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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 15, 1913, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-01-15/ed-1/seq-3/

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JUNEAU LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc.
?
? We have for the table the
f CRESTA BLANCA AND EL DORADO WINES
FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH
? Tel. 9-4 RYE AND BOURBON ?"rent St. 4
?
| OPERA LIQUOR CO., he. [
J Thus. H. Ashby, Pres. A. G. Bays, Sec.-Treas. a
COR. SEWARD AND SECOND STREETS f
| 1
? finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke J
| A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN |
? ?
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
)??am iu,? wiwiiiMra?^????
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER"
FOR SALE AT ALL FIRST-CLASS .ARS AND CAFES I
? TTV W WTVTVVvTVVVVVW TVVV
? ?
? Juneau Transfer Co. |
: COAL WOOD |
J STORAGE :
J Moving Carefully Done I
+ Haggaec Our I.one Suit ? j
FRONT STREET ? (
T i
?????????????????????????? ;
Ferro Engines ?
?mVMHBMHBDCBBBffiaaaUB
Now carriedjin stock. Call
and inspect samples
Alaska Supply Co.
Sale Agents
Jl'NEAU ALASKA
: x
? ?
i i
i McCloskeys |
I I
1111111 ii i i 111 n n 11111 i-H'
? |
| The Louvre Bar ::
T A1 CarUon, Prop.
T Imported andfDomettic ? ?
I LIQUORS AND CIGARS ??
T RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT
T Phono 3-3-5 Juneau ? ?
H 1 1 I I II ! I I I ! I I I II I I I I I I I I
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St. Juneau. Alaska
R. P. NELSON
Wholesale and Retail Dealer
in All Kinds
STATIONERY
Typewriting Supplies, Blank
Books. Office Supplies, Sporting
Goods, Huyler's Candles, Gun
ther's Candies. Toys, Notions,
Books. Magazines, Waterman's
Fountain Pens, Conklin Pens,
Etc.
Cor. 2nd. and Seward Sts.
Juneau. Alaska
Berry's Store
LADIES' GOODS
Arriving on Every Boat for
Every Occasion
?\ h 11 ii 11111111111111111 n
; The Alaska Grill ii
1 he'Beit Appointed
!. Place in ' 'own +
i; Best 'of Everything Served !!
at Moderate Prices
Ml I I I I I I I II I I I I ? I I I II 1 I I 1
V
O THE BEST LOAF OF ?
| BREAD f
% Is Sold At %
| San francisco Bakery :
| G. MESSERSCHMIDT. Prop, i
First National
Bank.
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
.business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK. Vice-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
F. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
j at Burford's
Americans Lead In the
Philanthropies of 1912 j
f
The year 1912 was notable for the
large number of benefactions for edu
cational and philanthropic purposes.
The total benefactions accruing from
amounts of $10,000 up, were approxi
mately $302,000,000. It is probable
that the sum of the lesser donations
would reach about $25,000,000, mak
ing $327,000,000 in all. These figures
exceed the preceding year by $152,000,
000.
Kducational works were the most
popular channel for the distribution
of money; hospitals aud the care of
the aged came next, with gifts for
religious enterprises a close third.
Besides the known amounts there
were innumerable donations by per
sons whose identity was not disclosed
or disclosed to only a few.
I
In England during the year 1912
the benefactions aggregated only
about $20,000,000.
The American benefactions would
more than pay for a year's mainte
nance or the Army and Navy. The
aggregate is more than the capital of
the Bank of England or of the Im
perial Bank of Germany, and exceeds
the amount of money in the Sub
Treasury in New York.
During tho past twelve years $1,
502,000,000 has been given away in
thiB country?which if distributed to
all of the inhabitants of the earth
would be 92 cents for each individual,
or it would supply $16.33 to each in
habitant of the continental United
States.
* *
? GIVERS OF $1,000,000 OR OVER DURING CALENDAR YEAR 1912 *
? ?
? J. Pierpont Morgan $51,000,000 *
? Andrew Carnegie 10,000,000 *
? The Bell Telephone Company 10,000,000 ?
