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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 06, 1913, Image 2

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AJ SKA DAILY EMPIRE
J. F. A. STRONG
Telephone No. 3-7-4
Filtered as second-class matter November 7, 1912 at the postotllce at Ju
neau \ tska. under the Act of March 3. 1S79.
9 |
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
CX^e year, by mall $10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
JUNEAU, ALASKA. THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 6. 1913.
SEVERAL TRUNK RAILROADS NEEDED
THE report of the Alaska Railroad Commission covers the
-ground substantially as was predicted by The Empire sev
eral weeks ago. Then it was stated that it was not at all
probable that the commission would make any specific recom
mendation as to routes for a railroad from the coast to the in
terior. although, by inference, the Copper river valley route from
Cordova is favored, because, according to the report, the Copper
river and Tanana river valleys would be opened up. and the Ber
ing river coal fields could be reached by a spur from the Copper
river road.
T!u argument advanced that a railroad through the Susit
na valley to the Matanuska coal fields and Fairbanks, would be
useless in developing the Copper river valley, is an act of super
erogation. for, neither would a railroad through the Copper river
valley to Fairbanks develop the Matanuska coal fields or the Su
sitna or Kuskokwim valleys. And besides the Copper river val
ley now has substantial railroad a couple of hundred miles in
length.
A statement, however, with wnicn ail Aiassans win agree
is that which says that several railroads will be required to prop
erly open the country to development. This is eminently true, as
is also that other statement that one corporation does not hold
the k?y to the Alaska coal fields. This shibboleth of the muck
rackers and their congeners was exploded long ago. but since it
now has had the commission's denial, it may be laid away with
many .. her exploded Alaska theories beloved of those who have
beer- instrumental in retarding the Territory's material progress.
> 1 another statement contained in the report of the com
mission is that which touches upon the route from a terminal
either "near Juneau or Haines." with the int erior terminal at
Fairbanks. While we would not deprive any of the coast termin
p ? - of a railroad, we're enthusiastically in favor of the routes
;'r m Juneau and Haines: and the time is coming when that pro
j"C! v:[" it- consummated, as will also the building of other roads
<>ir >? istal points, such as Cordova. Seward and Valdez to tap
th grt-sat interior country: and each of these would open to
development great regions, so vast, in fact, that by no possibility
c .1 raih >ad be brought into competition with the other.
T 1; .iivl.ng of these railroad- will be necessarily a work of time,
bar th. v will come. The thing for the Congress to do now is to
a. .e the construction of one trunk road, or aid in its con
s ru ion. The others will follow.
Xow, when Mr. Joslin declared that "an indictment is a pre
sumption of honor in Alaska," did he mean an indicted banker,
or n rely a would-be coal baron? There is a wide distinction be
tween the two.
GIVE RELIEF TO ALASKA
THE Portland Oregonian in an editorial article expresses the
? pinion that if Congress should attempt any other than tar
iff legislation at the extra session, it could not do better than
take up bills for the development of Alaska. The other sub
jects of national importance besides the tariff call for action,
namely, trusts and finances, but each of these will provoke so
much discussion that it should be the chief topic of a session.
There is small reason to hope, the Oreponian thinks, that Con
gress would divide attention in the special session between the
tariff and either one of these subjects. Some Democratic leaders
are already talking of postponing currency legislation to the reg
ular session.
Alaska legislation is not in the same class with these ex
tremely controversial questions. There is a pretty general agree
ment in both leading parties as to what should be done. Congress
already has before it the report of the commission on railroads,
and the policy of government construction has been recommend
ed both from the Republican side, by President Taft and Secre
tary Fisher, and from the Democratic side by Representative
(now governor) Sulzer. Leasing of coal and oil land is favored
by leading men on both sides. There is therefore small room for
disagreement except on details.
Bills such as those for Alaska could well be disposed of by
each house while it is awaiting the action of the other house on
one of the tariff bills. The Democrats talk of taking up the Phil
ippine bill, but the case of Alaska is far more urgent than that
of the Philippines. Thousands of American citizens have gone
to that wild country prepared to develop it and are suffering loss
and privation because legal obstacles stand in their way. The
Filipinos can better wait another year for the decision when
they are to become independent than the Alaskans can wait for
permission to develop the country in which they have cast their
fortunes.
AGE OF MIRACLES HAS NOT PASSED
THE whirligig of time brings many changes. Wonders never
cease. Oh. the times! Oh, the manners! Here is a trust
that is willing to.accept lower duties. It is the-Sugar Trust
that has done this unprecedented thing, and it does not plead that
i: is lii iven to this step by a guilty conscience; nor out of grati
tudi to the public does it offer to make a sacrifice of itself. It
does not propose to throw its past profits at theconsumer's head
as a simple act of justice. It has not been carried away by an
irresistible impulse of charity.
