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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 04, 1913, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. 1. NO. 7S. JUNEAU, ALASKA. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4,1913. PRICE TEN CENTS
FISHER'S DOG-IN-THE-MANGER POUCY
(
A Chain of Wireless
Stations to San Francisco
According to Sidney Smith, of the
Algunican Development Company, the
Marconi Company contemplates in
stalling a perfect and complete chain
of stations all along the Pacific Coast
-a system that will gi\e uninterrupt
ed service between Alaska points. San
Francisco, Seattle. Portland and Van
couver.
The Algunican Development Com
pany co-operates with the Marconi
Company in maintaining a 5-kilowat
station at Jualin at the present time.
It is the intention of the Marconi
Company to install six or eight more
stations in the North. There will be
one at Yakutat. another at Chicha
gotf. probably one at Skagway. or
Haines.
The plant at Juneau Is to be in
creased from its present inefficient
capacity to a 5- or lt)-kilowat station.
There has been a lot of unjust crit
icism by uninformed persons about
the management of the Juneau station
Mr. Smith thinks th?- fault is in the
station not the operation. The other
day the Jefferson was attempting to
let Juneau know of her approach. Ju
neau heard the Jefferson all right, but
the Jefferson could not hear Juneau.
However. Jualin did hear Juneau and
picking up Juneau's reply to the Jef
ferson. sent it to the ship. But Ju
! wan was not able to hear Jualin and
kept repeating the answer to the Jef
ferson's notice until the JefTerson
made known that the answer was re
ceived through Jualin. The other day
there was an accident at Jualin. The
story was sent to Juneau?Prince Ru
: pert got it but Juneau failed to re
spond. This demonstrates that the
Juneau station is inefficient both for
receiving and sending.
The plants at Petersburg will un
doubtedly be enlarged and there will
probably be one built at Wrangell.
It is planned to establish stations
all along the coast until the chain is
complete. The commercial rate will
be made much lower than the present
cable rates, but whether or not there
will be a press rate has not been an
nounced.
Mr. Smith is enthusiastic over the
prospect of getting direct communica
tion from the isolated mining camps
like Jualin. with the outside world.
The prospect should also appeal to
the Alaska business men. The prom
ise of direct communication, not only
with the large commercial cities of
the States, but with their customers
at a distance from the trade centers
should be welcomed by all Alaska bus
iness men. The proposed enterprise
will probably receive universal encour
agement.
Abstract of the Decision
in Whorf Coal Land Case
The local land office is in receipt
of the decision of the department of
the interior in the case of \V. G.
Whorf. who made a coal land entry
at i'ort Graham on February S. lt*10.
for 05.101 acres. The land in ques
tion is situated in the Cook inlet re
cording district. Juneau land district
and the entry was based on a notice
of location made by Whorf April 26.
19"5. under the provisions of the act
of April 2S.1904.
From an investigation of the en
try made by the field service of the
general land otlice it developed that
Louis Levy claimed an undivided one
half interest in the entry on account
of a "grubstake" agreement between
himself and Whorf. entered into Jan.
IT. 1903. and also on account of a lo
cation of a portion of the area in ques
tion. with other ground, made by
Whorf in 1903, which purported loca
tion. however, was later, and prior to
the present location abandoned. It
was also suggested that one Jules
Redelsheimer was interested to some
extent in said entry. The land office
directed that proceedings be had in
the case in accordance with the cir
cular of Jan. 9. 1911. on the charges
that Whodf did not locate and file
upon the land embraced in his entry
in good faith: that the entry was made
pursuant to an unlawful agreement
with Levy; that prior to the applica
tion for patent Whorf sold and re
leased. by quit claim, deed dated
July 29. 1907. to Jules Redelsheimer,
the land embraced in the entry and
thereafter, in violation of law, filed
application for patent in his own
name.
A hearing was had before the chief
of the field department, in Seattle.
Sept. IS. iyi2, at which Whorf, Kedel
sheirner. Levy, and other, testified.
The evidence adduced showed that
the only interest Kedelshelmer had
i in the claim is that of a mortgage, it
being shown that he loaned the money
. to Whorf which was used in paying
for the land and in developing and
equipping the claim.