? Mrs. Robert Carson 5,000,000 ? ~
? Captain John C. Martin 4,500,000 * ,
? P. A. B. Widener 4,000,000 * \
? John D. Rockefeller 3,000,000 * <
? Richard T. Crane 2,135,000 * <
? Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Ryan 2,000,000 ? J
? George F. Baker 2,000,000 * <
? Henry F. Dimock 1,867,000 ? <
? Mrs. Caroline Neustardter 1,500,000 * J
? John D. Rockefeller, jr 1,100,000 * J
? Mr8. Russell Sage 1,000,000 * <
? Mrs. E. H. Harriman 1,000,000 * <
? Calvary Morris 1,000,000 * J
? Francis L. Leland 1,000,000 * <
? Edward Jackson 1,000,000 ? q
? Sears, Roebuck & Co 1,000,000 ? ?
? Mary Packer Cummings 1,000,000 ? !
? Mr. and Mrs. Levi P. Morton 1,000,000 * [
? Edwin Bancroft Foote 1,000,000 ? ?
? D. M. Parson 1,000,000 * I
? Mrs. Marshall O. Terry 1,000,000 * ;
? William Hall Penfold 1,000,000 ? ?
? Mrs. Cornelia Storrs 1,000,000 ?
? Sebastian de Lawrence 1,000,000 ?
? Henry Iden 1,000,000 *
? Miss Flora E. Isham 1,000,000 *
? Gen. T. Coleman du Pont 1,000,000 ?
? Dr. Moris Loeb 1,000,000 ?
? ?
*******************
Pennsylvania Scientist
( Praises Kenai Peninsula
<
j
Dr. A. W. Crane, a scientist of note I
and a member of the faculty of the *
University of Pennsylvania, who is j
in Alaska investigating coa' resourc
es of the territory in the interests of j
Outside capitalists, has become great- j
!y interested in the placer gold depos- i
its located on the Kenai river. 1
Prof. Crane returned to Seward re- i
cently and speaks in glowing terms ot
the country and the panning that he i
did while out.
Prof. Crane declares that the Kenai
; river is soon destined to become one
of the greatest dredging fields in the
world, and expresses his surprise that
big capital has not grabbed all of the
valuable ground.
"I panned on the river from the up
per Kenai river to the lower lake and
got gold in every pan that I took and
some of the pans showed a mighty
fine placer prospect indeed," 'Prof.
Crane said. There is an abundance of
black sand, and I have seldom seen
fine gold that separates from the
black sand as easily as the deposits
on the Kenai river.
"At the head of the river we found
coarse gold, but I notice that as we
went down the river the gold kept get
ting finer and finer, although the pans
appeared to be of apparently the same
value. High up on the hills on the,
<
ower river I found in the pan coarse
;old that was rough and sharp cor
lered, showing that it was not long
h-ee from the ledge.
"There is every evidence of quart/,
ledges on the hills back of the lower
lake, and I will be greatly surprised
If some very valuable mining property
is not developed in this section in the
near future.
"The greatest drawback to the thor
ough prospection of that section of
the country is the thick moss that .
covers everything, making it hard to
locate the ledges. 1 examined one
property where the owners are work
ing on a four-foot ledge of high grade
gold-bearing quartz that would be con
sidered a sensational showing were It
anywhere but in Alaska, and up here
It is looked on as a very ordinary
showing. 1 think it is very valuable
property.
"I also visited the dredging ground
that was recently taken over by the
German Syndicate of Seattle and was
surprised at the uniform richness of
the gravel. I think that the Kenai
peninsula is the richest mineralized
country that I ever visited, and I pre
dict that within the next few years
you will have a big, rich, prosperous
quartz camp with the Kenai river sur
prising the dredging end of the mining
world."
WHY IS WHOOPING COUGH?!
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jan. 15. ?;
Frank Burr Mallory, associate pro
fessor of pathology at the Harvard1
Medical School, has definitely proved |
that the symptoms of whooping cough i
are caused by the bacillus pertussi. |
bits and children.
He has experimented on puppies, rab
The bacilli form rather sticky col
onies, apparently mat the cilia togeth
er and interfere with their normal
movements. They thus cause a con
stant irritation, which brings about
spasmodic coughing, terminating in a
~ violent intake of air, which is the
whoop.
