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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 01, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912 at the postolfico at Ju- j
?eau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
0.?e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU, ALASKA. SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 1. 1913.
A GRATIFYING REPORT
THE very excellent and complete report of the "commerce
and customs business" of Alaska for the year 1912, which is
just at hand from the othce of Collector of Customs J. R.
Willis, makes a gratifying showing. The report states: "Al
though there was no material increase in the population of Alas
ka during the calendar year 1912, the commerce of the territory
broke all former records in almost every particular."
The total trade was twenty-seven per cent higher than for
any previous year, while the balance of trade in favor of Alaska
was the largest of record, amounting to nearly twenty million
dollars. It is further shown that for the first time in the his
tory of the Territory both the shipments of merchandise from
the United States and from Alaska, passed the twenty million
mark. Another matter of more than passing interest?especial
ly to the people of Southeastern Alaska?is the statement that
the shipments to this section "show an enormous increase, and
are more than double those of any of the other three divisions?
due to the increase of salmon canneries and the extensive de
vlopment of mining properties in the Juneau district."
Alaska, until within a recent time, has been known princi
pally for her production of gold and furs, and gold constituted
the great proportion of the Territory's exports; and, as the re
port states, though greater in 1912 than for the two previous
years, it was fifty per cent less in value than the total of the
other Alaska products shipped to the United States and was ex
ceeded by the single item of salmon?canned and otherwise pre
served.
These statements are more than ordinarily interesting and
are significant as well. They show a wonderful expansion of the
sa'mon cannery business and accentuate the necessity existing
for the proper conservation of this valuable food fish by the
enforcement of sane regulations and the artificial propagation
of the species. Salmon is a much too important asset of the Ter
ritory to permit the depletion of these waters.
The production of gold indicates an upward tendency and it
is safe to say that the low water mark in the mining of Alaska
gold has been reached, and the coming years will note a steady
increase, due to the extensive development of quartz and the in
troduction of dredges to handle the immense low grade alluvial
deposits of Seward peninsula and the interior country.
The steady increase in the output of copper also shows the
advance that Alaska is making in this important industry.
The careful and methodical work of Collector of Customs
Willis and his efficient staff, is worthy of commendation. The
statistics presented have been carefully compiled and they will
be of large benefit to the Territory at large, as they typify in
a concrete way the strides that Alaska is making industrially
and commercially.
A fatal accident last night was narrowly averted when an
alley broke and dropped several people, including a number of
women and children, into the tideflats below Fortunately the
tide was out and no one was drowned. But it was a most un
pleasant and unnecessary experience, and is such as to call for an
investigation. There is a blameworthiness somewhere.
AN URGENT NECESSITY.
THAT there is no provision made by the Government for pay
ing the necessary expenses that must be incurred in effect
ing quarantine and caring for the afflicted, in case of an ep
idemic of contagious diseases in Alaska, is as deplorable as it is
true. The Government cannot be blind to the fact that such a
condition exists. As a matter of fact it is not. Representations
have been made time and again to Washington, but without re
sult. A little more than a year ago the town of Eagle maintained
a quarantine against Dawson, where smallpox was prevalent,
and the town after exhausting its own treasury made an appeal
for financial help from other towns of the Yukon country. The
United States officials rendered all the aid they could, but a fed
eral official in Alaska is not a national bank, and if he were to
respond to every appeal to his purse, his diet would soon be re
duced to straight beans.
Following the Eagle quarantine small-pox appeared among
the natives at Fort Yukon and on the Porcupine river, in Can
ada. The Yukon territorial government immediately dispatched
a relief steamer with medical and other supplies, and instituted a
strict quarantine and the disease was soon stamped out. On the
American side the missionaries and other white people did the
best they could until the epidemic was abated.
Common humanity, to say nothing of common decency, de
mands that permanent provision be made for effecting a prompt
quarantine in such cases, and to do this a fund must be created
and placed at the disposal of the federal authorities in each ju
dicial division.
The diphtheria outbreak at Sitka and Hoonah serves to em
phasize the urgent need of some adequate means to meet an
emergency of this kind. The territorial legislature would do well
to memorialize the Congress and endeavor to obtain relief from
an intolerable condition.
RECALL OF PRESIDENTS
Mr
IF WE are to have the recall of judges and other elective of
ficials, why should the President of the United States be ex
empt ? He holds his office by the will of the people, the same
as a county coroner or a justice of the peace; and if the lesser
officials are made subject to recall the President should take his
chance with the rest of the elect. The recall of officials may have
its virtues; we know it has its faults, and in the cases to which
it has been applied, and which have come to our knowledge, it
has not been an unmixed blessing. When a dishonest or incom
petent man attains ollice the operation of the recall system can
be made to meet his case, but it has been worked overtime by
people who have had nothing better to do. A number of cities
have adopted it, and so has the State of California, and it will
no doubt in time be reduced to a simple workable quantity. Some
thing that it now lacks.
