OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 17, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-01-17/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postoffice at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
O^e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU, ALASKA, FRIDAY. JANUARY 17, 1913
A TIMELY CRITICISM.
THE DOUGLAS ISLAND NEWS, a clean, able and well con
ducted newspaper, has the following: criticism of a pernic
ious habit of certain newspapers: "
"The habit which some of the newspapers of Southeastern
Alaska have of taking up matters which are on trial in the fed
eral court and quoting supposed facts which cannot help but
have a bearing on the case at issue, may not come within the lim
its of contempt, but it is not right, nor, in fact, good sense. It
has the appearance, take it as you will, of having back of it a
desire to influence the court or the juries. However little that
influence may be. it is not the province of a newspaper to sway
the opinions of the people at such a time, nor to incite their pas
sions. The theory of our courts is that every man accused of
a crime should have a fair and impartial trial, and judges grow
gray in honest efforts to bring it to pass. However, when any
newspaper or individual plainly shows a desire to "butt in" at
such a time for any purpose, it is not only an insult to the court,
but a direct slap in the faces of all decent and honest people.
The printing of news is the province of newspapers, but every
publisher should use the judgment which God has given him to
prevent the printing of news which may do more harm than
good. Of course we realize the weaknesses of humanity extend
even to the men in charge of large newspapers, and that with the
best of motives mistakes will be made, but. as they used to say
down in Texas, 'A man who will let the same snake bite him
twice is a fool.'"
THE DEADLY FROST IN CALIFORNIA.
SOUTHERN California seems to have been hit a severe blow
bv the recent visitation of frost, which damaged the citrus
crops many millions of dollars. Recent advices state that
many orange and lemon growers have been practically ruined.
The California Assembly has been asked to furnish State relief
for the banks of the citrus districts, the idea being for the State
to lend the banks money on call at low rate of interest. Not only
this, but Stanford University is feeling the effect of the unpre
cedented conditions now obtaining, as the University has been
depleted of more than two hundred students because of the fi
nancial losses that have been experienced; and many more from
the orange belt are expecting to leave before the end of the
present semester.
For the first time in their lives many of the people of San
Francisco looked out on snow-clad hills during the brief reign
of the frost king. And these things and conditions in "Sunny
California" serve to remind us that we of the higher latitudes
have always something to compensate us in regions, the thought
of which, seems to give the benighted Southerners a chill. We
do not have to sit up nights fearing the biting frosts that nip the
buds, and as for snow-capped mountains, we can always lift up
our eyes and see them in all their rugged grandeur whatsoever
the season of the year. And the air of the North is bracing and
life-giving, and who that has felt its invigorating influences
would change their abode for the enervating southern latitudes?
Well, some, perhaps, but not the majority of the sons and daugh
ters of the North.
MAKING A MOUNTAIN OF A MOLEHILL.
THERE seems to be a great pother over little Cipriano Castro,
one time dictator of Venezuela, but for some years now an
exile from his native country. Castro has been detained at
the Government immigration station on Ellis Island, in New
York harbor, for several weeks, while the Secretary of Com
merce and Labor and a board of inquiry have been solemnly
considering what to do with the little man. They then agreed
that this ope-time fierce and warlike swashbuckler?on his na
tive heath?was an undesirable person and resolved to deport
.him. An attempt to habeas corpus Castro failed, and now he
has made a personal appeal to Secretary Nagel to reverse the
finding of the inquiry board.
Behold how great a matter a little erstwhile firebrand has
kindled. But while Castro may have once been dangerous to
his own people in Venezuela, he would be as harmless as a suck
ing dove in the United States. His detention by the immigra
tion authorities would ere this have been a matter of diplomatic
intercourse had he not been a man without a country. This re
public has nothing to fear from Cipriano Castro, and our gov
ernment seems to be elevating a small molehill into a consid
erable mountain.
A MILLIONAIRE'S ADVICE TO HOUSEWIVES.
JAMES J. HILL has turned aside for a while from his great in
dustries to give advice to housewives concerning household
thrift and the expenditure of money, says an exchange. "The
tendency of the average woman," he says, "is to buy everything
as cheaply as possible. That is the worst kind of economy."
This is a new illustration when they undertake to teach
something they know nothing about or to give advice to an
other concerning his business. What Mr. Hill does not know !
about the economies of the average American housewife would
fill a book. It was he who said during the discussion of the in- ]
crease in prices that problem was not one of the high cost of
living but the cost of high living, being doubtless unaware that c
those on whom the burden of high prices presses most heavily 1
never did any high living in theif lives.