Sincere as it may be in its new faith as a tariffrevisionist,
tin Sugar Trust is not fanatical. It does not insist upon going to
extremes. It has not suddenly become a rabid free-trader, and
its sentimental devotion to the millions of people to whom its
sugar is a daily necessity is tempered with prudence, tl does not
threaten to close down its refineries if the tariff remains un
changed. In a pinch it would probably survive that catastro
; phe and pull through somehow under high protection. L
What the Sugar Trust wants is a "moderate reduction" in
the sugar tariff. How moderate it does not say?it is not exact
ing in its demands?but no doubt more moderate than it thinks
Congress is minded to make next spring.
Still, a trust that solicits lower duties is an inspiring sight.
Moved by the Sugar Trust's noble example, who knows but some ^
day soon the Steel Trust may get down on its knees and implore
Congress to make a moderate reduction in the metal schedule,
and the Woollen Trust may send stump-speakers through the
country to declare that Schedule Iv is indefensible and that 45
per cent duties are not necessarily "free trade"?
Judge James W. Witten, who may be the next Commissioner!
of the General Land Office, would be admirably fitted for the du
ties of that important office. Pie is a gentleman of ripe exper
ience and sound judgment. Furthermore, he knows the West
and he knows Alaska and the conditions obtaining, and Alaska .
would get a "square deal." all that that Alaskans have ever
asked. J
II III I 1 I I M M-M'I 1 I-M 1 1 I-M-l
:: Northern News Notes I
-I- I' I I 1 I I l I I I I I I l I I I I I 1 i 1 I I i
A camp of the Arctic Brotherhood is
to be organized at Petesrburg. W. H.
Courtney is heading the movement.
? ? ?
Milo Caughrean, of Ketchikan, is
looking over Petersburg for the pur
pose of installing a water system and
I electric light plant.
? ? ?
Jimmy Yamato and his friend Olaf
Ekren, who disappeared on Duncan
canal on Jan. 17, have not been
found.
? ? ?
Petersburg has 20 pupils enrolled
in the primary grade and 15 in the
grammar grade of the public school.
? ? -
The wireless station at Eagle, 100
miles below Dawson, has been making'
come wonderful record^ Recently
the station communicated with Key'
West, Fla. The distance is over 4,000;
miles. Eagle is a 35-kilowat station,
and the transmitter a Telefunken ma
] chine.
? * *
Two couples at Carinacks, Y. T..
were anxiously awaiting the return
Df Bishop Stringer, so that they could
j ();? married, says the Whitehorse Star.
* * *
Captain Sid Barriugton, the well
known Yukon navigator and Jerry
Quinlan. a popular conductor of the
White Pass road, are in Mexico, seeing
the bullfights and other things.
* * *
Lieut. Anderson, of Fort Liseum,
Valdez, recently dislocated his shoul
der while skating.
* * *
Col. O'Neill and the entire garrison
at Fort Liseum, sent a message to
j Helen Gould congratulating her upon
? er marriage.
. . .
The Alaska Road Commission has a
force of twelve men and 40 horses j
| at work distributing supplies along'
the Fairbanks-Valdez trail. The com
mission will employ 150 men on the
trail from Valdez commencing about
June 1.
? ? ?
A lodge of the Loyal Order of Moose
is to be organized at Petersburg in
the near future.
. . .
William Leasing, an old-time ca- X
terer of Dawson, died recently at I
Prince Rupert. T
* * * ?
Igloo, No. 6, of the Pioneers of Alas- 2
ka, has been organized at Ruby, with t
Charles E. Hoxie, president, and Ray ?
E. McDonald, Secretary; historian, C. 2
K. Snow. i
331-3% DISCOUNT! 1
On all ladies', tailor-made suits,
coats and one-piece dresses
One-third off ? one-third off?Must <>
have room for Spring goods.
CHAS. GOLDSTEIN.
WANT TO FORECAST
YEAR'S WEATHER ;
WASHINGTON, Feb. 6.?The weath- <|
, er specialists are planning to extend <
their forecasts from six months to a <
year. If the Carnegie Foundation will <
give $3,000,000 to inaugurate an inter- * |
national weather bureau, which Is J
said to be probable, the work will be <
undertaken. < [
"It is the dream of the weather man <[
ultimately to make accurate weather <
forecasts for a year," says Prof. Henry <
H. Clayton, scientist, of New York, <j
1 "This could not be done in the United ;
[ States, for instance, solely on data <
? that could be gathered within this ?
