, will see
it ready for the turning in of the wa
ter. It is apprehended that the en
trance and presence of the water may
cause some further slides of the treach
erous banks, particularly at the Cu
lebra Cut, but the expectation is that
the dredges can take care by July 1
of the material thus deposited in the
big ditch.
As stated some time ago. Col. Goe
thals intends, when the canal is ago
ing, to retire from the Government
service and settle in New York as a
consulting engineer, with the idea of
making some money for his family.
Meantime, President Taft has asked
Congress to reward the Colonel's
work on the Isthmus by promoting
him to be a Major-General in the
army.
Col. GoethalB was born in New York
State and was graduated at the United
States Military Academy at West
Point 1n 1880. He was the second
ranking member of the clasB. He
spent two years in the Engineers'
| School at Willett's Point, and then
| he went on the staff of Gen. Nelson
A. Miles, as engineer of the Depart
ment of the Columbia. He built dams
at Cincinnati under Colonel Merrill,
and in 1903 he was selected for the
General Staff.
When Mr. Taft, then Secretary of
War, went to Panama In 1905, he took
Major Goethals along to help look in
to the canal work, and in 1907, Major
Goethals succeeded Theodore P.
Shouts as Chairman of the Isthmian
Canal Commission, with rank of chief
engineer of the canal construction,
and he has been chief engineer ever
since.
As chief engineer, Col. Goethals has
been practical}' in absolute charge of
the Canal Zone. He has cleared yel
low fever out of the Isthmus and has
been commended by the Roosevelt and
Taft administration for his energy in
pushing canal construction and in gov
erning the zone.
When he was in Europe, last April,
Emperor William, of Germany, told
him the canal ought to be wider, and
should be very strongly fortified. Col.
Goethals has had personal charge of
the construction of the canal forts.
Ho would make a Jungle of the Canal
Zone, believing that depopulation
would surprise against any surprises.
Bryan Is Working for
Peace Among Brethren
WASHINGTON, Dec. 30.? Speaker
Champ Clark has replied to a recent
editorial printed in the New York
World which commented upon what
might happen if .Mr. Bryan should be
come a member of .Mr. Wilson's Cab
inet. The suggestion was also made
that Speaker Clark should find his
personal resentment is such that he
can have no political or social rela
tions with .Mr. Bryan, and if his at
titude threatened to embarrass Presi
dent Wilson?then the House should
elect a Speaker who would be in har
mony with the administration.
The World also expressed its be
lief that if Clark had been nominated
at Baltimore instead of Wilson he
would have been defeated.
Commenting on the article Speaker
Clark said:
"There is no use for me to try to
answer that editorial. The only way
to answer an editorial like that is by
a suit for slander.
"The World has been against me
ever since William Randolph Hearst
and Senator William J. Stone came
out for me."
Further than this Mr. Clark would
not go.
There is no organized effort among
House Democrats to defeat Mr. Clark
for the Speakership, and there Is 110
prospect of any such thing. Mr. Clark
wants to succeed himself. He has
written a letter to each of the 295
Democrats elected to the next House,
saying that he will be a candidate for
the Speakership. Two hundred and
sixty-three members have pledged
f
themselves to vote for him. The re
maining thirty-two have not been
heard from. The Bryan Democrats
of the House do not anticipate any
fight on Mr. ClarK; they have no dis
position to start such a contest.
Soon after the November election
when William J .Bryan was here,
Representative Robert L. Henry ol
Texas. Chairman of the Rules Commit
tee. announced his declination to run
for the Speakership against Mr
Clark. Mr. Henry said, when he mad(
this announcement, that he was un
willing for Governor Wilson to begin
his administration with the handicai
of such a family row as a fight againsi
Speaker Clark would make.
A contest between himself and Mr
Clark, he declared, would mean a cer
tain split in the Democratic party ii
: the House, and even if he was sure
he could win he was not willing to
lend himself to a candidacy that
would wreck the House Democratic
majority at the beginning oi the Wil
son administration.
Bryan Not Against Clark.
Being Col. Bryan's friend, .Mr. Hen
ry's candidacy would have been con
strued as an etTort to renew the feud
that arose at Baltimore between Mr.
Bryan and Mr. Clark. It is known
here that Mr. Bryan acquiesced in
' Mr. Henry's declination to oppose Mr.
Clark.
Upon taking this stand, Mr, Hen
ry voiced the sentiment of most of
Mr. Bryan's friends in the House. The
aim of Democratic leaders here is to
bring about unity of action among
their leaders with the view of redeem-!
ing the pledges made at Baltimore.
Mr. Bryan, it is known, is doing his
best, to be friendly with Messrs. Clark
and Underwood of the House and
party leaders in the Senate. He has
not said a word directly or indirectly
against Mr. Clark. Mr. Bryan's close
friends say that he would not undo
what he did at Baltimore, but that he
is willing to meet Mr. Clark half way,
now.
Representative Henry, me oiuy man
in the House that has been mentioned
as a possible opponent of Speaker
: Clark in the Speakership contest, has
told his supporters that he would
rather see an administration in behalf
of the people than to be Speaker of
the House or to hold any office under
President Wilson.
Mr. Bryan has been for conciliation
and concentration ever since the elec
tion. His visits to Washington have
i been to that end.
Democratic leaders in Washington
. do not believe that Mr. Clark will be
antagonistic to Mr. Wilson if Bryan
, is appointed to his Cabinet. They see
no reason why Mr. Clark, as Speaker
? of the House, and Mr. Bryan, as a pos
. sible Secretary of State should clash.
L Mr. Underwood has announced that
the Committee on Ways and Means
5 will give hearings from Jan. 6 to Jan.