The housewife as a rule knows well enough that it is poor .
economy to buy coal by the basket instead of by the ton, but
she cannot afford the ton. She knows that cheap shoddy is not
so economical as all wool, but where come the wages that will
enable her to clothe her family in wool? The American house
wife hasn't the financial cleverness of James J. Hill, but she *
knows more about the care-taking of the home on a working- c
man's wages than he can ever teach her. w
1111111II1111II11IIII11111II11II1111
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home ::
Nothing adds mart' to the attractiveness of tho home than , ,
a well-appointed tnble. It help* to make tho home the place , ,
home ought to be. And you would be surprised. perhapa, , ,
how much it adds to the positive relish of the meal. Wo , ,
make t easy for you to supply your home?little by little, if , ,
you like?with a tasteful pattern of silverware. , ,
(These goods are up-to-date and moot reliable of any made , ,
Come and See Our Look for the Trade Mark , ,
Silverware Department th* \ \
GORHAM CO. ! i
r and OPTICIAN . ?
I I I I II I I II I I I I 111 1 I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I II I II
ARSENICfOUND
IN HUMAN SYSTEM
PARIS, Jan. 16.?An effort to obtain
the revision of the trial of Mme. Le
farge, a young and beautiful society
woman who was sentenced to impris
onment for life in 1840 for the mur
der of her husband by poisoning him
with arsenic, is to be made by a pow
erful committee of scientific men,
writers and politicians which has Just
been formed.
The case of Mme Lefarge was very
similar to that of Mrs. Maybrick. The
conviction was due principally to the
evidence of the great chemist, Mat
thieu Orfila. who swore to the pres
ence of arsenic In the dead man's
body. Another leading scientist of
the period, Francois Raspall, hastened
to Tulle, where the trial took place,
in order to declare to the Jury that
Orfila's evidence was insufficient, as
arsenic was present in ail bodies, but
he arrived too late.
Prof. Gabriel Bertrand has Just con
cluded a series of studies showing in
controvertibly that arsenic exists In a
general way In every living organism
and further that the methods hitherto
employed to test the presence of ar
senic in bodies had had the effect of
introducing arsenic ir.to those bodies.
Mme. Lefarge died in 1855, two
years after she had been pardoned by
Napoleon III.
PRINCES' TRUST GETS
NO STEAMSHIP LINE
BERLIN, Jan. 16.?Emden is not to
be the terminus of a steamship line
between New York and Germany, but!
is to be made a fortnightly port of
call on the way to America for some
steamers of the now existing lines.
The government of Prussia has
been accused of acting unfairly in re
fusing to grant the concession asked
for by the so-called "Princes' Trust,"
under the direction of Prince Max
Egen su Fuerstenberg and Prince
Christian Kraft von Hohenlohe-Oeh
ringenz, and favoring instead the lines
already in operation from other Ger
man ports.
The Prussian Minister of Com
merce Rheinhold Sydew, said in the
Reichstag today negotiation have
just been concluded, with the result
above stated.
The Hamburg-American line and
North German Lloyd have agreed to
also establish services between Em
den and South America, Asia and
Australia.
THE FISHING FLEET.
Rolfe?Ar. Jan. 15.
Kennebec?Ar. Jan. 3.
Aloha?Jan. 9.
Dora H.?Sailed Dec. 26.
Pacific?Out.
Active.?Out
Olga?Sailed Dec. 23.
Belle?Sailed Dec. 11.
Highland Queen?Sailed Dec. 28.
Louise?Sailed Dec 27.
Norman Sunde?Ar. Jan. 8
Volunteer.?Out.
Vesta?Ar. Jan. 9.
Valkyrie?Out.
Xhanthus?Sailed Dec. 19.
Waife?Sailed Jan 5.
White Star?In port.
Lister?Sailed Dec. 26.
Olympic?Sailed Dec. 10.
Dick?At Sitka
Dolphin?Ar. Jan. 3.
Halley's?Out.
Alameda?Out.
Annie?Sailed Dec. 30.
Uranus?Out
Pollux?In port
Cedric?Out.
Thclma?Sailed Jan. 9.
Alvida?Sailed Dec. 14.
Comet?Sailed Dec. 21.
Solkol?Sailed Dec. 30.
Anita Phillips?In port
Standard?Ar. Jan. 3.
Gjoa?Sailed Jan. 8.
REMARRIES HIS "WIDOW" ;
ST. LOUIS, Jan. 16.?David T. Dra- ;
ler was annoyed at seeing his di- <
-?orced wife's name in the city direc
ory as "Caroline Draper, widow," and
?emarried here today.
Since their divorce the directory
:ompany failed to observe the distinc
ion between a widow and a divorce,
:onsequently Draper had tho shivers -
?very time he saw h's former wife's
lame in directory' type.
WILL CLOSE AT SIX
The patrons of the C. W. Young Co., 2
nd the general public, are notified i
bat the store will be closed at six o'- j
lock on Saturday night during the 4
rinter months. 3t ^
HAINES WILL BE
POSSIBLE TERMINUS
H. P. M. Birkiublue, the well known
civil engineer residing at Haines ar
rived on the Georgia last night be
ing summoned to Juneau to testify
in the transportation case now on
trial here.