Conceding, however, that the entry
was made in the interest of one or
both of said parties, it nevertheless
appears that each is qualified to
make entry under the coal land laws, j
The decision quotes from the case J
of the United States vs. Colorado An
thracite Company?"while the coal
land law does not expressly prohibit
an entry by one person for the bene
fit of another, it does limit the quan
| tity of land that may be acquired
thereunder by one person to 160 acres
and the quantity that may be acquired
i by an association of persons to 320
acres, and in exceptional instances,
640 acres."
The entry here in question em
braces but a trifle more than 65 acres
of land?less than might be entered
by an individual and necessarily less
than migbt be entered by an assocla
! tion of qualified individuals.
Under the circumstances it is not
necessary to give further considera
tion to the possible rights of Levy
or Redelsheimer in the premises,
; both being shown to be qualified en
trymeu under the coal land laws. The
claims asserted by Levy should come
before a court of equity. The de
partment believes that the entry
should be passed to patent in Whorf's
name. The decision is signed by Sam
uel Adams. First Assistant Secretary
1 of the Interior.
APPELLATE COURT
ON COAL ENTRY
For the information of the local
land Otflce a copy of the decision of
the Circuit Court of Appeals of the
Kight Circuit in the case of the
United States vs. the Home Coal and
Coke Company, and the Haldy Coal
Company, was r- ceived by the local1
offices yesterday.
The area invoiveu is coal lands in
Colo ;,do. The decision in effect holds
that an entry of a coal claiui may
be made by any person for the use
n.nd benefit of any other person qual
ified to make a coal land entry, the
only restriction being that of area
which must not exceed ICO acres, and
that the ostensible entrvman does not
?nak. the entry by any misrepresenta
tion or deceit or fraud as to the real
parth s in interest.
RECORD CRIMINAL
TRIAL TOR JUNEAU
The trial of l'ete Bicchieri yester
day on the indictment charging as
sault with a dangerous weapon was
finished in record time.
The case went to trial yesterday
morning at ten o'clock. The jury was
recureti and the evidence of the gov
ernment nearly all in by 12 o'clock.
Tn the afternoon the defense had fin
ished and the jury had the case by
five o'clock. An hour later the jury
brought in a verdict of guilty of sim
ple assault.
SOCCER NEXT SUNDAY
There will be a soccer game at
Douglas next Sunday between Tread
well and Juneau teams.
Kvery thing that will please a smok
er nay be found at BURFORD'S.
Quartz Strike
In Nevada
RENO, Nov., Feb. 4.?All Nevada
and the adjoining States, are in a
blaze of excitement over a fabulous
gold strike made near this city.
The strike was made at a new camp
called "Rochester." on Netzel moun
tain. not for from Reno.
A vein has been uncovered which
carries two hundred ounces, of silver
and four hundred dollars in gold to
the ton.
Prospectors, miners and all kinds
and conditions of men are rushing to
the camp.
RIBY LARGEST
YUKON CAMP
"Ruby City has five saloons, two
blacksmith shops, two bath houses,
two laundries, two shoemakers, a hos
pital. a" school, a machine shop, one
livery stable and one meat shop.
.Many old-time Klondikers and a good
many former Fairbanks people are
there.
"Prospecting is under way on the
creeks, but not many streams have
shown gold in paying <11 mtities. Long
creek is the best, and a number or
dumps are being taken out there this
winter," says a visitor to that sec
tion.
"Ruby is one of the largest towns
in the Yukon valley. It is the second
in size on the Yukon river, being
next to Dawson. Ruby might apolo
gize for not providing more places for
humanity to fight ofT the menace of
thirst. Its miserable showing with
only five saloons is a sad commentary.
Fairbanks has a few more, but they
are poorly patronized, and both towns
easily are outnumbered by old Daw
son and her twenty-four drink empor-j
iums now running full blast."
A. F. Engelhardt, license inspector
and collector for th Yukon Territory,
explains to the Dawson News that
Dawson has eight saloons and seven-1
teen hotels licensed to sell liquors, j
mtiking a total of twenty-five retail i
places. She also has two wholesale
houses. Roadhouses in N ukon 1 erri-1
torv are licensed to sell liquor in sum
mer.