. 31. This gives a time for schedules on
. chemicals, oils and paints, .earths,
I
) earthenware and glassware, metals,
t wood sugar, tobacco, agricultural pro
ducts, cotton manufactures, flax and
hemp, wool and sundries. The pro
. posed bills will be ready by the mid
i die of March.
CHURCH NOTES.
Presbyterian Church
John B. Stevens, Pastor.
Morning service at 11, subject
"Peter in Pilate's Court." Communioi
service. Evening service at 7:30, sut
ject, "The Antitoxin of Transgret
_ sion." Special music by choir o
" men's voices. The public is cordiall
welcomed to all these services.
Christian Science
Christian Science service will b
held Sunday at 11 a. m., in the Chri:
tian Scence hall. Subject, "Sacn
ment." The public is welcome. Li
erature and information of Christia
Science can be had Wednesday froi
two until five at the reading room.
Methodist Episcopal.
R. C. Blackwell, Pastor.
Morning services at 11 o'clock, ant
in the evening at 7:30 o'clock. Ser
mon themes: "Weaknes and
Strength," and "Forgiveness anc
Atonement." Sunday School at II
a noon. Young People's meeting at 6:30
Prayer-meeting Thursday evening.
1C. CHEEK
e THE TAXIDERMIST
3- THAT KNOWS
\
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
n Mounted.
? SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
I
THE LIMITS OF HEARING
There are many persons who can
not hear the squeak of a mouse, just
as many more cannot hear the deep,
rolling bass of a church organ, and
yet neither are deaf.
The human ear is a peculiar thing.
It can distinguish tones ranging}
through nearly ten octaves. The low
est tone than can be heard by any one
has sixteen vibrations a second; mid
dle C on the piano vibrates 512 times
a second; the highest not distinguish
able has 1(1,384 vibrations a second.
Beyond that no ear can catch the
sound. But some oars fail before
that number of vibrations is reached,
and so it Is that they cannot catch the
mouse's tiny squeak. About twenty
vibrations a second is the lowest tone
that most ears can catch?below that ,
all sound, no matter how loud, is a
myth.
Ordinary music is written for tones
between 32 nad 4,096 vibrations. A
full orchestra would not use any In
struments pitched above or below
these tones. The chirp of a cricket is
higher than any written music and
there are some people of perfectly
normal hearing who can't hear the
cry of this commonplace insect.
THE FISHING FLEET.
H
Rolfe?Sailed Dec. 26.
Kennebec?Ar. Jan. 3. !
Aloha?Jan. 9. j
Dora H.?Sailed Dec. 26.
Pacific?Out. !
Active.?Out. I
Olga?Sailed Dec. 28.
Belle?Sailed Dec. 11.
Highland Queen?Sailed Dec. 28. [
Louise?Sailed Dec 27. ;
Norman Sunde?Ar. Jan. 8
Volunteer.?Out. \
Vesta?Ar. Jan. 9. J
Valkyrie?Out. <
Xhanthus?Sailed Dec. 19.
Waife?Sailed Jan 5. ;
White Star?In port.
Listei?Sailed Dec. 26.
Olympic?Sailed Dec. 10.
Dick?At Sitka
Dolphin?Ar. Jan. 3.
Halley's?Out.
Alameda?Out.
Annie?Sailed Dec. 3ft.
Uranus?Out.
Pollux?In port.
Cedric?Out.
Thelma?Sailed Jan. 9.
Alvida?Sailed Dec. 14.
Comet?Sailed Dec. 21.
Solkol?Sailed Dec. 30.
Anita Phillips?In port
Standard?Ar. Jan. 3.
Gjoa?Sailed Jan. 8.
The Dally Empire delivered In Ju
neau. DouRlas and Trendwell for $l.ftft
a month.
I *"1
i: r. Wolland 1
II Tailor j
o t
? t
<> O
? o
C W. YOUNG COMPANY
Dealers in
Mining, Fishing, Plumbing
and Building Supplies
Front Street Juneau
PETERSBURG FISH CO,
All Kinds of
FRESH AND SALT FISH
CLAMS AND CRABS
All Orders Promptly Filled
PETERSBURG ALASKA
111 ii i ii 1111 i i n n 111 in n 11 n ; ;?
| THE LATEST AMERICAN INVENTION ii
MAZDA LAMPS
: AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF
ELECTRIC LIGHTING GOODS
| Can be obtained from the '!
ALASKA ELECTRIC LIGHT & POWER CO. ;;
? ?
! Third and Franklin Streets Juneau ??
"i 111 ii n 111111; n i ii m s i i-m-h-i-ho i ?i * j
rwwrawi
IM LS ? ID) NLM
1 Ij "J I! ')
H ? J ? ll
Better than the Best [
WITHOUT our knowledge, the Columbus Labo
ratories of Chicago tested Fisher's Blend
Flour for a Dakota Wheat Grower. The an
alysis ranked Fisher's Blend Flour higher in Gen
eral Average, Gluten Quality, Water Absorption and
Loaf Value than the best Dakota all-Hard Wheat Pat
ent Flour, which is the recognized standard for bread
stuff efficiency. Fisher's Blend Flour is a scientific
combination of Eastern Hard Wheat and'Western Soft
Wheat, preserving the best qualities of each. It costs
you from 2') to 259? less than a straight Eastern Hard
Wheat Flour?does
Fisher's Blend Flour
For Sale by All Dealers ,
DO YOU TAKE ST?
I The Daily Empire publishes all the news, all the time
IT IS CLEAN, UP-TO-DATE, PROGRESSIVE
One Dollar per Month Delivered by Carrier in Juneau, Douglas and Treadwell
TRY IT AND YOU WILL KEEP IT

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