. country. Information-gathering sta- J
tions would have to be established in <
the remotest places of the earth to n
? furnish data." 1
LEARN EVERY DAY?
NO, NOT AT TRENTON
WASHINGTON, Feb. 6. ? John C. -
Floyd, of Arkansas and several other
Congressmen journeyed to Trenton the
other day to ask President-elect Wil
son to appoint Henry D. Clayton, of
Alabama Attorney-General. Today Mr. I
Floyd was telling a party of friends
that It is a man's duty to gather a lit- i
tie knowledge every day.
"1 have learned a little something
every day of my life." said Mr. Fyold.
"No. that is too strong. You do not
learn anything the day you go to j
Trenton."
FOR OLD-TIME SPELLER
WASHINGTON. Feb. 6.?Represen
tative Thomas U. Sisson, of Missis- t
sippi, although a progressive Demo- ?,
crat. is a stand-patter when it comes
to teaching spelling in the public
schools. Speaking at the John Eaton
School at Chevy Chase, Mr. Sisson ad
vocated the use of the "old blue
backed speller." with its b-v by, b-o,
bo. and s-h-a sha. d-v dy, shady; in
stead of the new way of "ker-art-ter,
cat."
The Juneau Steamship Co.
U. S. Mail Steamer
GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route?Leaves
Juneau for Hoonah, Gypsum, 1
Tenakee, Killisnoo and Sitka? J
8:00 a. in., Nov. 5, 11, 17, 23, 29,
Dec. 5, 11, 17. 23, 29, Jan. 4. 10,
16. 22, 28. Feb. 3, 9. 15, 21. 27,
March 5. 11. 17. 23 and 29.
Leaves Juneau for Funter and
Chatham. 8:00 a. m.?Nov. 17,
Dec. 11, Jan. 4. 28, Feb. 21, l
March it. I
Leaves Juneau for Tyee, 8:00
a. m.?Nov. 23. Dec. 23, Jan. 22,
Feb. 21, March 23.
Juneau - Skagway Route ?
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor, |
Eagle River, Yankee Cove, Sen
tinel Light Station, Jualin, El
drcd Rock Light Station, Com
et, Haines, Skagway,, 8:00 a. m.
?Nov. 3. 9, 15. 21, 27, Dec. 3,
9. 15. 21, 27. Jan. 2, 8. 14, 20.
26. Feb. 1, 7. 13, 19. 25, March
3, 9. 15, 21. 27.
Returning leaves Skagway the i
following day at 8:00 a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWKLL. MANAGER ?
1
1111111in11111111111ii1111111111111 j~
Add to the Comfort and Charm of Your Home ii
Nothing u<kin more to the attractiveness of tho home than , , _
u well-appointed table. It helps to mnke the home the place , ,
home ought to be. Ami you would lie surprised, perhaps, , ,
how much it adds to the positive relish of the meal. We , ,
make it easy for you to supply your homo-little by little, if , ,
you like?with a tasteful puttern of silverwure. . ,
These goods are up-to-duto and most reliable of any mude , ,
i Come and See Our Look for the Trade Mark t t
Silverware Department ?ft,,c ) J
f GORHAM CO. i i ?
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II | I I I I M I I I I I I I I
Professional Cards
R. W. JENNINGS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Lewis Building, Juneau
Z. R. CHENEY
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW ?
Lewis Building, Juneau
Gunnison & Marshall
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW ~
Decker Building
Juneau Alaska' Z.
??????i??wmmmmmmmmm hi
H. P. CROWTHER
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
U. S. Mineral Surveyor
Office ? Lewis Block ? Juneau 4
N. WATANABE
DENTIST
Office Over Purity Pharmacy
Juneau ? - ? * Alaska
JOHN B. DENNY ~ |
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW il
Mining and Corporation Law "j
Offices: Juneau, Alaska
Seattle, Wash.
|:i
j;;
T
X
+?
The Empire ?
f?r : ?
?
fob Printing!
? ?>
?
? ?
' ' z
Good Stock -
Modern Plant
Plus
Printers that Know
Equal
\z
Unexcelled Printing |
[MAIN STREET j;
i -?
Phone 3-7-4
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
The Alaska Flyer S. S. HUMBOLDT The Akwka Flyer
NORTHBOUND
SOUTHBOUND '
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Seattle Ollice, 710 Second Ave. GEO. BURFORD, A^ent
-I- !? H ! I I I 11 11 1 1 M I 1 I 1 M11 I M 1
ALASKA STEAMSHIP CO.
STEAMERS CALLING AT KETCHIKAN, WRANGEL, DETERS- "
BURG, DOUGLAS, JUNNEAU, HAINES AND SKAGWAY !!