111111111111II1111II111 i 1111111 III I> j
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home !!
? Nothing adds more to the attractiveness of the home than , ,
n well-appointed table. It helps to mukc the homo the place , ,
home oiiKht to be. And you would ho surprised, perhnps. , ,
how much it adds to the positive relish of the ineal. Wo , ,
make it easy for you to supply your home?little by little, if , ,
you like?with n tasteful pattern of silverware. , ,
These Koods art; up-to-date and most reliable of any made , ,
Come and See Our Look for the Trade Mark l ,
Silverware Department ?'
GORHAM CO. i
? 11111111
I I I 1 I 'I i'l I'M I'M I I III MM H-l
:: Alaska News Notes ;;
?i -i i ; i i i i I i 1 I i i 1 i I i H 1 1 i I l ?
J. A. Jacobsen an old time prospec-1
tor of th j Copper river country, had
the misfortune to freeze his feet bad-!
ly on the Chestocliina.
* ? ?
1\ \V. Brwin, father of Judge 0. B.,
Krwln, of Fairbanks, died recently in,
Omaha.
? ? ?
Commissioner Albrocht, of Iditarod, i
recently fined three men $250 each
for running a gambling game.
? ? ?
Seven soldiers were arrested at St. i
Michael in December for criminally
assaulting a native woman. They
broke into her shack, took the wom
an and her baby and 15-ycar old daugh
ter out on the ice in the bay. The girl
succeeded in escaping. The baby was
thrown into the snow. Only three of
the soldiers were identified.
? ? ?
Hydraulicking on Mastodon creek,
Circle district, Pete Anderson last fall
worked for 30 days, with a night and
day crew of five men each and netted
$1,000 a day.
? ? ?
A. G. Peterson, an aged Fairbanks
rancher, died at that place recently.
? ? ?
J. A. Cameron, United States com
missioner at Circle City, has been in
dicted by a grand jury as the result
of a fight between squawmen and
bootleggers. It is believed by many
that the grand jury has been imposed
upon.
? ? t
The ten-stamp mill at Chcna is re
ported to be running day and night.
? ? ?
A fire in Seward destroyed the home
of the Daykiu family and damaged the
Wayne Blue home. Mrs. Day kin and)
daughter were burned about the face,
but not seriously.
? ? 9
Joseph Geraghty, supposed to have
been murdered In the Chandlar coun
try several years ago, by Indians, is
said to be alive on the Arctic coast,
near Herschel island, where he is liv
ing with the natives.
? 9 9
Tom Aitken, the Iditarod mining
man, reputed to be worth a million,
walked into the marshal's office at
Valdez, and paid a debt of $92 for
Jack Connolly, who had been arrest
ed there on a complaint from Fair
banks. Aitken some years ago signed
a check for $600,000 for Frank Man
ley, when some interior bankers were
trying to squeeze Manley out of some
valuable ground.
The Fidalgo Mining Co. made its
first shipment of ore to the Tacoma
smelter a few days ago. The ore runs
about $20 to the ton. The mine is in
the Valdez section.
? ? *
Friends of United States Marshal H.
P. Sullivan, of Valdez, have circulated
a petition asking that he be retained
in office under the Wilson administra
tion.
INDIANS ARE CARRYING
PLEA T6 WASHINGTON
The Prince of Wales, the present
Chief of the Clallam tribe of Indians,
who have been homeless and landless
since 1855, has started from Seattle
for Washington. D. C., to present to
Congress and to the Interior Depart
ment the Indian's petition for redress
of grievances which they have en
dured nearly fifty-eight years.
In 1855 a treaty between the In
dians and the government was ratified
under the terms of which the Indians
were to surrender their hereditary
lands lying between Cape Flattery
and Hoods Canal for 2,840 acres near
Point No Point, in Washington State.
The Indians vacated their lands, but
when they arrived at their new hunt
ing ground, found it had been given
to another tribe.
Repeated appeals have failed to
get the return of their old homes or
the assignment of new lands, it is al
leged, and now the Prince of Wales
is on his way to make a last appeal
to the Great White Father.
The treaty on which the Clallams
base their position was signed Jan.
26, 1855, by the Duke of York, the
Prince of Wale's predecessor, and fif
ty sub-chiefs for the Indians by Gov.
I Isaac I. Stevens, for the government.
CHURCH NOTES.
Methodist Episcopal.
K. C. Blackwell, Pastor
Services morning and evening at 11
and 7:30 o'clock. Sunday School at
12 in. Young People's Meeting at
6:30. Meeting of the Official Board,
Thursday evening. Meeting of the
Tuesday evening. Prayer meeting,
Woman's Social Union Friday after
noon at 2:30 at the home of Mrs. i
Dickinson.
