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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 04, 1913, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Entered as second class matter November 7, 1912 at the postollice at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1S79.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
O^e year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per mouth, delivered 100
JUNEAU. ALASKA. TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 4. 1913.
THE SIXTEENTH AMENDMENT
THE income tax amendment to the Constitution of the United
States having been ratified by the Legislatures of three
fourths of the States, is now a part and parcel of that his
toric document. It is the sixteenth amendment to the Constitu
tion. and the first added since 1870. Another will probably be
adopted within the next two years, this being an amendment
providing for the election of United States Senators directly by
the vote of the people. Both are distinctly progressive meas
ures. and are the result of long and patient work for popular
government.
The income tax amendment has occupied the attention of the
people of the United States for the past twenty-five years. A
law providing for the levying of an income tax was passed dur
ing Cleveland's second term, only to be declared unconstitutional
by the United States Supreme Court, by a bare majority of that
body. Indeed, it was charged at the time, and it has been re
peated many times since, that Judge Shiras changed his opin
ion overnight, when it was found that with it the constitutional
ity of the law would be upheld.
It is estimated that the operation of the law will produce
a revenue of one hundred millions dollars?a tidy sum that will
come from those who have and are much better able to spare
than the people upon whom the heaviest burdens of taxation now
fall. In other words, the rich will be compelled to contribute di
rectly to the national treasury, while the tariff tax will be lifted
to some extent from the shoulders of the great mass of people.
The prolonged fight against the adoption of an income tax
has been waged by entrenched wealth, and it is only within the
last few years that public opinion became sufficiently aroused
to force the passage of the proposed amendment by the Congress,
and compel its ratification by the requisite number of States.
A DETHRONED KING.
A HOBO is popularly supposed to be always on the alert for
a few dollars, if he can get it by the process known a*
"panhandling." But here is a national convention of so
called weary Willies, who have repudiated a hobo millionaire, or
a millionaire hobo, which you will. The Empire's dispatches
say that his hobo comrades deposed him from the presidency ol
their organization and ejected him from their meeting. The lot
of a hobo seems not to be a happy one. whether he be a million
aire like Mr. How. or the simulacrum of one like the veriest
Dusty Roads.
James Eads How is an eccentric individual who every once
in while has broken into print through his associations with
the "submerged tenth." Every winter in New York City he has
foregathered with the poor "down-and-outs" there to be found
in large numbers. But it has been alleged that his benefactions
toward their uplift consisted largely in organizing the hoboes
and in giving them brotherly advice, instead of satisfying the
cravings of empty stomachs. However, occasionally he provided
a dinner, always being sure that the newspapers were duly ap
prised of the affair and had representatives on hand to exploit it
"King of the Hoboes," he was called, but now, alack, he has
lost his title and there is no hobo so poor as to do him reverence
THE NEW IMMIGRATION LAW
THE principal changes in the immigration law, embodied ir
the new immigration bill, in addition to the literacy test
are these: An increase in the immigrant head tax from $-1
to $5. Exclusion of aliens not eligible for naturalization, a clause
which promises to bring considerable trouble in the near future.
Adoption of a literacy test. Making it permissible for the secre
tary of commerce and labor to decide in advance the matter
of the necessity for the importation of skilled contract labor.
Providing heavier penalties for the violation of the law on the
part of transportation companies. Providing machinery to com
pel the attendance of witnesses before the immigration author
ities Providing for the deportation of aliens who become crim
inals three years subsequent to their entry. Providing against
the illegal entry of criminals and stowaways. Permitting alien*
to be represented by counsel on appeals. Providing for matrons,
inspectors and surgeons on immigrant ships. Providing expert*
on insanity in the large ports of entry. A new definition of the
word "alien" where it appears in the law.
This law is of more than passing interest to the people of
the Pacific Coast and Alaska from the fact that with the open
ing of the Panama Canal, we will be brought more directly in con
tact with the immigration problem. Hitherto New York has
been the great port of entry for immigration, but with the open
ing of the canal to commerce, direct steamship lines from Euro
pean countries will furnish other avenues of entrance, and chief
among them will be Seattle and San Francisco.
THE DOWNFALL OF TURKEY
THE Turkish army is seething with revolt, we are told, be
cause of the assassination of Nazim Pasha, its commander
in-chief. But the real reason is deeper. It is because of the
submission of Turkey to the terms of the powers, which, how
ever. it has been unable to conclude, because delay is required
to reconcile the Turkish people to the inevitable. The fall of the
Turkish Cabinet because of its willingness to arrange terms of
peace with the Balkan allies was in line with recent precedents.
No Ministry can expect to survive the outbursts of popu
lar indignation if it fails in war. No Cabinet can hope for pop
ular gratitude when it submits under duress to humiliating con
ditions of peace. It was not only Napoleon's Ministry, but his
Empire that collapsed after Sedan. Turkey's army may seethe
with revolt, a turbulent populace that protests in the streets j
against peace may frighten Ministers into resigning, but they i
cannot give battle to victorious armies.