JEFFERSON Northbound.... J AN. 26 Southbound ...JAN. 27 -
ALAMEDA " ....JAN. 29 II
NORTHWESTERN Westbound JAN. 30 *;
MARIPOSA " FEB. 1 Southbound ....FEB. 7
Tickets to Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria and Vancouver. Through
tickets to San Francisco.
ELMER E. SMITH, Douglas Agt. WILLIS E. NOWELL, Agt.
H-H-H+rH-l ?! 1 ?Mil H-l-l-l-I-I-HH-H-HHH
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.-B.C.CoastService
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prince Rupert, Swanson, Alert Ray, .Vancou irer
Victoria and Seattle
PRINCESS MAY FEB. 13
Front and Seward St?. C. P. R. TICKET OFFICE J. T. SPICK F.TT. A*t.
11 m i M 1111111111111111111111 M M 111111
ALASKA COAST CO. ii
For Yakutat, Katalla, Cordova, Ellamar, Valdez, Latouche, Sewa*d,
Seldovia?SAILS FROM JUNEAU
S. S. YUKON - - - FEBRUARY 4 "
SAILS FROM JUNEAU FOR SEATTLE AND TACOMA "
connecting at Seattle for San Franciscc and Southern California po*ts j |
S. S. YUKON .... FEBRUARY 14
Right is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates without notice.
, For further information apply to ' ?
S. H. Ewing, Juneau Agent. ALASKA COAST COMPANY, Seattle 11
k-H-i -+-i-r4 -*-M i I ! I I I i I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I II
P A C I F I C CO A S T S T E A M SHIP C 0. ?
STEAMERS FOR ?
skattijs, tacoma, %
Victoria Vancouver, Bellingham, Everett, Olympia, Port Townsend, +
South Bellingham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico, San Francls:o, ?
Anacortes, Los Angeles and San Diego. J
C. D. DUNANN, P. T. M. G. W. ANDREWS, G. A. P. D. I
112 Market Street, San Francisco. 113 James Street, Seattle 4
SO f NORTHBOUND FEB 4 *
? Curacao SOUTHBOUND FEB 5 ^
Right Reserved to Change Schedule. S. HOWARD EWING, Local Agt. J
FERRY TIME SCHEDULE
JUNEAU FERRY & NAVIGATION Co.?Operating Ferry Service Be
tween JUNEAU. DOUGLAS, TREADWELL and SHEEP CREEK
Lv. Juneau for
Douglas and
Tread well
*8:00 a. n:. I
9:00 a. 11:. |
11:00 a. in.'
1:00 p. m.
3:00 p in. I
4:30 p. m.
6:30 p. ni.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. ra.
11:00 p. m.
Lv. Trca?l
well for
Juneau
?8725 a. III.
9:25 a. m.
12:00 noon
1:40 p. m.
I 3:25 p.m.
4:55 p. in.
6:55 p. m.
S: 25 p. rn.
1 9:25 p.m.
11:25 p. rn.
Leave*
DoukIaii for
Juneuu
| ?8: 30 a. m. I
! 9:30 a. ra.
12:05 p. in. ;
1:45 p. m. i
I 3:30 p. IE
' 5:30 p. m. j
! 7:05 p.m. !
! 8:30 p.m. ;
J 9:30 p. in.
' 11:30 p. m. |
(.eaves Juneau daily
for Sheep Creek
11:00 a. in. I
4:30 p. m.
Leaves Sheep
Creek for Juneau
11:40 a. m.
r>:10 p. ra.
From Juneau for
Sheep Cree <
Saturday Ni?cht Only
11:00 p. m.
for Juneau
Returning Liaves
Sheep Creek
11:40 p. :n.
Leaves Treadwell
11:45 p. m.
Leaves Douglas
11:50 p. in.
Sunday Schedule* same as above, except trip leaving Juneau at a. rn. is omitted |
H-H-M-H- !? 1 ! ?!?! -I-I -l-l-H I ! I ! 1 I 1 I II 1 1 M
OCCIDENTAL HOTEL AND ANNEX j
Restaurant in Connection ? Established 18S1 European P an
COMMERCIAL MEN'S HOME li
FRONT ST. JOHN P. OLDS. Mngr. JUNEAU. ALASKA ??
'!? !??! I..I..H"M"1,,MiiI"IiT'1III"1I,Ii !? 1"! 'LI 1 I 1 I 1 11 ?! I 1 I I-fr
UNION IRON WORKS Machine Shop and Foundry
Gas Engines and Mill Castings
Agents Union Gas Engine and Regal Gas Engine
We Are Headquarters for
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING
BOOTS AND SHOES, FURNISHINGS
i *
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
ALASKA-TREADWELL GOLD MINING CO.

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