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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 04, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1913-02-04/ed-1/seq-3/

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[ JUNEAU LIQUOR COMPANY, Inc. I
t f
[ We have for the table the T
[ CRESTA BLANCA AND EL DORADO WINES !
f FINE OLD BRANDY AND SCOTCH ?
i t.-,. RYE AND BOURBON Front St. ^
I OPERA LIQUOR CO., inc. I
| Thos. ii. Ashby. Pres. X. G. Hays. Sec.-Treas. a
f COR. SEWARD AND SECOND STREETS
i I
I Finest Straight Whiskies Cigars That Everybody Likes to Smoke ?
I ?
\ A RESORT FOR GENTLEMEN J
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. .Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Hacon Are
Home-Smoked
???? MHII??
OLYMPIA BEER
"IT'S THE WATER"
FOR SALE AT ALL FIRST-CLASS BARS AND CAFES
? Juneau Transfer Co. j
f coal wood ?
? storage :
J Moving Carefully Done ?
} Our Long Suit ^
I ?
I FRONT STREET ?
? ?
I Watkins 8 Gerdon ? :
I EXPERT BLACKSMITHS ? '
I and IRON WORKERS t
? ?
? General Blacksmithing. Horse- ?
? Shoeing. Iron and Marine Work ^
J Estimates Furnished and J
? Work Guaranteed ?
? ?
? FRANKLIN STREET ?
J Near Alaska Steam Laundry J
? ?
?
?
?
?
?
McCloskeys I
i i i r i i i i i : : i ; i : i ; i i i : i : I i i'
r The Louvre Bar |
* " Al CurL-Kjn. Prop. . ? ;
m m Imported amijDume<tic
:: LIQUORS AND CIGARS ??
RAINIER BEER ON DRAUGHT "
b Phone 3-3-o Juneau ??
4--I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I
J. W. DORAN
DRUGS
PHONE 3
104 Second St. Juneau, Alaska
1 _____mmmm_____?_?__
R. P. NELSON
Wholesale and Retail Dealer
in All Kinds
STATIONERY
Typewriting Supplies. Blank
Books, Office Supplies. Sporting
Goods, Huyler's Candies, Gun
ther's Candies, Toys, Notions,
Books. Magazines, Waterman's
Fountain Pens, Conklin Pens,
Etc.
Cor. 2nd. and Seward Sts.
Juneau, Alaska
Berry's Store
LADIES' GOODS
Arriving on Every Boat for
Every Occasion
H H H I 1 I 1 I I I I I I I I I K 1 1 I M'
? : The Alaska Grill f
!!
The'Beit Appointed
I Place in Town
I Best Jof Everything Served !!
A at Moderate Prices ;;
miiniiii}ii:iiii ii.' y-j-w
THE BEST LOAF OF
: BREAD *
=====
f Is Sold At ??
z ?
? San Francisco Bakery f
? G. MESSERSCHMIDT, Prop. J
1
First National
Bank
OF JUNEAU
CAPITAL $50,000
SURPLUS $10,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS $15,000
DEPOSITS OVER $400,000
Complete facilities for the
transaction of any banking
business.
OFFICERS
T. F. KENNEDY, Pres.
JOHN RECK. Vice-Pres.
A. A. GABBS, Cashier
DIRECTORS
F. W. BRADLEY
E. P. KENNEDY
GEO. F. MILLER
T. F. KENNEDY
JOHN RECK
P. H. FOX
A. A. GABBS
M. J. O'CONNOR
Latest Novelties in
Tobacco Jars and
Pipe Racks
at Burford's
lULUAtaj.*.**
Just [scaped a Panic
During Past Two Months
David U. Korean, president of the
National City Bank of Chicago, told
t lu* members of the New York Cred
it Men's Association recently that the
j country has escaped a panic by the
narrowest of squeaks within the past
two months.
"We have just passed through sixty
days of the tightest money since
1907." the speaker declared, "and if
anything had blown up. if anything
had happened to frighten the people,
we should have had another panic.
"In these sixty days there has hard
ly been a bank that has held a lawful
reserve, and the Comptroller of the
Currency has wisely said nothing
about it, for he is a broad minded, sen
sible fellow
Favors a Central Bank
"A central bank," continued Mr.
Forgan, "such as we have looked to
for years would forever quiet the fears
of the people, for it would be backed
by the government."
The credit men were holding their
mid-winter dinner at the Hotel Astori
when this secret was imparted to them
by the Chicago banker. He was the
principal speaker, other addresses be
ing delivered by I'rof. Francis Henry
Green of the State Normal School at
West Chester, Pa., and Julian A. Greg-:
ory, counsel for the association. Geo.
H. Williams, its president, was toast
master.
"I feel that it is pretty nearly a na
tional disgrace." Mr. Forgan said in
the course of his speech, "that this
country blessed by (lod with the
greatest resources, containing the best
business over in the world, is the only
one that has had national panics?six
or seven of them?in which the sus
pension of banks was brought about.