On the Alaska side sale of liquor!
is permitted only in towns where a j
marshal is stationed. The Yukon has
an extensive police service not main
tained in Alaska.
COURT NOTES.
The case against Marv Boyle and
both the cases against N. Marino have
been put over until next term of
court.
Case of Pacific Coast Company vs.
John Bolster was continued to April
1. 1913.
Court Sustains Demurrer
After hearing the argument the
court sustained the demurrer to the
indictment.
Shackleford & Bayless, and Z. R.
Cheney, counsels for Joseph Weyer
horst, and Assistant District Attorney
Folsom argued the demurrer to the j
indictment charging the crime of may
hem.
AT THE ORPHEUM
"A String of Pearls." is really one
of the most attractive motion picture
dramas ever produced. It pleased the
Orpheum audience last night.
HOSPITAL NOTES.
Mrs. Gravrock was operated on to
day by Dr. Sloane at St. Anne's hos
pital.
Norman Erickson. the man operated
upon by Dr. Egginton several days
ago, is getting along fine and will
leave St. Anne's hospital about next
Friday.
ASH WEDNESDAY
CHURCH SERVICES
Tomorrow being Ash Wednesday,
there will be services in Trinity Epis
copal church, as follows: Holy Com
munion at 10 a. m.; evening prayer,
Litany and sermon at 8 p. m.
Everyone is cordially welcome.
There will be a short choir rehearsal
after the services in the evening, all
members of the choir are requested
to be present.
The Daily Empire delivered in Ju
neau, Douglas and Tread well for ?1.00
a month.
Fisher Convicted by
His Own Mouth
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4.?Secretary of the Interior
Walter L. Fisher was forced to admit today, before the
House Committee on Territories, that he had assumed a
dog-in-the-manger attitude in the matter of opening up
the Alaska coal fields.
Secretary Fisher intimated that this policy had been
pursued by him because of President Roosevelt's with
drawal of Alaska coal lands from public entry on Nov.
12, 1906
The admission of Fisher, which came as a thunder
bolt out of a clear sky, was forced from him by Repre
sentative Rufus Hardy, of Texas, in a hearing before
the committee, of a bill, introduced by Delegate James
V ickersham, of Alaska, and Senator Jones, of Washing
ton, to place the hearing of Alaska coal land claims be
fore a court of competent jurisdiction.
In the hearing Secretary Fisher opposed the bill.
He said that the courts would not be as liberal in their
interpretations as the Interior Department.
Appropriation For the
First Alaska Legislature
I
There is no room for further worry
over the expense account of the com
ing legislative session.
The Governor's oflice was yesterday
advis I of the passage by the Senate
oi the legislative, executive, and Ju
dicial appropriation bill containing, by
an amendment inserted in the meas
ure in the upper branch of Congress,
provision for the expense of the first
Alaska legislature.
The total appropriation for the pur
pose of meeting the expenses of the
first Maska legislature amounts to
>13,200. Of this amount $21,600 is set
aside for salaries of the members,
which allows $000 to each member.
The mileage, or transportation, ex
pense of the members is provided for
' to the amount of $6,500. An item of
' $5,160 is allowed for salaries to em
ployees of the legislature during its
session. The sum of $5,000 is set aside
to pay for the printing of laws. An
item of $2,000 is allowed to pay for
| rent of legislative halls and commit
tee rooms. The sum of $5,000 is pro
vided to pay for stationery, supplies,
and for the printing of bills, reports,
j etc.
The same beneral appropriation
bill makes provision for the support
of the Governor's olllce, but does not
increase the amount for that purpose,
although a larger amount is urgently
needed for clerk hire, in view of the
added duties of that office in connec
tion with the newly created legisla
. ture.
RATIFIES INCOME
TAX AMENDMENT
SANTE FE, N. M., Feb. 4. ? The ;
State Legislature yesterday afternoon
ratified the income tax amendment to
the Constitution of the United States.
Thirty-seven States have now ratified j
the amendment, one more than is act-,
ually required.
.J. P. TUMULTY TO BE \
PRES. WILSON'S SECRETARY
TRENTON, N. J., Feb. 4.?Presi- j
dent-elect Wilson announced last night1
that he had selected Joseph Patrick!
