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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 31, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-01-31/ed-1/seq-3/

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JUNEAU LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc. ?
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x We have for the table the *
J CRESTA BLANCA AND EL DORADO WINES i
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FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH ;
? Tel. 9-1 RYE AND BOURBON 'ront St. 4
I OPERA LIQUOR CO., inc. I
? Thos. II. Ashby, Pres. A. G. Bays, Sec.-Trcas. t
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COR. SEWARD AND SECOND STREETS
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? finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke %
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t A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN %
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ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER"
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?Juneau Transfer Co. ?
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? COAL WOOD |
J STORAGE ;
Z Moving: Carefully Done ?
Z IkiKKaire Our Long Suit ?
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? FRONT STREET J
O V d i*-o. ?
? Watkins 8 Gerdon ?
? EXPERT BLACKSMITHS ?
t and IRON WORKERS J
? General 8lacksmithing. Horse- ?
^ Shoeing. Iron and Mapine Work ^
x Estimates Furnished and j
? Work Guaranteed ?
FRANKLIN STREET ?
Z Near Alaska Steam Laundry J
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j McCloskeys |
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? The Louvre Bar i
11 Al Carlson. Prop. . .
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:: LIQUORS AND CIGARS ??
|| RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT X
Phone3-3-5 Juneau ..
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J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St. Juneau, Alaska
R. P. NELSON
Wholesale and Retail Dealer
in All Kinds
STATIONERY
Typewriting Supplies, Blank
Books, Office Supplies. Sporting
Goods. Huyler's Candies, Gun
ther's Candies. Toys, Notions,
Books, Magazines. Waterman's
Fountain Pens, Conklin Pens,
Etc.
Cor. 2nd. and Seward Sts.
Juneau, Alaska
Berry's Store
LADIES' GOODS
Arriving on Every Boat for
Every Occasion
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| The Alaska Grill ?
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^ The^Best Appointed r
i Place in Town +
t Best of Everything Served I
T at Moderate Prices *
i I
II I I I I I I H II I I t I ! I 1 I H -#.
THE BEST LOAF OF
1 BREAD
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2 Is Sold At *
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? San francisco Bakery |
? G. MESSERSCHMIDT, Prop. |
.;
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
?
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK, Vice-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
F. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
Slow it is Proposed to
Save Country Millions
>
>
; WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. -The hear
ings on tariff which are being con
, ducted by the Ways and Means Com
mittee have not been completed but
as soon as they are over the Com
mittee will prepare the measure to be
passed at the special session of Con
gress, which will replace the pres
ent Payne-Aldrich law.
It is asserted by Chairman Under
wood and his Democratic colleagues
on the committee that a revision of
the chemical schedule along the lines
of the bill passed by the House last
year will save American consumers
$17,000,000, and will at the same time
increase the revenue to the Govern
ment. It is the plan of the commit
tee to levy low rates of duty upon
non-competitive articles produced in
this country, especially the chemicals
used In the textile industry and
chemicals and drugs used for medi
cines.
H. J. Krebs, President of the Krebs
Pigment and Chemical Company, of
Newport, Del., protested against any
change in the present chemical sche
dule. and he was suported in his con
tention by It. A. McCormick of Balti
more. Louis L. Brigham of the Brig
ham Sheet Gelatin Company of Ran
dolph. Vt.. wanted relief from the pres
ent chemical tariff, claiming that it
was not scientifically adjusted. He
held up specimens of his own and for
eign gelatin and protested that there
was today just as much duty on raw
materials as for the finished product.
He contended that this arrangement
put him on the same basis as the for
eign gelatin manufacturers. He told
the committee that double the present
duty on the finished product should be
fixed in the proposed gelatin tariff.
T. F. Scholkopf of Buffalo contended
that the proposed reduction of the
duty on coal tar dyes, or colors, of
which about $7,000,000 worth annually
are brought to this country, would op
erate unjustly to the American in
dustry.
George Simon, representing the
Hyde Chemical Company of New York,
stated that a slycilic acid trust existed !
in Europe, and that if the duty was re-;
Uuced on this product American manu
facturers would be at the mercy of
this trust. lie said it would be im
possible to make this acid if any re
duction was made.
William A. White of the Eastern
Chemical Works of Hartford, Conn.,
said that manufacturers of gallic and
pyrogallic acids would 'have to aban
don their manufacture if any reduc
tion in the duty was made.