Presbyterian Church
John B. Stevens, Pastor.
Morning service at 11, subject "The
Distinctive Feature of Christian
Faith." Evening service at 7:30, sub
ject. "The Relation of Environment
to Responsibility." Special music by
male choir. Sunday School meets at
12 m. The Ladies' Guild will meet
at the manse on Friday afternoon at
2:30.
Trinity Episcopal.
Tomorrow being the first Sunday
of the month there will be Holy Com
munion at 8:00 a. in. Sunday School
at 12:30. Evening prayer and sermon
at 7:30. Rev. G. E. Renison will
preach the first of a special series of
l.enten sermons beginning tomorrow
evening, subject, "The Power of a
Religious Life." Everyone is cordial
ly welcome. Ladies' Guild meeting
on Thursday at 2:30. Choir practice
Thursday evening at 7:30.
Christian Science
Chirstian Science service is held in
the Christian Science hall, Sunday, at
11 a. m., subject "Love." The public
is welcome. Sunday School is held at
12:30. Literature and information of
Christian Science can be had at the
reading room on Wednesdays from
two to five.
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka?
8:00 a. m., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29, Jan. 4, 10,
16, 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21, 27.
March 5. 11. 17. 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. IT,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4. 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3. 9. 15, 21, 27. Dec. 3,
9. 15, 21, 27. Jan. 2, 8, 14, 20.
26. Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19, 25, March
3, 9, 15. 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
.
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
L
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW !
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska 1
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor *
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
1 ?
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau - Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY !
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash. j
I
I
I
1
The Empire
for I
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plusg
Printers that Know
Equal|
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone|3-7-4
?
I
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Almtkn Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The AU.ika Flyer
NORTHBOUND JAN. 22
SOUTHBOUND JAN. 23
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ollice, 716 Second Ave. GEO. BURFOKD, Agent
TTT'I -I I I I 1 I 1 I I 1 1 1 I I I 1 I-H-H -l-l-Jh
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO. I
! STEAM KKS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, PETERS- -
! BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY
JEFFERSON Northbound JAN. 26 Southbound JAN. 27 *
i ALAMEDA " JAN. 29 1
; NORTHWESTERN Westbound JAN. 30 ;*
? MARIPOSA " FEB. 1 Southbound FEB. 7 "?
Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through
C tickets to San Francisco. I
j- ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. ?
. iiimT
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastServicc
Sailing from Juneau for I'ort Simp?on. Prince Rupert, Swnniton, Alert Hay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY JAN. 31
Front nn<! Sewnrtl Sts. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T SPICKETT. Atrt. |
^ h 11 h 111 i 1111111111111111111111 n i n 111111 h 1111111
ij ALASKA COAST CO, ;i
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdcz, Latouche, Seward, ?.
! Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU !!
!! S. S. YUKON - - - FEBRUARY 14 I I
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA "
[ I connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports ] \
'? S. S. YUKON - ? - ? FEBRUARY 4 ?
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice.
> ? a ?
For further information apply to
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle ? ?
U i i IHIH 1 1 H I i I I ! I I i I M I II I I M I I I I I I I I I II M I I I I I I II
* PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. \
* STEAMERS FOR ?
SKATTI.K, TACOMA, ?
^ Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, *
* South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco, ^
? Anacortcs, Los Angeles and San Diego. J
% C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. ?
? 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle +
? Q C NORTHBOUND FEB. 4 ?
? Curacao southbound feb. 5 ?
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. ^
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU, DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Douglas and
Trcndwcll
: 00 a. IK.
9:00 a. n:.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. in.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. ni.
11:00 i) m.
Lv. Trend
well for
Juneau
*8:25 a. ra.
9:25 a. ra.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. ra.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m.
11:25 n. m.
leaves
Douglas for
Juneau
?8:30 a.m. I
9:30 a.m. J
12:05 p. m. 1
1:45 p.m. j
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p.m. 1
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
leaves Juneau ilaily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. rn.
5:10 p. ra.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Suturd: y Nitrht Only
\ llTOOp.m
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. m.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. m.
lay Schedule Mine :i a!*-.1. ??. ?-\r.?pf t rip l?'avimr .? uru-ac al > :t. in.
?H-l I !? lMI"i"I"l' I11 I' I' I I I I I I I I 'I -I'S-H-H-H- II 1 M I I 1 M H 1 I I i 1 1 M-H
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX
Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Plan j
;; COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME !!
~ FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA "
?i'l 1 I11 J '1 ?M-Hiil"l"Ii! 1"I"1..1"I..H"F-H"l-1-|H|M-I"M M|M I I 1 1-M I M-I
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
?????. I
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
? <.
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREAOWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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