Tumulty as his secretary.
Tumulty lias been secretary to Gov
ernor Wilson ever since he was elect-]
ed Governor of New Jersey.
STAR SPANGLED BANNER
PROUDLY WILL WAVE
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4?Represen
tative Levy introduced a joint reso
lution making "The Star Spangled
Hanner" a national anthem. The bill
will pass both houses and become a
law at an early date.
QUARANTINE IS RAISED
Today .Marshal Faulkner received
word that the diphtheria quarantine
had been raised in Sitka.
TO JUNEAU PATRONS:
I wish to announce that I am pr?
pared to give prompt, and efficient
service in delivering, coal htiui:;:;
ir.ht, baggage, etc.
HILARY McKANNA TRANSFER
'hone Order 5-7 or 55 tf
DRESSMAKING?And sewing by
day. Miss Irene E. Smith: address H.
L. Summer's residence, or P. O. box
90. city. l-31-3t.
FOUND?Gentleman's scarf pin. In
quire Empire office. 2-1
Job Printing at The Empire Office.
RAISING MONEY I
TO HELP CHINA
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 4. ? The
Chinese residents of the principal
American cities are raising four hun
dred thousand dollars for the pur
pose of outfitting an army to protect
Chinese interest in Mongolia against
the encroachments of the Russians.
SPLENDID PROGRAM TO
BE RENDERED TONIGHT
The concert recital tonight whicn
will be given by Mrs. J. V. Davis, assist
ed by the best local talent, promises
to be a rare treat. .Mrs. Davis' abil
ity as a dramatic reader, is well at
tested, and besidee a delightful pro
gram has been prepared.
The program will be called at nine
o'clock this evening at Oddfellow's
hall.
INSANE MAN AT SITKA
The marshal's oflice has been ad
vised that a man in Sitka named Lee
was adjudged insane yesterday.
STANDS BY CHAPLAI N
SACRAMENTO, Calif., Feb. 4.?Pro
found (juiet greeted the reading in the
Assembly today of a resolution for
bidding the chaplain to pray for legis
lation pending before the House in
his invocations. It was placed on the
table, 40 to 30.
W. S. Killingsworth, who announced
yesterday, after Chaplain Franklin K.
Raker had included in his prayer a
plea for a Sunday closing act, that he
would offer such a resolution, at
tempted to explain his position, but
the motion to table cut ofT debate.
FOR RENT
HOGAN FLAT*; ? Four and five
room apartments, unfurnished.
l-28-6t. SOWERBY & BELL.
Phone your subscription to The
Daily Empire. Phone 3-7-4.
Heifner Talks of Alaska
With the President-tied
TRENTON, N. J., Feb. A. -Charles,
(5. Heifner, of Seattle, called on Pres
ident-elect Wilson yesterday afternoon
and had a lontf conference with Gov
ernor Wilson.
Mr. Heifner discussed the Alaska
situation with the President-elect, and
particularly with reference to the pol
icy to be pursued in opening up the
coal lands of Alaska, and conserva
tion.
President-elect Wilson said after the
conference that .Mr. Heifntr's mission
chielly to arrange for conlerences af
ter the inauguration.
Mr. Helfner was Governor Wilson's
personal representative on the Pacfic
Coast during his campaign for the
presidential election, and he Is said
to have the full confidence of the
President-elect.
Taft Inspects the Report
of Railroad Commission
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4.?President
Tnft worked all day yesterday in
specting the report of the Alaska Rail
road Commission. He made volumin
ous notes which will be used in the
preparation of a message which in;
will probably send to the Congress
during the current week.
it is understood t hat an soon as
President Taft's message in published
he will go over the situation with
President-elect Wilson.
A number of Alaskans, now in
Washington, will leave for Trenton
within a short time to have a talk with
Coventor Wilson, over matters relat
ing to the Territory.
BALKAN WAR HAS BEEN RESUMED
LONDON, Feb. 4. -The Constantino
ple correspondent of the Chronicle
telegraphs his paper that the Balkan
war has been resumed.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Feb. 4. It has
been officially announced that hostil
ities were resumed at seven o'clock
.ist night at Adrianople and Tchatalja.