Mr. Birkinbine was in Haines at
the time the commission sent out by
Congress to investigate Alaska rail
way projects, made its appearance.
In fact. It was a part of Mr. Birkin
bine's duty to bIiow the commission
over the route from Haines to the
interior us far as they cared to go.
The time allotted to the commission
was limited and Haines being the last
place visited the visit was of necessity
not extended.
Howevor, they were taken up tho
Chilcat valley about 12 miles. The
timber found in this section was dif
ferent from that found in any other
district that had beon visited and the
commission voiced their surprise over
tho improvement. They were aston
ished to see horses and cattle running
loose and living on tho forage of the
country. They were amazed at the
large valley and the easy grade lead
ing over the divide into the great in
terior of Alaska.
As Mr. Birkinbine is the engineer
who made the reconnoissance for the
proposed Alaska-Midland, the com
mission seized him and put him
through a third dogrco cross examin
ation as to what existed beyond the
divide. After six hours of this work
and the taking of ncteB it was evident
that much food for thought had been
obtained. Upon leaving Haines for
the East they announced the fact
that they would have a conference
with the Canadian railroad commis
sion with reference to the support that
could be expected from Canada to
ward an international route.
For you breakfast?Larrowe's buck
wheat flour?guaranteed absolutely
pure. In ten-pound sacks. Sanitary
Grocery, phone 85. 2t.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mall Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killlsnoo and Sitka?
S: 00 a. m., Nov. 5. 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23. 29. Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27,
March 5. 11, 17. 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4, 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9, 15. 21. 27, Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20,
26. Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9, 15, 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
Professional Cards
' ' ??? I
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-ATLAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
|
ATTORN EY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEY8-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
1
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office?Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-ATLAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices; Juneau, Alaska
6eattlf, Wash.
The Empire
for
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer ?, ?t HUMBOLDT I The Alaska Flyer
NORTHBOUND JAN. 22
SOUTHBOUND JAN. 23
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Office, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOKD, Agent
? -l-H-H-H-H-H 1 11111111111 I H-I H 1 1 H H
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO. |
X STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- X
;; BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY "
- JEFFERSON Northbound JAN. 21 Southbound JAN. 22 X
;; NORWESTERN " JAN. 22 Southbound JAN. 28 "
;; MARIPOSA " FEB. 1 Southbound FEB. 7 ;;
MARIPOSA Southbound JAN. 19 X
Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through 4*
!! tickets to San Francisco. X
?? ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS EL NOWELL, Agt. X
?H-H-H-H I-I-I--I-I--I- U I?I -I I-.I- -I -I I I I 11 M IMIlH'H'M'l 1 1 HI
NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP COMPANY j
Operating S. S. ALKI and S. S. NORTHLAND
S. S. ALKI, South, JAN. 14 I
First Class Fare to Seattle $19.00
Second Class Fare to Seattle $12.00
IH. C. BRADFORD, Mgr., Pier 4, Seattle.
SOWERBY & BELL, Juneau JOHN HENSON &. CO., Douglas |
1 MIMII?miiiii ?iiinmin
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CC).~B.C.CoastService I
Sailing frem Juneau for Port Simpson. Prince Itupcrt. Swoniton, AJert Bay. Vancouver (
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY JAN. 16
Front and Seward Sta. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE T. SPICK ETT. Agt.
4-fH I 1 It t I I I I i I I ? I I I I I I I I I I ? 1 I I I I I I I I 1 I I I H I I I I I I I I I
jj ALASKA COAST CO. ii
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Seward, ..
!! Seldovla?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
!! S. S. YUKON DEC. 27 1!
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA "
11 connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports J j
; ; S. S. YUKON .... JAN. 15 ? -
; ' Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ? >
?; For further Information apply to ?'?
;; S. H. Ewlng, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle
i-bt 1111?11111 Ii 11111111181111111111111111111111111111
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operatlng Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU. DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Douglas and
Trcodwcll
?8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trend* '
well for
Juneau
?8:25 a. in.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
Leaves i
Doyylu for j
Juneau
?8:30 a. m.
9:30 a. m.
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. ra.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. ra.
5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday NUcht Only
1 11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m._
'^Sunday Schedule same an above, except trip leaving Juneau at 8 a. m. la omitted |
+-H-K H I I I 1 I 1 I 1 i I I II I I I I II 1 I 1 1 1 I I 1 I 1 II 1 1 1 1-I I 1 I 1 I 111 1 I ?
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX j
I) Restaurant In Connection Established 1881 European Plan !L
;; COMMERCIAL MEN'8 HOME I
"1 FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA ?
?H-S-H I I I-I ?! 1 1 I 1 i 1 I 1 1 1 1 11 II 1 1-1- M' 1 I 1 I -H-I H M 111 1 1 1 ill 1 -H
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Kegal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES. FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA -TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

xml | txt