If Turkey does not yield much territory now it must yield
more later.
I
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I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I | II I I I I I I I I I I I I I
I'll I i I I 1 1 1 I-H-l-M-M I-MI1 IMI
:: Alaska News Notes jj
?!??!??! 1 I 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 111 1 I M l'M'M
Frank Carroll, a demented woodcut
tor, is missing at Beaver City, in the;
Yukon country.
* * ?
John L. Timmius is in Fairbanks
with a plan to establish a central pow
er plant for miners and others requir
ing electrical power. Mr. Timmins
claims to have unlimited financial
backing composed of New York and
London capitalists.
* * *
Charles T. Moore, a former resident
of Skagway, committed suicide recent
ly by throwing himself off the cliff
at Land'8 End, a rugged headland
near the Cliff House, San Francisco.
* * *
A pair of blooming pansies, grown
outdoors, and blossoming since the
recent warm rains, were picked in
the garden of Mrs. L. S. Keller, on
Jan. 29, according to the Skagway
Alaskan.
* * *
Louise Jacquote, of Kluane, has 25
) head of horses wintering in that coun
try. He cuts plenty of wild grass to
furnish hay for his stock during the
winter.
* * *
Garfield Thompson, a native of Ohio,
36 years old, attempted to suicide at
Ketchikan, while temporarily insane,
hv stabbing himself with a pen
knife.
? * ?
The Alaska Packers' Association
; put up 1,202,779 cases of salmon, and
V9SS barrels of salt salmon last year.
The A. P. A. operates fourteen can
neries in Alaska and one at Seiniah
' moo, Wash.
? * *
' C. P. Austin, the Iditarod manager
, of the Ouggenheims. who was in Fair
; >anks recently, refused to discuss the
I future plans which his company has
in mind.
? * ?
i National Bank Examiner Proctor re
cently completed the examination of
I the affairs of the First National ban];,
of Fairbanks, and reports the bank's
' business to be in good condition and
? the management to be very conserva
i tive.
* * *
Up to Christmas the weather at Pt.
Hope on the Arctic Ocean, has been
' the mildest ever known in that re
? gion.
$ $ $
Isadore and Sam Bayless, both well
known Alaskans, will open a depart
ment store in Iditarod next spring.
l Nome has 139 white children, which
were born in that town.
0 0 0
Alaska has 200 varieties of fish
having a commercial value.
* ? ?
T. W. Gaffney and Frank A. Aid
? rich, representatives-elect from the
Second Division, who are members of
the Nome Miners' Union, were ban
queted by organized labor the night
before their departure for Juneau.
? ? ?
The Newsboy mill, in the Fairbanks
district, is still pounding away on good
ore from its own mine, but as there
may not be enough rock on hand to
1 keep it busy, the mill will probably
> be used as a customs mill by near-by
. quartz prospectors. Hudson Bros, ex
pect to start their mill on Ester wlth
. in a month.
0mm
It is reported in Tanana that the out
put from the Indian river district,
Koyukuk, last year, amounted to $30,
O00?as compared with $13,000 last
season.
? ? ?
While dog-racing as a sport has nev
er been very popular in Fairbanks,
dog fanciers are trying to arrange
a series of races. There are several
crack teams in the Fairbanks dis
trict, and good sport is expected.
RAY BEAT BALDWIN
BY 118 VOTES
The returns from all precincts of the
Third Division have been received
and tabulated at Valdez. The success
fu contestants received the following
vote.
For Senator?B. F. Millard. 887; L.
V. Ray 910, the latter defeating Geo.
E. Baldwin by 118 votes.
For Representative?H. B. Ingram,
856: R. D. Gray, 902, Milo Kelly, 1,
055; F. M. Boyle, 793.
BIG CONTRIBUTIONS TO !
CAMPAIGNS UNDER BAN
WASHINGTON, Feb.4.?A drastic
bill to prohibit corporations from
making contributions in connection
with political elections was passed by
the Senate today. It also limits the
amount that may be donated by in
dividuals.
A special clause makes it unlawful
for any national bank or other corpor
ation organized by authority of law
to "contribute any money or other
I thing of value in connection with any
! convention, primary or other election
j for the nominations or election of any
! person to any political olllce."
It is provided in another clause that
it sha'l be "unlawful for any corpo
! ration whatever to contribute any i
j money or other thing of value in con
nection with the nomination of elect
ors for President and Vice-President,
or the nomination of President. Vice
President. Senator or Representative
in Congress."
The penalty is a fine not exceed
ing $5,000. Every director, officer or
agent who consents to the contribu
tion of a corporation in violation of
the act shall be liable to a fine of not
more than $1,000 or imprisonment for
not more than one year, or both.