Shortly after seven o'clock the Bal
kan allies opened the bombardment
upon Adrianople.
SOFIA, Bulgaria, Feb. 4. The bom
bardment of Adriauople began an
hour after the expiration of the armis
tice.
LONDON, Feb. 4. It hat been evi
dent that the allies were reluctant
to resort to a resumption of hostili
ties, probably due to their failure to
arrange the dilliculty with Koumania,
which it is believed, has not been set
tled.
RYAN IS RELEASED;
BAIL OE $70,0001
LEAVENWORTH, Kas., Feb. 4. ?
Frank M. Ryan, president of the In-1 j
tcrnatfonaI Union of Bridge and Struo
tural Ironworkerr' one of tlie convict- ,
ed dynamite conspirators, was re- j j
lci .d yesterday, hail having been j,
furnished to the amount of $70,000. |
REDUCTION OF PARCEL
POST CHARGES URGED
1
WASHINGTON, Feb. 3? Postmast- i <
er-General Hitchcock in a report sug- i
gests the reduction of parcel post
?harges and the increase of the
weight limit.
MIME. BERNHARDT
COMING TO ALASKA
?
PORTLAND, Ore., Feb. 4. ? "De
lighted," exclaimed Sara Beanhardt, |
tiie veteran French actress, when shej
was informed that Juneau and Ket
chikan. and Prince Rupert, B. C\, had |
all made bids for her appearance in
those towns.
Madame Berhardt added she would
go to Alaska and fill a series of per
formances as soon as she had closed
her engagement in San Francisco.
FAMOUS NOVELIST IS
DEAD IN ENGLAND
ST. PAUL, Minn., Feb. 4.?A cable
gram received here announces the
death of Anne Warner French, the
well-known American novelist. Mrs.
French died at a winter resort in the
south of England.
GENERAL OROZSCO IS
REPORTED AS BEING DEAD
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 4.?Dispatches
from Northern Mexico says that Gen
ral Pascual Orozsco. jr., the rebel
leader, is dead. It is believed here
that the report is authentic. Hies wife,
who resides here has not heard from
him in seven months.
A SNAP!
FOR SALE ?One 3%-inch Studa
baker wagon, gear only. ALSO, one
black mare, seven years old. Inquire
FEMMER & RITTER l-28-6t.
LAW TO COLLECT
THE INCOME TAX
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4.?Democrat
ic leaders in Congress say that a bill
Kill be passed at the special session
af Congress making provision for the
levying of an Income tax in compli
ance with the terms of the constitu
tional amendment which lu.s received
the ratification of the States.
WASHINGTON, Fob. 4. ?It is an
nounced that Pesident Taft will pro
claim the income tax amendment as
a part of the Constitution of the
United States, as soon as the State
Department receives ollicial notice
that it has been ratified by three
fourths of the States.
DELAWARE LIKEWISE
RATIFIES INCOME TAX
DOVER, Feb. 4.?The thirty-eighth
State to ratify the Income tax amend
ment to the federal constitution is
Delaware, the Legislature having rat
ified the amendment last night.
JACK JOHNSON TO
BE TRIED AT ONCE
CHCAGO, Feb. 4. ? United States
District Attorney James H. Wilkerson
lias announced that he will immediate
ly begin the prosecution of Jack John
son, under the Mann Act, or the
"white slave" law, as it is commonly
known. .
The District Attorney's decision to
prosecute Johnson, is th? result of
the decision of the United States Su
preme Court, affirming the decision
of the Court of Appeals which refused
to admit Johnson to bail.
ZAPATISTAS KILL TWENTY
FIVE MEXICAN SOLDIERS
MEXICO CITY, Feb. 4.?The follow
ers of General Zapata attacked a pas
senger train yesterday, bound for
Ozumba, killing twenty-five federal
soldiers.
FEMMER & RITTER
See this firm for all kinds of dray,
ing and hauling. We guarantee sat
isfaction and reasonable prices. Coai
delivered promptly. Feminer & Rit
ter's Express. Stand Burford's Cor
ner. Phone 314. Residence phones
402 or 403. ???

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