"It would result in competition with
Germany," said Mr. White. He ad
mitted, however, that within five years
this industry would need little or nol
protection whatever.
Charles Delaney of Philadelphia,
manufacturer of glue and gelatin, told
the committee that he welcomed a I
cut in the tariff on his products. He
did not believe it would hurt the in-l
dustry in the least, he said, as the I
price of glue and gelatin is already
so low. He said the United States I
produced more glue than any other!
country in the world. Mr. Delaney I
said his company also manufactured I
curled hair.
"What's your side line?" he was
asked.
"Curling hair," he replied.
"You'll find the gentleman from
Kentucky a pretty good customer," in
terjected Representative Longworth I
of Ohio, while Senator-elect James of
Kentucky, a bald-headed member of
the committee, who loveB a joke re-l
torted:
"Did you say straight hair? If
you did, I should like to buy some for
my own use."
Mr. Dorian, Treasurer of the Amer
ican Graphaphone Company, of Hart
ford. Conn., favored keeping shelac
and copal gum on the free list. He
was questioned by Representative Kit
chin as to the capital stock of his
company.
"My company is capitalized at $10,
000.000," he replied. "Last year we
paid 7 per cent dividends."
"How much of this stock is 'wa
tered'?" Mr. Kitchin asked.
"This is not a proper question for
the committee to ask me," replied Mr.
Dorian, displaying some feeling, "and
I refuse to answer it."
New York Stock Exchange
i Confers With Gov. Sulzer
NEW YORK, Jan. 31. - The New
York Stock Exchange has appointed
a committee to confer with Governor
Sulzer over proposed legislation, fol
lowing the Governor's special message
to the legislature? urging supervision
and regulation of the Exchange.
The members of the Stock Ex
change express little doubt that it is
the purpose of Governor Sulzer to
pa> particular attention to the con
duct of the Stock Exchange, nor have
they any doubt that the majority of
the members of the Legislature will
be in smynathy with his undertaking
! in the way of reform.
One of the leading members of the
Stock Exchange admitted that indica
tions pointed to the passage by the
Legislature of a bill to bring the op
erations of the Stock Exchange under
the supervision of the State. Some of!
the members are said to indorse this
project .f it can be accomplished with
out damage to the legitimate business
conducted on the Stock Exchange.
These men believe that it will be
possible to eradicate many of the
evils disclosed by the report of the
Hughes commission and revealed by
the ollicials and members of the Ex
change who testified before the Pujo
committee. It is this element in the
Exchange which favors a peaceful ad
justment of the contrversy which is
certain to follow the introductions
of bills to incorporate the Stock Ex
change and to forbid "wash sales,"
"margin trading," "short selling,"
"pyramiding," and other practices
which have brought the Exchange in
to disrepute.
The purpose of the members of the
legislature to compel the necessary
reforms has been clearly established
by declarations already made by leg
islators.
To Place a Ban on
The Traffic in Opuim
WASHINGTON. Jan. 31.?Represen
tative Francis Burton Harrison, of
New York, has taken steps to have
enacted at this session of Congress a
Federal Anti-Narcotic law which will
make the United States one of the
leading nations to place a ban on the;
traffic in opium, cocaine and other
drugs of similar nature. As Chair
man of the sub-committee of the Ways
and Means Committee to which was
referred Mr. Harrison's bill, which
he introduced he held a hearing yes
terday.
Dr. Hamilton Wright of the State
Department, who represents the
United States in the international com
~m mission upon the opium trade, an
nounced that the Netherlands had
called on international conference for
June 1, and he pointed out the desir
ability of having a Federal Anti-Nar
cotic law on the books before that
time, especially, he said, since the
United States had been a leader In
the movement, but had so far failed
to enact a law for itself.
Representatives of the National As
sociation of Retail Druggists, the
American Pharmaceutical Association,
the National Association of Manufac
turing Chemists and the American
Medical Association were present.
Dr. William C. Woodward. Health
Officer of the District of Columbia,
representing the American Medical As
sociation, objected to the bill on the
ground that it would impose a tax of
$1,000,000 a year upon the ohysicians
of the United States.