"The question is: How long are
you going to stand it? Three years
ago this government appointed a mon
etary commission to consult with the
ablest bankers of the world and come
back and tell us why our system is
bad. They have come back. They
have reported. They have made it
clear to me that this country is suffer
ing from a kind of smallpox that other
civilized countries have ceased to suf
fer from.
"Those Milk Tickets."
"They told us that our system lacked
elasticity. It is hardly necessary for
me recall to you those milk tickets
the clearing house certificates?that
were issued in the last panic. It is
the American country banker that
causes panics. Something happens in
New York -it always happens in New
York, because nothing big enough to
matter caould happen anywhere else
and the First National of Albany,
let us say. gets uneasy.
"It says that while it doesn't want
to discommode New York, it must
withdraw its reserves. And then it
all happens. I don't blame the First
National of Albany. It's the system
that is to blame. The president of
that frightened bank is acting just
as you or I would In a similar posi
tion."
THE WEATHER REPORT EOR JANUARY
MONTH OF JANUARY. 1913. STATION. JUNEAU. TER. OF ALASKA
Temperature
Maximum Minimum
January 1 ???'.
January - 36
January 3 37 21
January 4 32 20
January 5 32 20
January 6 34
; January 7 34 22
January S 22 12
January 'J 4" 9
January 10 25
January 11 20 1
January 12 24
January 13 24 14
January 14 11 1?
i January 15 20 <
January 10 l-r> l'1
January 17 15
| January IS 12 <
January 10 10 3
iJanuary 20 19 1?
: January 21 19 1;>
! January 22 17 10
jJanuary 23 24 12
January 24 31 23
January 25 37 2<
January 20 3S 35
January 27 40
January 2S 40 35
January 29 36
I January 30 3S
j January 31 40
Summary ...82S 594
Rain or Snow ? _ ? w .
Cloudy, Partly ? a ^ ~
Cloudy Clear ~ t -
? 2 ?o
Cloudy?Snow .20 .15
Cloudy?Snow .10 26
Partly Cloudy?Snow .04 21
Cloudy?Snow .07 20
Cloudy?Snow .31 32
Cloudy -Snow .90 34
Cloudy?Snow .15 22
Clear 14
Clear 17
Partly Cloudy?Snow .21 16
Clear 14
Clear 2*
Clear 14
Clear 13
Clear 14
Clear 11
Clear 12
Partly Cloudy?Snow Trace 7
Cloudy?Snow .11 10
Cloudy?Snow .36 18
Cloudy?Snow .11 16
Cloudy?Snow .43 14
Cloudy?Snow .58 23
Cloudy- -Snow .09 27
Cloudy?Rain .19 35
Cloudy?Rain .24 38
Cloudy?Rain .25 40
Cloudy?Rain .30 35
Cloudy?Rain .04 36
Cloudy?Rain .40 38
Cloudy?Rain .04 36
5.21 722
Maximum temperature during
month 40 degrees; dates Jan. 27. 28.
Minimum temperature during
month. 3 degrees; date Jan. 10,
and 31.
The greatest daily range occurred
on Jan. 12. and 15. on wnicn nays iuem
was a variation of 13 degrees.
Total rainfall 5.21 inches; greatest
in 24 hours, .90 inches, on Jan. 6.
There were nine clear days, three
partly cloudy, and 19 cloudy.
C. R.REID, Co-operative Observer
Juneau, Alaska.
i THE FISHING FLEET.
I
Rolfe?Ar. Fob. 3
Kennebec?Sailed Jan. 21.
Aloha?Ar. Jan. 21).
Dora H.?Sailed Jan. 25.
Pacific?Arrived Jan. 22.
Active.?Out.
Olga?Sailed Jan. 21.
Belle?Sailed Dec. 11.
Highland Queen?Laid up.
Louise?Sailed Dec 27.
Norman Sunde?Sailed Jan. 12.
Volunteer.?Out.
Valkyrie?Out.
Vesta?Sailed Jan. 27.
Xhanthus?Sailed Dec. 19.
Waife?I^aid up.
White Star?In port.
Lister?Sailed Jan. 25.
Olympic?Sailed Dec. 10.
Dick?At Sitka
Dolphin?Sailed Jan. 15.
Halley's?Out.
Alameda?Out.
Annie?Sailed Jan. 28.
_ Uranus?Out.
~~ Pollux?In port.
Cedrlc?Out.
Thelma?Sailed Jan. 9.
Alvida?Sailed Dec. 14.
Comet?Sailed Dec. 21.
Solkol?Sailed Dec. 30.
Anita Phillips?Ar. Feb. 3.
Standard?Ar. Jan. 3.
Gjoa?Sailed Jan. 8.
Thekle?Sailed Jan. 21.
Alaska has rich zinc mines, bu
> they cannot be developed without rai
road transportation.
EDISON HASN'T LEFT
LABORATORY IN MONTHS
NEW YORK, Feb. 4.?That Thomas
A. Edison has not left his laboratory
for two months, that he has his meals
passed in to him, and sleeps a few
hours each night by thu side of his
work bench, and that he does not In
tend to come outside until his latest
Invention, the kinetophone, better
known as the "talking movies," hat
been perfected, became known last
night.