Dr. J. A. Honeij, another Harvard
man, is studying leprosy at. Penikese
island, where guinea pigs, horses, cows
and other animals are used for his ex
periments.
WILL CLOSE AT SIX
The patrons of the C. W. Young Co.,
and the general public, are noitfied
that the store will be closed at six o'
? clock on Saturday night during the
winter months. 3t
"COMMANDED BY GOD"
TO CUT HIS ARM OFF
BUFFALO, Jan. 15. ? Harry Pull
man. twenty-three years old, of Brook
lyn, iB in a serious condition at a lo
cal hospital from the loss of his left
arm, which was severed by the wheels
of a trolley car.
"I purposely put my left arm under
the wheels of a street car in order to
have is cut of," said Pullman in a
sworn statement. '"I was commanded
by God to do this and I did it of my
own free will. I am not a drinking
man. I knew and realized what 1
was doing."
The "accident" was a mystery until
Pullman made his statement on re
covering consciousness.
FEMMER & RITTER
See this firm for all kinds of dray
mg and hauling. We guarantee sat
isfaction and reasonable prices. Coal
delivered promptly. Femmer & Rit
ter's Express. Stand Burford's Cor
ner. Phone 314. Residence phones
402 or 403. ???
ENGINEER LOCATES HERE
Mr. C. K. Porner, formerly connect*
id with the Hoard of State Harbor
Commissioners, Department of Engin
ierlng, Is now connected with the
\laska-Gastlneau Mining Co., and is
'eslding with Mr. R. J. Wulzen ami
amily in their beautiful cottage on
he sky line of Juneau.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11. 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16. 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27.
March 5, 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Punter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. in.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21.
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eaglo River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin. El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15. 21, 27. Dec. 3,
9, 15. 21, 27, Jan. 2, 8. 14. 20.
26, Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9, 16, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER ?
Watkins 8 Gerdon In
expert blacksmiths ? ;
and IRON workers | !
General Blacksmithing, Horse- ? ?
Shoeing, Iron and Marine Work + !
Estimates Furnished and T ! j
Work Guaranteed ? ?
FRANKLIN STREET * |
Near Alaska Steam Laundry ? '
i
mTiYiYiTiYiYn'rH i11 ? I-H j
j The Unique Millinery ??
- SPECIAL SALE FANCY GOODS :T
L ??:
j. Suitable for Christmas Gifts ??!
?1_T I I III H Ml Mil 1' 1 -I-l-l-H-H* I
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
'
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
P I
| E. Wolland j
Tailor f
t
o
?
!
?
C W. YOUNG COMPANY
Dealers in
Mining, Fishing, Plumbing
and Building Supplies
Front Street Juneau
PETERSBURG FISH CO.
All Kinds of
FRESH AND SALT FISH
CLAMS AND CRABS
All Orders Promptly Filled
PETERSBURG ALASKA
tii i it i in i i 11 I I i I I I I I I I I I I I II n it n I I I 111 M I I I 11 w r
j THE LATEST AMERICAN INVENTION il
MAZDA LAMPS
: AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF ??
ELECTRIC LIGHTING GOODS
; Can be obtained from the
ALASKA ELECTRIC LIGHT & POWER CO.
! Third and Franklin Streets Juneau jj
? ? ? ? > ? i ? i i i i ? I i i Lit
In A Class By Itself
IMPARTIAL tests made by The Columbus Labo
ratories of Chicago give Fisher's Blend Flour
a higher rating than that of the Dakota all-Hard
Wheat Patent Flour.
Considering that this scientific combination of East
ern Hard Wheat and Western Soft Wheat costs you
from 20 to 2or/> less than what has always been con
sidered the highest grade of breadstuff, you can readily
see that it will pay you to insist on having
Fisher's Blend Flour
For Sale by All Dealers
DO YOU TAKE IT?
The Daily Empire publishes all the news, all the time
&
IT IS CLEAN, UP-TO-DATE, PROGRESSIVE I
One Dollar per Month Delivered by Carrier in Juneau, Douglas and Tread well
TRY IT AND YOU WILL KEEP IT

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