No individual must contribute more
than $5,000 unless he be a candidate
for President, Vice-President, Sena
tor or Representative. Any individ
ual making a contribution in violation
i of this stipulation is liable to a fine of
i not more than $10,000. imprisonment
of two years or both fine and impris
onment.
The bill now goes to the House.
A three-story, concrete building will
be erected at once by the Tongass1
Trading Company, at Ketchikan.
FOR REN^ ? F:ve-room house un j
furnished. Inquire of Juneau Dairy tf
?
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route ? Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum,
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka -
S: 00 a. m? Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29.
Doc. 5, 11, 17. 23. 29. Jan. 4. 10,
16. 22, 28, Feb. 3, 9, 15, 21. 27,
March 5. 11, 17, 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham, 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11. Jan. 4. 28, Feb. 21,
March 17.
Leaves Juneau for Tvee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23, Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau ? Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor,
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station. Jualin, EL
dred Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3, 9, 15. 21. 27. Dec. 3.
9, 15, 21. 27. Jan. 2, 8, 14. 20,
26, Feb. 1, 7, 13, 19. 25, March
3, 9, 15. 21, 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau .... Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Mining and Corporation Law
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
jTtie Empire
for g
Job Printing
Good Stock
Plus
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
Unexcelled Printing
MAIN STREET
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. I
The Aluaka Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The Alanka Fly<T
NORTHBOUND
SOUTHBOUND
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle OHicc, 716 Second Ave. GKO. BURFOHD, A>,'ent
r l 1 1 1 1 M I ?l-H- I -I -I-JU
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO. f
I! STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN. WRANGEL, PETERS- t
" BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, IIAINES AND SKAGWAY T
JEFFERSON Northbound. .. .JAN. 26 Southbound ....JAN. 27 X
ALAMEDA " JAN. 29 I
;; NORTHWESTERN Westbound JAN. 30 j;
*' MARIPOSA " ....FEB. 1 Southbound ....FEB. 7 -j
Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through X
tickets to San Francisco. X
f ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt. |
I *r "I*
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastServiic
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpaon. Prince Rupert, Swunaon, Alert Hay, Vancouver
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 13
Front and Seward St a. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICK ETT. Aid. J
-H-H 1 I ? II ? t <4-! I I I I I I I I II I II tl II I M I I I II II I I I i M II ?+++
ALASKA COAST CO. jj
For Vakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouchc, Seward, . ?
I! Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU \\
!! S. S. YUKON ? ? - FEBRUARY 4
!! SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA "
\\ connecting at Seattle for San Francisco and Southern California ports ' j
S. S. YUKON .... FEBRUARY 14 ??
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice. ?'
; " For further information apply to
T S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle
nil W+H H ! n H H ) i I I t I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II t
1' A C I F I C COAST S T E A MSHI P C 0. }
? STEAMERS FOR ?
SJLVTTI.K, TACOMA, ?
+ Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, *
J South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francisco. 5
? Anacortcs, Los Angeles and San Diego. t
| J C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. ?
^ ^ 112 Market Street, San Francisco. 115 James Street, Seattle ^
: ? Q Q C NORTHBOUND FEB. 4 J
? V-?Ur3.C3.0 SOUTHBOUND FEB. 5 J
? Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING. Local Agt. J
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
I JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU. DOUGLAS. TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau fur
DoukIuh and
Tread well
*8:00 a. n:.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p m.
4:30 p. m.
. 6:30 p.m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Tread
well for
Juncuu
: *8:25 a. ra. |
3:25 a. m. |
j 12:00 noon !
1:40 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
4:55 p. m.
6:55 p. m.
8:25 p. m.
3:25 p. m.
11:25 p. m.
leaven
Douglas for
Juneau
?8:30 a. in.
9:30 a. m. '
12:05 p. m.
1:45 p. m.
3:30 p. m
5:30 p. m.
7:05 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
9:30 p. m.
11:30 p. m.
Leaves Juneau dally
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. m.
II
,1 4:30 p. m.
II
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
11 5:10 p. m.
From Juneau for
Sheep Creek
Saturday Night. Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Leaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. in.
Leaves Tre;.dwell
11:45 p. in.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. in.
Sunday Schedule same as above, except trip leaving Juneau at S a. m. i? omitted I
"" "
.I-H-I-H-I ?Iii1ii1ii1ii1 >1 -I -I 1-1--I I I I M-H-H-H
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX |
Restaurant in Connection Established 1881 European Flan ||
III COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME ||
" FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS, Mngr. JUNEAU, ALASKA -
?1-I-r-I-l 1-1 H111M I-H-H-l-H-I M lLMM"lfM4MM 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 I 1 1
: UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Kegal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES. FURNISHINGS
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.
(

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