?Mrs. Edison and her daughter Made
line appeared at the annual exerciset
of the American Museum of Safety at
the United States Engeinoering So
cieties' building and received for Mr
Edison the Rathenau medal present
ed annually to the inventor of the bes
electrical device or process for th?
safeguarding of human life. Mr. Edi
son's achievement, which caused hin
to be the first American to win th<
coveted trophy, was that of a Ugh
without heat, which can be use<
around dangerous explosives.
In expressing the great inventor'
thanks for the honor, Mrs. Edison e?
plained that absolutely nothing coul
induce him to leave the laboratory ur
til the kinetophone is performing t
his satisfaction.
Finest line of Calabash pipes 1
Alaska at BURFORD'S
t WANTED?To rent furnished houE
1- tn good locality. Address X.Y.Z. En
pire office.
OLE FINSTED !
HALE A CITIZEN
Olo Finsted, former Kiondikcr, ono
time owner of one of the richest Bo
nanza claims and the Empire hotel
and other properties inDawson, has
had a new experience. After leaving
Dawson ho bought a ranch in North
ern Mexico. The outlaws raided the
place and killed Ole's brother-in-law
and otherB. Ole was nearly killed. As
he was the only man found alive 011
the place by the Mexican authorities,
ho was charged with the murder of
the others. Under the Mexican law,
a man is guilty until proven innocent,
ditions. Ole was convicted, and had a
especially when found under such con
hard fight for years, winning Ins free
dom. Now he has a new experience,
reported from Los Angeles as follows:
"Presiding Judge Willis, of the su
perior court, denied naturalization
papers to Ole Finsted, a rancher and
miner, because if they were granted
the United States might become In
volved in a controversy with Mexico.
"Finsted came to the United States j
in 1881 and in 1801 filed his petition
for citizenship. Several years later
he joined the stampede to the Klon
dike, making a lot of money in the
early days of Dawson. About 1902
he went to Mexico, where he again
engaged in mining. He became in-i
volved in a row in which a Mexican
was killed. After three years' im
prisonment Finsted returned to Losj
Angeles.
"Judge Willis explained that the de
partment of commerce and labor at
Washington had advised his action,
fearing the United States would be
come involved with Mexico in a dam
age suit the applicant might bring;
against the republic for false impris
onment.
"Finsted alleges that the killing of
the Mexican was accidental."
Thomas Spence raised numerous
checks in Vancouver. B. C., and is be
lieved to have fled to Alaska.
|
SEAL SHIFT OYSTERS?Fresh at
the local agency?CHAS. flOI.DSTEIN
* Tf
C. F. CHEEK
THE TAXIDERMIST !
THAT KNOWS
Game Heads, Fish and Birds
Mounted.
SKINS AND FURS TANNED
Rug Work a Specialty
Prices Reasonable
?????????????????????????? !
? F. Wolland 1
* 5
! Tailor \
x ?
?
% Phone 60 SECOND ST. *
| t
!
??nmrmn rrri?????????
C. W. YOUNG COMPANY
Dealers in !
Mining, Fishing, Plumbing
and Building Supplies
Front Street Juneau
PETERSBURG FISH C07
All Kinds of
FRESH AND SALT FISH
CLAMS AND CRABS
All Orders Promptly Filled
PETERSBURG ALASKA
?M-I'I'I 1 1 1 ?! ?! ?! I-l-H I 1 H' M ! I 1 I I 1 1 1 M 1 I
{ THE CIRCLE CITY HOTEL !
;; MRS. M. E. BERGMANN, Prop. t
-? HEADQUARTERS for PROSPECTORS AND MINING MEN J
ELECTRIC LIGHTED STEAM HEATED If
"THIRD STREET JUNEAU, ALASKA T
T
J. 4.
"America's Finest Flouring Mills"
Plant and Product
one and inseparable
Pronounced by experts ".liucricu's Finest Flouring
Mills," the plant of the Fisher Flouring M lls
Comi'ANV, was designed and constructed to produce
America's Most Efficient Breadstuff,
Fisher s Blend Flour
Separate machinery is provided for grinding hard and soft
wheat. Kverv grain is washed in the famously pure Cedar
River water and thoroughly dried before being ground.
It IS IH> MIC [IO.IM II) n,|) Ulill I...)
product is the cleanest, most fcien
tifically blended, most economical
(lour offered for sale today. Combin
ing as it docs Eastern Hard Wheat
and Western Soft Wheat, it Rises to
public and private bakeries a ma
terial which has all the advantages
of 1mith hard and soft wheat fours,
is better than cither, and deci ledly
superior to any other blend hereto
fore produced.
One price at nil dealers
> Fisher's BLEND
FLOUR
DO YOU TAKE IT?
. . .
The Daily Empire publishes all the news, all the time
i
; IT IS CLEAN, UP-TO-DATE, PROGRESSIVE
"
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One Dollar per Month Delivered by Carrier in Juneau, Douglas and Treadwell
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3
s
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d
? TRY IT AND YOU WILL KEEP IT
n
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