Mr. Harrison replied that unscru
pulous physicians are said to be the
chief cause of the spread of the drug
habit. He said physicians in high
standing would not object to the tax
of $5 a year, which the bill provides,
if it would rid the profession of those
members who abuse thei.- p.\. lieges
as physicians by dispensing opium,
cocaine and such drugs to victims of
the "dope habit."
The bill provides that on and after
July 1, every person handling opium,
morphia, ccca leaves, cocaine, their
salts, derivatives or preparations,
shall register with the Collector of
Internal Revenue of the district, his
name or style, place of residence and
place of business. An annual tax
of $5 for retailers, which includes
physicians, and $100 for importers, ex
porters, manufacturers, jobbers and
wholesalers, is provided.
FINDS FOSSIL OF HUMAN
IN ROCK FORMATION
WAGON WHEEL GAP, Colo., Jan.
30^?The skeleton of what was evi
dently a human being has been found
here forty feet below the surface of
the ground In a solid rock formation.
The skeleton, which apparently has
been sealed in the rocks for thousands
of years, was In an nlniost perfect state
of preservation.]
The discovery, which may prove a I
most important one in aiding scien-l
tists to learn more about the early in-J
habitants of this continent, was made
by Ellwood Bergey, a mining man of'
this section, who was driving a shaft'
on some mining property and hand j
gone about forty feet, most of the:
way through a solid rock formation.
A charge of dynamite set off in the
bottom of the shaft exposed in the
side walls a small fissure about six
feet long and one foot wide, which
was tightly sealed with rock and talc
formations.
Within this silent and long buried
tomb the fossil was found.
The discovery isexciting much lo
cal interest and the skeleton is on ex
hibition here. It is small, but seems
too strongly built to be that of a child.
WOULD-BE BRIDE OF 105 ji
TO WED GROOM OF 80
LOS ANGELES, Calif.,?Jan.31 ?
Mrs. Marcellena Elizelda, aged 105,
years, and reputed to be wealthy, was ;
granted a license to wed Pleasantino ?
Leon, aged 80. She concurred in the !
application and when the license was '
issued, Leon anounced he would seek <
to have a recent court order which .
appointed Mrs. Claude Lugo, a grand
daughter, the legal guardian of the
aged woman set aside. Mrs. Lugo
said today she would contest his ef
forts.
?I I I I I"I 1 I I M I 1 I I I I I I !
| The Unique Millinery ?
| LADIES'
| FURNISHINGS J
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
j
| F. Wotad i
: Tailor |
j Phone 66 SECOND ST. |
III! ? I II !??? OTT" r ?limf ? I??T??
C W. YOUNG COMPANY
Dealers in
Mining, Fishing, Plumbing
and Building Supplies
Front Street Juneau
PETERSBURG ~FISH CO.
All Kinds of
FRESH AND SALT FISH
CLAMS AND CRABS
All Orders Promptly Filled
PETERSBURG ALASKA
f THE CIRCLE CITY HOTEL f
{ MRS. M. E. BERGMANN, Prop. f
f HEADQUARTERS for PROSPECTORS AND MINING MEN I
ELECTRIC LIGHTED STEAM HEATED J
t THIRD STREET JUNEAU, ALASKA f
"America's Finest Flouring Mills"
yy/ Plant and Product
?fjr one and, insepa?'able
V / Pronounced by experts "America's Finest Flouring
J Mills," the plant of the Fishkr Flouring Mills
f Company, was designed and constructed to produce
America's Most Efficient Breadstuff,
Fishers Blend Flour
Separate machinery is provided for grinding hard and soft
wheat. Kvery grain is washed in the famously pure Cedar
River water and thoroughly dried before being ground.
It is no Ullc Doast to say mat mis
product is the cleanest, most scien
tifically blended, most economical
llour ofTereil for sate today. Coinbin
ins as it docs Eastern Hard Wheat
and Western Soft Wheat, it gives to
public and private bakeries a ma
terial which has all the advantages
of hoth hard and soft wheat flours,
is better than cither, and decidedly
superior to any other blend hereto
fore produced.
One price at all dealers
Pusher's BLEND
^ -
DO YOU TAKE IT?
lU ; . ; . . '. m
The Daily Empire publishes all the news, all the time
IT IS CLEAN, UP-TO-DATE, PROGRESSIVE
One Dollar per Month Delivered by Carrier in Juneau, Douglas and Treadwell
'
TRY IT AND YOU WILL KEEP IT
/
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